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NEWS
March 23, 2014
I'd like to add to the recent article on meditation that for many people, moving meditation can also be a good way to quiet the mind, calm the emotions and heighten awareness ( "The pause that refreshes," March 20). I teach qigong in Baltimore. The slow, repetitive movements of this beautiful moving meditation can help practitioners enter a relaxed and quiet state of mind that's quite similar to that of seated, still meditation. And for some people, it's a bit easier to ease into a meditation practice by starting out with a moving form.
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NEWS
March 23, 2014
I'd like to add to the recent article on meditation that for many people, moving meditation can also be a good way to quiet the mind, calm the emotions and heighten awareness ( "The pause that refreshes," March 20). I teach qigong in Baltimore. The slow, repetitive movements of this beautiful moving meditation can help practitioners enter a relaxed and quiet state of mind that's quite similar to that of seated, still meditation. And for some people, it's a bit easier to ease into a meditation practice by starting out with a moving form.
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EXPLORE
By Cheryl Clemens | January 25, 2012
To understand the impact meditation can have on the human mind, picture a glass of muddy water. If you stir it, the water stays cloudy and anything that might sink to the bottom is instantly sucked back into motion. But if you allow the glass to become still, slowly the dirt settles to the bottom and the water begins to clear. Meditation means different things to different people, but most agree that it is a means of quieting the mind, of stilling the parade of daily distractions and becoming less reactive to the stimulation that assaults our senses and emotions every waking hour.
HEALTH
By Abigail Green, For The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
Meditation seems to be everywhere lately - on talk shows, in yoga studios, even on our smartphones. A recent Time magazine cover story announced that we're in the midst of "The Mindful Revolution. " Celebrities including hip-hop mogul Russell Simmons and Ellen DeGeneres promote the benefits of meditation, and how-to classes abound. The ancient practice is gaining traction in the mainstream and in medicine. Studies show that regular meditators boast the ability to tune out distractions and even lower blood pressure and reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | February 3, 2011
While medical science remains uncertain whether prayer has the power to heal, experts are pretty sure meditation works. Yet another study released last month — this one in the journal Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging — reports that those who meditated for about 30 minutes a day for eight weeks had measurable changes in brain density in areas related to memory, sense of self, empathy and stress. Exactly what those brain changes mean is not clear, but there also have been studies confirming that meditation can reduce blood pressure — in healthy people as well as in those with heart disease.
NEWS
By JOAN MELLEN and JOAN MELLEN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 5, 1997
"Toward The End Of Time," by John Updike. Alfred A. Knopf. $25. 342 pages.In John Updike's new speculative novel, "Toward The End Of Time," his 18th, Ben Turnbull, a retired investment counselor, faces the decline of his powers somewhere north of Boston in the year 2020. America has scarcely recovered from a nuclear war with China, the Midwest remaining radioactively uninhabitable. Federal Express is about to relocate the vestiges of the government to Memphis; the dollar has disappeared. To protect their property, people must hire private enforcers.
NEWS
By Dolly Merritt and Dolly Merritt,Special to The Sun | September 18, 1994
With the press of a button on the tape deck, four senior women at Florence Bain Senior Center listen to soft music and a gentle voice as they stretch out on floor mats."
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Staff Writer | August 25, 1992
Had it up to here with the gridlocked Congress, political lips that lie and blah, blah, blah on your TV screen?Of course you are, says Dr. John Hagelin, presidential candidate of the new Natural Law Party, campaigning yesterday in Baltimore.But has he got a tonic for you:* Savings of 50 percent in the nation's $800 billion annual health-care bill.* Higher levels of moral reasoning.* A perpetual growth phase for the economy.* An end to the "coarsening" and "demeaning" attack mode in politics.
