Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMedieval Times
IN THE NEWS

Medieval Times

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2003
Having stepped 1,000 years or so back in time - back to when kings ruled the land, damsels were fair, and forks apparently were hard to come by - I waiteth patiently, a paper crown atop my head, for my authentic medieval feast. It will come in four courses, all to be served as I view the colorful pageantry of the jousting tournament in the arena below, all to be heartily devoured with but my hands, and all to be washed down with cold beverage. "Pepsi or iced tea?" my pitcher-toting serf inquires.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Coward and Kevin Coward,kevin.cowherd@baltsun.com | February 8, 2009
The last time I was at Arundel Mills, I was stuffing hunks of roasted chicken into my fat face and watching knights on horseback joust in front of a roaring crowd while a comely wench kept coming up to my table and saying: "More to drink, sire?" Oh, do I know how to live or what? This was last year at Medieval Times, where these feast-and-fighting extravaganzas are held in a replica of an 11th-century castle and tickets are $50.95 for adults, which doesn't exactly sound like a bargain in this economy.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2003
For $45.95, you'll get a four-course meal at the Medieval Times Dinner & Tournament about to open at Arundel Mills, but not a fork or knife with which to eat it. Slated to open Aug. 22 at the sprawling shopping complex in Anne Arundel County, the restaurant takes diners back a thousand years to when kings ruled from castles, princesses waited for their knights in shining armor and people ate with their hands. To truly experience the era, diners use their fingers to eat ribs, roasted chicken and herb-basted potatoes served by "wenches" and "serfs" in peasant clothes.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | June 22, 2008
Thirteen Harford County children conjured up a week in the Middle Ages. One day they learned about peasants and royalty, and made tunics, crowns and orbs. Another day they mixed berries to make ink, carved stone, and made a lantern from tin. And another day they made castles that included arrow loops, crenels, merlons, turrets, and a drawbridge. The camp culminated with a feast where the children ate with their hands. "My goal is to give the children an understanding of what life was like during medieval times," said Margaret Ann Knaub, of Elkton, who taught the program.
TRAVEL
By Lorraine Mirabella | October 3, 1999
On a rare sun-soaked summer day in Edinburgh, the mood turned festive along the steep, cobbled streets of the Royal Mile.Visitors thronged the sidewalks, shedding jackets -- standard garb in a place where locals joke that summer came on a Wednesday last year. Tourists strolled in and out of pubs, museums and shops. University students with matching haircuts and sun-reddened faces broke out singing as they strode along in groups.Outside St. Giles Cathedral, a lone bagpiper played for the tourists.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | October 23, 2002
Arundel Mills is about to become the first U.S. mall where shoppers can load up on shoes, towels and saute pans by day, then settle down to an 11th-century banquet and jousting match. At Medieval Times Dinner & Tournament, one of the last anchors opening at the huge Hanover mall, guests will be addressed as "My Lord" or "My Lady," "knights" on horseback will wield swords, and Andalusian stallions will prance in choreographed routines. Construction will begin this week on the 1,000-seat, medieval-themed restaurant, where knights will joust in tournaments during nightly two-hour performances.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey | March 24, 2005
Guitar master Via This one is for everyone out there who's taken a guitar lesson (or wished he or she had). Guitar master Steve Via will roll into Rams Head Live for a show tonight. Via played in bands with Frank Zappa and David Lee Roth. He also rocked with Whitesnake. Via's one-time guitar teacher (and high school friend) Eric Sardinas will also play. Doors open at 6 p.m. Sardinas plays at 8 p.m. and Via goes on at 9 p.m. Tickets are $25 in advance and $28 the day of the show. 21 and over only.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | December 21, 1995
In medieval times, the nobility were a warrior class, and even in peacetime they honed their combative skills with hunting and warlike games. Among them was jousting, as shown on this ivory box lid from 14th-century France. It's one of the works in the Walters Art Gallery's exhibit "Medieval Games of Love and War," which brings together manuscripts and other objects to show the games people played back when. The show encompasses everything from chess to hawking to dancing.At the Walters Art Gallery, 600 N. Charles St., through Feb. 18. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Sundays.
NEWS
By EDEN UNGER BOWDITCH and EDEN UNGER BOWDITCH,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 8, 2006
Mateo Warres Head squire Medieval Times, Arundel Mills Age --27 Years on the job --Three Salary --$10 to $12 to start, up to $25 with experience and knighthood How he started --Medieval Times, an entertainment venue that includes jousting matches among knights on horses, was having tryouts at his gym. "I thought, `Hey, I've never been to Texas.' It sounded like [training] would be a six-week vacation." Training --Two months at Medieval Times' Chapel Creek Ranch - a 241-acre spot about an hour from Dallas.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2003
COMING UP Jousting is Maryland's official state sport, so it was probably inevitable that the eighth Medieval Times Dinner and Tournament would come here. The attraction, which opens Aug. 22 in a 60,000-square-foot "castle" at Arundel Mills, feeds guests a four-course meal while they watch knights joust and compete in games of skill. As many as 1,000 people can come to each performance to watch the knights and the Andalusian and Friesian stallions. Medieval Times is located at Arundel Mills, 7000 Arundel Mills Circle, Hanover.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | March 3, 2008
Let me begin by saying how lucky we are to live in an area where you can visit a replica of an 11th-century castle and feast on hunks of roasted chicken while knights on horseback joust and sword fight and a comely wench keeps coming up to your table and saying: "More to drink, sire?" Until the other night, however, I had not availed myself of this particular pleasure, owing to one major factor: Tickets are $50.95 each for adults. And I'm too cheap to fork over that kind of iron for anything less than Springsteen singing while I eat. Then Medieval Times Dinner and Tournament, the company that puts on these feasting-and-fighting extravaganzas in nine cities around the country, held a "Media Night" at its sprawling Arundel Mills site to preview its new show, billed as a "spell-binding evening of royal entertainment!"
