Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMediterranean Diet
IN THE NEWS

Mediterranean Diet

FEATURED ARTICLES
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | February 25, 2013
A new study provides the best evidence to date that a Mediterranean diet high in olive oil, fish, vegetables and nuts can reduce heart disease. The research, published today in the New England Journal of Medicine online edition, found that the diet can reduce heart attacks and strokes by 30 percent. Other scientists have had similar findings, but this study conducted in Spain is the first major clinical trial. Previous research mostly showed that people living in Mediterranean countries had low risk of heart disease.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | February 25, 2013
A new study provides the best evidence to date that a Mediterranean diet high in olive oil, fish, vegetables and nuts can reduce heart disease. The research, published today in the New England Journal of Medicine online edition, found that the diet can reduce heart attacks and strokes by 30 percent. Other scientists have had similar findings, but this study conducted in Spain is the first major clinical trial. Previous research mostly showed that people living in Mediterranean countries had low risk of heart disease.
Advertisement
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | February 25, 2013
New research has found that the Mediterranean diet is linked to a healthy heart. The diet is rich in vegetables, fish, olive oil and nuts. Thinking of switching or adopting some of the principals of the diet? Here is a Mediterranean diet recipe from the Mayo Clinic to get you started. Have a healthy recipe you'd like to share? Send it to andrea.walker@baltsun.com. Ingredients 1 small eggplant, peeled, cut into 1/4-inch slices 1 small yellow zucchini, cut into 1/4-inch slices 1 small green zucchini, cut into 1/4-inch slices 6 medium mushrooms, sliced 1 sweet red pepper, seeded, cored and cut into chunks 2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil 6 cups water 1 1/2 cups coarse polenta (corn grits)
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | February 25, 2013
New research has found that the Mediterranean diet is linked to a healthy heart. The diet is rich in vegetables, fish, olive oil and nuts. Thinking of switching or adopting some of the principals of the diet? Here is a Mediterranean diet recipe from the Mayo Clinic to get you started. Have a healthy recipe you'd like to share? Send it to andrea.walker@baltsun.com. Ingredients 1 small eggplant, peeled, cut into 1/4-inch slices 1 small yellow zucchini, cut into 1/4-inch slices 1 small green zucchini, cut into 1/4-inch slices 6 medium mushrooms, sliced 1 sweet red pepper, seeded, cored and cut into chunks 2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil 6 cups water 1 1/2 cups coarse polenta (corn grits)
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Hiser and Elizabeth Hiser,EATING WELL | March 19, 1997
There's something magical about the Mediterranean.A mystique seems to pervade the golden sunshine, the salty sea air and, especially, the food. The way the Mediterranean diet fuses flavor and health seems almost too good to be true. Throughout the 16 countries that border the Mediterranean, death rates from heart disease are half to one-third that of northern Europe or the U.S. And according to a recent study in Lyon, France, there was a 76 percent reduction in heart attacks and related complications in heart patients who followed a Mediterranean diet compared with those who ate the American Heart Association diet.
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,Special to the Sun | September 11, 2002
CAMPAGNA, Italy -- On a warm evening not too long ago, I sat in a kitchen with Giuseppina Maffia. Sixtyish, a widow, she lives in Pioppi, a tiny, time-has-passed-it-by coastal village in Southern Italy. Through friends of friends, I'd been introduced, and now I was watching her cook dinner. A neighbor stopped by, and this lady, learning that I was American, wanted to make sure I knew that Giuseppina's last name was spelled with two F's. "The Sopranos!" she said, and we all chuckled. There was a lot of laughter that night, humor being the only way to bridge the gap between their nonexistent English and my wretched Italian.