NEWS
By Peg Adamarczyk and Peg Adamarczyk,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 17, 2000
IN OUR FAST-PACED world, time is a precious commodity that we never seem to have enough of to accomplish everything on our long "to do" lists. Jobs, spouses, kids, bills, laundry, groceries - rarely do we take the time to "smell the roses," to experience the calmer, spiritual side of our daily lives. On Sunday, Magothy United Methodist Church, at 3703 Mountain Road, will have an afternoon of relaxation, meditation, and spiritual enlightenment, playing host to a traveling labyrinth and a concert featuring harpist Christina Tourin.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella | June 4, 1991
She's been described as aloof in interviews, and she is that. But perhaps it's because she saves true intimacy for one person alone.Herself."The greatest relationship we have is with ourselves," says Phylicia Rashad, more widely known as Clair Huxtable of "The Cosby Show."The elegant, long-legged actress was at the College of Notre Dame last night to speak not so much about herself as about the Self, "with a capital S." A decade-long adherent of a form of meditation known as Siddha -- which translates to "perfect self" -- Ms. Rashad could be a poster child for the benefits of this practice.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2014
At their teacher's suggestion, some Centennial High School students are closing their eyes in class and taking their minds off academic subjects. They are relaxing instead of sitting tensely on the edge of their chairs. And they are thinking positive thoughts instead of stressing over a coming test, a lower-than-expected grade, or a social or emotional challenge they may be facing in one of Howard County's many top-performing schools. To help them feel grounded, they are focusing on their breathing and their feet.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2014
After 20 students assumed a meditative position with feet flat on the floor, backs straight, and eyes closed or gazes averted, Stan Eisenstein began preparing them to absorb meditation and mindfulness teachings during a recent class. "Get a sense of yourself, here in this room," he instructed the group. "Bring your awareness right here, right now. "You've been running around school all day. Feel yourself sitting in your chair, and get a little bit of a sense of your mood and feelings right this minute.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | January 6, 2014
Thirty-minute bouts of daily meditation can help ease symptoms of anxiety and depression, a new Johns Hopkins Medicine analysis has found. Researchers at Hopkins analyzed previous studies and found that meditation seemed to provide as much relief for people with mild anxiety and depression as antidepressants. The researchers looked at 47 clinical trials performed through June 2013 involving 3,515 patients. The studies focused on the impact of meditation on mental and physical health issues, including depression, anxiety, stress, insomnia, diabetes, heart disease, cancer and chronic pain.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | October 2, 2013
Today we revisit one of my favorite topics. Tomatoes. I bet you thought I was going to write about the government shutdown, but giving Congress ink is like giving a fool a microphone. So let's talk about tomatoes. I went to my favorite farmers' market in Annapolis this weekend and greedily filled my basket. I am hoarding against the possibility that a sudden storm will arrive and, although we need the rain, cause the last tomatoes in the field to swell and split and rot. The drought actually has been a boon to us tomato lovers.
NEWS
June 21, 2013
"Let's Move and Keep Moving Laurel," a free summer wellness series, brings yoga outdoors on Saturday, June 22 at 1 p.m. at the stage area of McCullough Field, Eighth and Montgomery streets. Carl Powell, the city's health and wellness ambassador and owner of the Magnificent Body offers a rejuvenating yoga flow and meditation for body, mind and spirit. Bring a mat, blanket, friend and the kids.
NEWS
March 22, 2013
Chanting, meditation An "Evening of Chanting and Meditation," led by Rufus Juskus, will be held beginning at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, March 30, at the Yoga Center of Columbia, 8950 Route 108, Suite 109. The evening consists of chanting in Sanskrit and English with meditation. Free, however, a love offering is requested. Information: 443-745-5855. Art exhibits •The Artists' Gallery's annual "Poets and Painters" exhibit will be on view through Friday, March 29, in the American City Building, 10227 Wincopin Circle in Columbia.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 28, 2003
FOR DECADES, open-minded Westerners - patients and doctors alike - have been touting the medical benefits of meditation. It has been shown to lower blood pressure, heart rate and respiration; to reduce anxiety, anger, hostility and mild to moderate depression; to help alleviate insomnia, premenstrual syndrome, hot flashes and infertility; and to relieve some types of pain, most notably tension headaches. What nobody has come close to explaining is how meditation might work. That is, what mechanisms within the brain might explain why changing one's mental focus can have such large effects on mood and metabolism.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 15, 2005
So there we sat, 28 of us, on a recent summer evening, munching ever so slowly on, and paying exquisite attention to, the surprisingly complex tastes and textures of gorp, that mixture of dried fruit and nuts so popular with hikers. "Notice whether you're already salivating," prompted the workshop instructor, Jean Fain, a psychotherapist and teaching associate at Harvard Medical School, as we held our chosen dried cranberries, cashews or almonds in our fingers. "Slowly, very slowly, begin to notice the taste, the texture.
EXPLORE
L'Oreal Thompson | October 4, 2012
In today's high-tech world, it's easy to forget to unplug and unwind. If you're in need of a mental break, check out the drop-in meditation classes run by the Kadampa Meditation Center, a nonprofit Buddhist organization - the only one of its kind in Harford County. “In our busy, often distracted daily lives, meditation is an essential tool for helping to develop mindfulness, focus, and a healthy mental perspective on daily life,” says Kelsang Menla, administrative director for the center.
EXPLORE
By Cheryl Clemens | January 25, 2012
To understand the impact meditation can have on the human mind, picture a glass of muddy water. If you stir it, the water stays cloudy and anything that might sink to the bottom is instantly sucked back into motion. But if you allow the glass to become still, slowly the dirt settles to the bottom and the water begins to clear. Meditation means different things to different people, but most agree that it is a means of quieting the mind, of stilling the parade of daily distractions and becoming less reactive to the stimulation that assaults our senses and emotions every waking hour.
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