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By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | December 26, 1990
Ninety percent of the elderly who subscribe to Blue Cross and Blue Shield's "medigap" coverage face increases of less than 3 percent now that Maryland Insurance Commissioner John A. Donaho has approved them.The increases, announced by the Insurance Division today, will go into effect Tuesday. They will affect 105,000 Marylanders who have Blue Cross Medicare supplemental policies, which pay various expenses not covered by Medicare.Garry V. Raim, director of marketing for Blue Cross' individual market division, said today the insurer is "concerned" about the decision.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 7, 2004
WASHINGTON - The nation's insurance commissioners say the Bush administration has made misleading statements about the new Medicare drug benefit in an effort to persuade people to sign up. The National Association of Insurance Commissioners, which represents insurance regulators in all 50 states, registered its concern in a letter to the federal Medicare agency. State officials elaborated on their concerns in recent interviews. If private insurers made such statements about their products, the association said, state officials would investigate their marketing practices for possible violation of consumer protection laws.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,Evening Sun Staff | November 26, 1991
State regulators today awarded Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland rate increases ranging from 8.4 to l5.4 percent in premiums paid by approximately 105,000 Medicare policyholders. The new rates take effect Jan. 1.The Maryland Insurance Division approved the rate increase following a hearing earlier this month at which opponents complained that health insurance costs were already cutting too deeply into their fixed incomes.The adjustments affect those residents who are enrolled in so-called medigap programs, which include standard, choice, basic and premium coverage.
NEWS
March 30, 2003
MARYLAND STEELWORKERS, who contributed so much to the building of America, are leading the nation down another arduous path. They are in the vanguard of American workers and retirees on the verge of losing their employer-subsidized health insurance. But the politicians rushing to their aid should be looking for solutions with wider application. Given the state of the economy and the growing cost of health care, this is a problem that likely won't end with the financial collapse of Bethlehem Steel.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | November 24, 1995
Seniors, worried about possible cutbacks in the federal Medicare program, face a more immediate problem -- increased costs for "Medigap" health insurance.Prudential, the largest Medigap group insurer in Maryland, with 42,000 policies sold in the state under contract with the American Association of Retired Persons, sent out notices this month of rate increases in Maryland averaging 16 percent, effective in January.And Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland, the largest individual Medigap insurer in the state, is requesting rate increases averaging about 12 percent for its 94,000 policyholders.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 7, 2004
WASHINGTON - The nation's insurance commissioners say the Bush administration has made misleading statements about the new Medicare drug benefit in an effort to persuade people to sign up. The National Association of Insurance Commissioners, which represents insurance regulators in all 50 states, registered its concern in a letter to the federal Medicare agency. State officials elaborated on their concerns in recent interviews. If private insurers made such statements about their products, the association said, state officials would investigate their marketing practices for possible violation of consumer protection laws.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1998
Three congressmen whose districts include parts of Baltimore met yesterday with about 75 senior citizens who voiced concerns about Medicare HMO pullouts.Seniors are worried primarily about finding a plan that would cover the costs of prescriptions, said Jean Booker Bradley, chairwoman of the health committee for the Historic East Baltimore Community Action Coalition (HEBCAC)."We need some help," she added.Medicare HMOs have been offering a prescription benefit, but four are pulling out of the market or limiting coverage effective Jan. 1, leaving about 35,000 Maryland seniors looking for new health plans.
NEWS
October 17, 1990
If you're a senior citizen in Baltimore County who needs help with medical-insurance forms, the Senior Health Insurance Counseling Program is providing a free service.The program is offered at the following senior centers: Arbutus (887-1444); Ateaze (887-7233); Bykota (887-3094); Catonsville (887-0900); Dundalk (887-7221); Lansdowne (887-1443); Liberty (887-0780); Loch Raven (887-5356); Lutherville (887-7694).Also at Overlea (887-5220); Parkville (887-5338); Perry Hall (887-5092); Pikesville (887-1245)
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | December 12, 1990
Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland's request to raise rates by 10.3 to 20.9 percent for so-called "medigap" coverage for the elderly was met with skepticism by Insurance Division officials."
NEWS
By S. S. Neumann | October 26, 1993
ALL signs indicate that President Clinton will try to put a cap on Medicare.Please, Bill, don't do that until you find out how shamefully inadequate Medicare reimbursement to patients already is.A few years ago I retired after 35 years in the work force, including 11 years at each of my last two employers. I got a small lump-sum payout from a 401(k) plan, but no pension and no medical benefits.I signed up for Medicare, Parts A and B. (Later I winced upon learning that the premiums for Part B, which covers doctors' bills, will increase by 15 percent this year.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | November 17, 2000
At 70, Berdina Williams of Columbia is worried about how much she will have to pay for health insurance when her health maintenance organization ends coverage for Medicare recipients in six weeks. Richard Tennant, 76, of Ellicott City wonders if treatment begun under an HMO will continue once it closes shop in Maryland on Dec. 31. They aren't alone. About 2,300 seniors in Howard County are covered by HMOs, and many of them are working to sift through the confusing thicket of rules, regulations and sales pitches to choose care they can afford in 2001.