NEWS
By John Fauber and John Fauber,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 27, 2004
The secret to long life might be a Mediterranean-style diet with exercise and a little alcohol, according to a study likely to cause a gulp of uncertainty among Atkins-style dieters. The study, one of the first to look at the individual and combined effects of diet and lifestyle in older people, found a 23 percent reduction in deaths over a 10-year period among those who followed a Mediterranean diet. Similar reductions in deaths also were found among those who consumed moderate amounts of alcohol, primarily wine, at 22 percent lower; engaged in regular physical activity, 37 percent; and did not smoke, 35 percent.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2012
Baltimore Greek Week is coming back. The second annual celebration of Greek history, culture and food is scheduled to run from March 18-25. This year's theme is "The Mediterranean Diet : A Greek Journey Through Food. " Throughout the eight day event , some 20 area restaurants will participate by offering discounts and special menu items, along with special events like wine tastings, lectures and movie screenings. The grand finale of Greek Week, presented by the Baltimore-Piraeus Sister City Committee, is the annual Greek Independence Day parade on March 25. Highlights of the festival include the following: Zorba's in Greektown will feature a special $29.51 Greek platter from March 18-25, with grilled pork, grilled lamb chops, grilled octopus, Greek salad, Zorba's salad and some surprises.
NEWS
June 29, 2009
U.S. swine flu cases may have hit 1 million mark, officials say Health officials estimate that as many as 1 million Americans now have the new swine flu. Lyn Finelli, a flu surveillance official with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, voiced the estimate at a vaccine advisory meeting last week in Atlanta. The estimate is based on mathematical modeling. Nearly 28,000 U.S. cases have been reported to the CDC, accounting for roughly half the world's cases. The U.S. count includes 3,065 hospitalizations and 127 deaths.
HEALTH
By Debra Schulze, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center will provide a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth). This week, Debra Schulze, RD, LDN, weighs in on stroke prevention. A stroke, also called a "brain attack," can occur at any age. The good news is simple changes may significantly reduce your risk. Nutrition and exercise are two key modifiable behaviors. Go Mediterranean The Mediterranean Diet, rich in beneficial oils, whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and low in cholesterol and animal fat, has been shown in studies to reduce risk of stroke and heart attack.
HEALTH
By Debra Schulze, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center will provide a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth). This week, Debra Schulze, RD, LDN, weighs in on stroke prevention. A stroke, also called a "brain attack," can occur at any age. The good news is simple changes may significantly reduce your risk. Nutrition and exercise are two key modifiable behaviors. Go Mediterranean The Mediterranean Diet, rich in beneficial oils, whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and low in cholesterol and animal fat, has been shown in studies to reduce risk of stroke and heart attack.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2012
Baltimore Greek Week is coming back. The second annual celebration of Greek history, culture and food is scheduled to run from March 18-25. This year's theme is "The Mediterranean Diet : A Greek Journey Through Food. " Throughout the eight day event , some 20 area restaurants will participate by offering discounts and special menu items, along with special events like wine tastings, lectures and movie screenings. The grand finale of Greek Week, presented by the Baltimore-Piraeus Sister City Committee, is the annual Greek Independence Day parade on March 25. Highlights of the festival include the following: Zorba's in Greektown will feature a special $29.51 Greek platter from March 18-25, with grilled pork, grilled lamb chops, grilled octopus, Greek salad, Zorba's salad and some surprises.
NEWS
June 29, 2009
U.S. swine flu cases may have hit 1 million mark, officials say Health officials estimate that as many as 1 million Americans now have the new swine flu. Lyn Finelli, a flu surveillance official with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, voiced the estimate at a vaccine advisory meeting last week in Atlanta. The estimate is based on mathematical modeling. Nearly 28,000 U.S. cases have been reported to the CDC, accounting for roughly half the world's cases. The U.S. count includes 3,065 hospitalizations and 127 deaths.
NEWS
By John Fauber and John Fauber,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 27, 2004
The secret to long life might be a Mediterranean-style diet with exercise and a little alcohol, according to a study likely to cause a gulp of uncertainty among Atkins-style dieters. The study, one of the first to look at the individual and combined effects of diet and lifestyle in older people, found a 23 percent reduction in deaths over a 10-year period among those who followed a Mediterranean diet. Similar reductions in deaths also were found among those who consumed moderate amounts of alcohol, primarily wine, at 22 percent lower; engaged in regular physical activity, 37 percent; and did not smoke, 35 percent.