NEWS
By EDEN UNGER BOWDITCH and EDEN UNGER BOWDITCH,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 8, 2006
Mateo Warres Head squire Medieval Times, Arundel Mills Age --27 Years on the job --Three Salary --$10 to $12 to start, up to $25 with experience and knighthood How he started --Medieval Times, an entertainment venue that includes jousting matches among knights on horses, was having tryouts at his gym. "I thought, `Hey, I've never been to Texas.' It sounded like [training] would be a six-week vacation." Training --Two months at Medieval Times' Chapel Creek Ranch - a 241-acre spot about an hour from Dallas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey | March 24, 2005
Guitar master Via This one is for everyone out there who's taken a guitar lesson (or wished he or she had). Guitar master Steve Via will roll into Rams Head Live for a show tonight. Via played in bands with Frank Zappa and David Lee Roth. He also rocked with Whitesnake. Via's one-time guitar teacher (and high school friend) Eric Sardinas will also play. Doors open at 6 p.m. Sardinas plays at 8 p.m. and Via goes on at 9 p.m. Tickets are $25 in advance and $28 the day of the show. 21 and over only.
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2003
Having stepped 1,000 years or so back in time - back to when kings ruled the land, damsels were fair, and forks apparently were hard to come by - I waiteth patiently, a paper crown atop my head, for my authentic medieval feast. It will come in four courses, all to be served as I view the colorful pageantry of the jousting tournament in the arena below, all to be heartily devoured with but my hands, and all to be washed down with cold beverage. "Pepsi or iced tea?" my pitcher-toting serf inquires.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2003
For $45.95, you'll get a four-course meal at the Medieval Times Dinner & Tournament about to open at Arundel Mills, but not a fork or knife with which to eat it. Slated to open Aug. 22 at the sprawling shopping complex in Anne Arundel County, the restaurant takes diners back a thousand years to when kings ruled from castles, princesses waited for their knights in shining armor and people ate with their hands. To truly experience the era, diners use their fingers to eat ribs, roasted chicken and herb-basted potatoes served by "wenches" and "serfs" in peasant clothes.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2003
COMING UP Jousting is Maryland's official state sport, so it was probably inevitable that the eighth Medieval Times Dinner and Tournament would come here. The attraction, which opens Aug. 22 in a 60,000-square-foot "castle" at Arundel Mills, feeds guests a four-course meal while they watch knights joust and compete in games of skill. As many as 1,000 people can come to each performance to watch the knights and the Andalusian and Friesian stallions. Medieval Times is located at Arundel Mills, 7000 Arundel Mills Circle, Hanover.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | March 3, 2008
Let me begin by saying how lucky we are to live in an area where you can visit a replica of an 11th-century castle and feast on hunks of roasted chicken while knights on horseback joust and sword fight and a comely wench keeps coming up to your table and saying: "More to drink, sire?" Until the other night, however, I had not availed myself of this particular pleasure, owing to one major factor: Tickets are $50.95 each for adults. And I'm too cheap to fork over that kind of iron for anything less than Springsteen singing while I eat. Then Medieval Times Dinner and Tournament, the company that puts on these feasting-and-fighting extravaganzas in nine cities around the country, held a "Media Night" at its sprawling Arundel Mills site to preview its new show, billed as a "spell-binding evening of royal entertainment!"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Coward and Kevin Coward,kevin.cowherd@baltsun.com | February 8, 2009
The last time I was at Arundel Mills, I was stuffing hunks of roasted chicken into my fat face and watching knights on horseback joust in front of a roaring crowd while a comely wench kept coming up to my table and saying: "More to drink, sire?" Oh, do I know how to live or what? This was last year at Medieval Times, where these feast-and-fighting extravaganzas are held in a replica of an 11th-century castle and tickets are $50.95 for adults, which doesn't exactly sound like a bargain in this economy.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | October 23, 2002
Arundel Mills is about to become the first U.S. mall where shoppers can load up on shoes, towels and saute pans by day, then settle down to an 11th-century banquet and jousting match. At Medieval Times Dinner & Tournament, one of the last anchors opening at the huge Hanover mall, guests will be addressed as "My Lord" or "My Lady," "knights" on horseback will wield swords, and Andalusian stallions will prance in choreographed routines. Construction will begin this week on the 1,000-seat, medieval-themed restaurant, where knights will joust in tournaments during nightly two-hour performances.
NEWS
By Diana Digges and Diana Digges,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 26, 1999
SANTIAGO DE COMPOSTELA, Spain -- As in the Middle Ages, so at the turn of the millennium: The price of praying with your feet is swollen ankles, tendinitis and blisters.Nevertheless, the Camino de Santiago -- the Way of St. James, a pilgrimage trail across northern Spain -- is enjoying its greatest revival since the Middle Ages.Pilgrims come to Santiago from all continents. They cross the Pyrenees into Roncesvalles, the site of the eighth-century battle immortalized in the "Chanson de Roland" and the start of the main branch of the trail in northern Spain.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.