NEWS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | October 8, 2000
With the departure of three more Medicare HMOs from the Maryland market at the end of the year, about 55,000 seniors in the state are looking for other types of health coverage. For most, that means Medigap policies, which get their name from the fact that they fill in the gaps - deductibles, co-payments and uncovered services - in regular Medicare. Experts agree that nearly all seniors should have a Medigap policy, unless they receive additional health coverage from other sources, such as employer-provided retiree insurance or veterans benefits.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2000
Marylanders covered by Medicare pay less than seniors in most other states for Medigap insurance policies, according to a study released yesterday by Weiss Ratings Inc., a Florida company that monitors the solvency of insurers. On average, Maryland seniors pay $594 a year for Medigap "Plan A" insurance, a no-frills policy - lower than consumers in every state but Utah and about half the rate in Florida or New York, according to the Weiss study. Medigap policies, already popular, may prove increasingly important as Medicare HMOs withdraw from the market, saying they are losing money.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1998
Three congressmen whose districts include parts of Baltimore met yesterday with about 75 senior citizens who voiced concerns about Medicare HMO pullouts.Seniors are worried primarily about finding a plan that would cover the costs of prescriptions, said Jean Booker Bradley, chairwoman of the health committee for the Historic East Baltimore Community Action Coalition (HEBCAC)."We need some help," she added.Medicare HMOs have been offering a prescription benefit, but four are pulling out of the market or limiting coverage effective Jan. 1, leaving about 35,000 Maryland seniors looking for new health plans.
BUSINESS
By Jane Bryant Quinn and Jane Bryant Quinn,Washington Post Writers Group | July 13, 1998
I CAN TELL you how to find the cheapest possible Medigap insurance policy. But I have to pass on a warning first:The policies that are low-priced when you're 65 will be hugely expensive when you're 85. You might have to drop them because they cost too much. That's something you need to consider at the very start.Medigap insurance is private coverage that picks up some of the bills that Medicare doesn't pay. By law, there are only 10 standard policies for most states (three states have different policies: Massachusetts, Minnesota and Wisconsin)
BUSINESS
By Jane Bryant Quinn and Jane Bryant Quinn,Washington Post Writers Group | April 14, 1997
SOLID evidence exists that for some patients, health maintenance organizations (HMOs) can be hazardous to health. They don't take good care of the most vulnerable among the sick.In a recent study of the chronically ill, the elderly and the sickest poor fared much worse in three urban HMOs than their counterparts did in traditional health plans, reports John Ware, senior scientist at Boston's New England Medical Center.On the other hand, younger patients in his study -- who had higher average incomes and whose chronic illnesses weren't as bad -- did just as well in the HMOs and at lower cost.
BUSINESS
By Jane Bryant Quinn and Jane Bryant Quinn,Washington Post Writers Group | April 14, 1997
SOLID evidence exists that for some patients, health maintenance organizations (HMOs) can be hazardous to health. They don't take good care of the most vulnerable among the sick.In a recent study of the chronically ill, the elderly and the sickest poor fared much worse in three urban HMOs than their counterparts did in traditional health plans, reports John Ware, senior scientist at Boston's New England Medical Center.On the other hand, younger patients in his study -- who had higher average incomes and whose chronic illnesses weren't as bad -- did just as well in the HMOs and at lower cost.
NEWS
March 30, 2003
MARYLAND STEELWORKERS, who contributed so much to the building of America, are leading the nation down another arduous path. They are in the vanguard of American workers and retirees on the verge of losing their employer-subsidized health insurance. But the politicians rushing to their aid should be looking for solutions with wider application. Given the state of the economy and the growing cost of health care, this is a problem that likely won't end with the financial collapse of Bethlehem Steel.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 20, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Adding new fuel to the budget debate, the largest suppliers of private health insurance supplements to Medicare said yesterday that their premiums would rise by an average of 30 percent next year.The increase was disclosed by the American Association of Retired Persons and Prudential Insurance Company of America, which provides supplemental coverage to 3.1 million members of the association.Other companies are also raising premiums for these policies, which help fill gaps in Medicare by paying hospital charges, doctors' bills and other expenses not covered by the government program.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | November 24, 1995
Seniors, worried about possible cutbacks in the federal Medicare program, face a more immediate problem -- increased costs for "Medigap" health insurance.Prudential, the largest Medigap group insurer in Maryland, with 42,000 policies sold in the state under contract with the American Association of Retired Persons, sent out notices this month of rate increases in Maryland averaging 16 percent, effective in January.And Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland, the largest individual Medigap insurer in the state, is requesting rate increases averaging about 12 percent for its 94,000 policyholders.
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