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,Special to the Sun | September 11, 2002
CAMPAGNA, Italy -- On a warm evening not too long ago, I sat in a kitchen with Giuseppina Maffia. Sixtyish, a widow, she lives in Pioppi, a tiny, time-has-passed-it-by coastal village in Southern Italy. Through friends of friends, I'd been introduced, and now I was watching her cook dinner. A neighbor stopped by, and this lady, learning that I was American, wanted to make sure I knew that Giuseppina's last name was spelled with two F's. "The Sopranos!" she said, and we all chuckled. There was a lot of laughter that night, humor being the only way to bridge the gap between their nonexistent English and my wretched Italian.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Hiser and Elizabeth Hiser,EATING WELL | March 19, 1997
There's something magical about the Mediterranean.A mystique seems to pervade the golden sunshine, the salty sea air and, especially, the food. The way the Mediterranean diet fuses flavor and health seems almost too good to be true. Throughout the 16 countries that border the Mediterranean, death rates from heart disease are half to one-third that of northern Europe or the U.S. And according to a recent study in Lyon, France, there was a 76 percent reduction in heart attacks and related complications in heart patients who followed a Mediterranean diet compared with those who ate the American Heart Association diet.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | September 28, 1994
It's not a diet, it's a way of life -- a prescription for good health that hasn't changed in thousands of years.It's the Mediterranean diet, a catchall phrase that includes the foods generally eaten on the edges of the Mediterranean Sea, from Spain to Italy to Greece to Lebanon to Morocco and Tunisia.Study after study has found high correlation between the typical diet of the people of this region and general good heath. Interest in the studies, and in the diet, has spawned a slew of cookbooks and created new markets for such Mediterranean foodstuffs as couscous, lentils, and olive oil.Increasingly, food with a Mediterranean focus is showing up on restaurant menus, as chefs and consumers seek food that is full-flavored and health-enhancing at the same time.
FEATURES
By Edward R. Blonz, Ph.D. and Edward R. Blonz, Ph.D.,Ed Blonz is a nutrition scientist based in Berkeley, Calif | January 15, 1992
In an affront to America's growing low-fat consciousness, the French diet has stormed the shores.In a two-pronged attack, hitting both the printed and electronic media, the French style of eating has been touted for its health benefits -- this despite the fact that the diet is often seen floating in fat and is typically flush with a daily intake of red wine. The message of the campaign was clear: The French diet can provide a pleasant passport around the debacle of heart disease.A front-page story in the New York Times late last fall showed the results of a 10-year study: those in the Gascony region of Southwest France live long lives and suffer few deaths from heart attack -- even though their diet is higher in fat than any other in the industrialized world.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | September 28, 1994
It's not a diet, it's a way of life -- a prescription for good health that hasn't changed in thousands of years.It's the Mediterranean diet, a catchall phrase that includes the foods generally eaten on the edges of the Mediterranean Sea, from Spain to Italy to Greece to Lebanon to Morocco and Tunisia.Study after study has found high correlation between the typical diet of the people of this region and general good heath. Interest in the studies, and in the diet, has spawned a slew of cookbooks and created new markets for such Mediterranean foodstuffs as couscous, lentils, and olive oil.Increasingly, food with a Mediterranean focus is showing up on restaurant menus, as chefs and consumers seek food that is full-flavored and health-enhancing at the same time.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | November 3, 1993
It's golden or bronze, silky-textured, it tastes great and it's good for you -- or at least, better for you than some alternatives. Can you guess what it is? A hint: It's positively ancient in origin. Another hint: It's No. 2 in dollar sales in its category.If you guessed olive oil, you are most likely a savvy, health-conscious, taste-conscious consumer -- or someone who grew up in a household where olive oil is a tradition as old as the family."There's no question about it," says Arlene Wanderman, a dietitian who works with the International Olive Oil Council.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.