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February 4, 1996
The Palmer Museum of Art in University Park, Pa., presents "Medieval Art in America: Patterns of Collecting 1800-1940" through March 3.The exhibition presents an overview of the collecting of medieval art in the United States from 1800 to 1940.The museum will also conclude its film and lecture series today and Feb. 10.The lecture, "The Legacy of Ornament: Searching in the Glencairn Museum," will take place at 2 p.m. today. And the film, "Christians, Jews and Moslems in Spain," will be shown at 2 p.m. Feb. 10.The Palmer Museum of Art is on Curtin Road next to the creamery on the Penn State University Park campus.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2012
Next weekend, visitors to the Baltimore Art Museum's newly renovated Contemporary Wing may find themselves staring up at a hole in the ceiling, their mouths gaping open like fish. They'll have been hooked by a central feature of the $6.5 million building project - artist Sarah Oppenheimer's playful, gravity-defying illusion with the enigmatic name "W-120301. " And who would blame them for staring? How often can we watch someone appear to walk up a wall? Oppenheimer knocked holes in walls and cut through ceiling to change the architecture of the Baltimore Museum of Art . And, that's not a bad metaphor for museum director Doreen Bolger's goal to knock down the walls between the museum and the community.
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NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Staff Writer | November 19, 1992
In an obituary yesterday on Dr. Eleanor P. Spencer, the name of author Richard H. Howland was misspelled.The Sun regrets the error.Dr. Eleanor P. Spencer -- known to scholars for her expertise in illuminated medieval manuscripts and cherished by friends for a radiant personality -- died Tuesday at a nursing home outside Paris. She was 97.Dr. Spencer was considered one of the most distinguished American scholars of medieval art.Her specialty and passion were medieval manuscripts of the late 15th century, mostly prayer books.
EXPLORE
August 8, 2011
Submit notices via email: messenger@patuxent.com ; fax: 410-332-6336; or mail: Baltimore Messenger, 501 N. Calvert St., Third Floor, Baltimore, MD 21278. Include sponsor or host, date, time, address of event, contact name and phone number. Deadline is noon the Thursday before publication. Arts and Museums The Walters Art Museum - 600 N. Charles St. 410-547-9000, http://www.thewalters.org. • The Art of the Writing Instrument from Paris to Persia, through Sept.
FEATURES
January 28, 1996
The Palmer Museum of Art, University Park, Pa., presents "Medieval Art in America: Patterns of Collecting 1800-1940" through March 3. The exhibition presents an overview of the collecting of medieval art in the United States from 1800 to 1940.The museum also presents a series of films and lectures. Films in its "Europe in the Middle Ages" series: "The Feudal System," 2 p.m. Feb. 3; and "Christians, Jews and Moslems in Spain," 2 p.m. Feb. 10. Lectures include: "Stained Glass From Chartres Cathedral at Princeton University," 2 p.m. Jan. 28, and "The Legacy of Ornament: Searching in the Glencairn Museum," 2 p.m. Feb. 4. The museum is on Curtin Road on the Penn State University Park campus.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2000
The Churches of Charles, an annual series of lectures sponsored by churches in North Baltimore along and near Charles Street, will focus this year on how faith is reflected in various art forms. The lectures, "Religion and Art: Faith Taking Form," will examine how Christians have given form to their faith using music, drama and varieties of visual art. The first lecture is planned for 11 a.m. Sept. 27 at the Walters Art Gallery, 600 N. Charles St. A tour will explore religion in the Walters collection.
NEWS
October 10, 1990
Andre Grabar, 94, an internationally known expert on Byzantine art, died Friday at his home in Paris. An author, lecturer, and archaeologist, he was born in Kiev, Ukraine, and educated in St. Petersburg. In 1928 he earned a Ph.D. in Byzantine art from the University of Strasbourg, France. He taught art history there until 1937 and at the Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes in Paris until 1966. He was also a professor of early Christian and Byzantine archaeology at the College de France in Paris from 1946 to 1966, and a research professor at Dumbarton Oaks Institute of Harvard University from 1950 to 1964.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | November 7, 1993
Sometimes even museums don't know what they have.When Baltimore scholar and former director of the Walters Art Gallery Richard Randall was working on his just-published book about medieval ivories in American collections, he sent out questionnaires to museums all over the country asking if they had any."I got a reply from the Los Angeles County Museum of Art saying they only had one, and it was a fake," Mr. Randall recalls. "Not worth my time. But a fake can be interesting, too, so I called and told them I was going to be in the area at such and such a time, and I'd like to see it."
FEATURES
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | January 4, 1998
The Walters Art Gallery has received four grants, totaling $840,000, from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Getty Grant Program and the Samuel H. Kress Foundation.The grants are earmarked to support ancient and medieval art collections at the Walters."While public funding for the arts continues to be the subject of much scrutiny, these resources are invaluable for the Walters to uphold its vital role in the national cultural community," said Walters director Gary Vikan.
NEWS
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | July 5, 1997
In the art world, there are scholars and administrators.Richard H. Randall Jr., who died this week, was both. The former Walters Art Gallery director combined a vast knowledge of medieval art with a canny ability to manage administrative details, large and small. Under his direction, the Walters tripled in size, growing from a quiet institution to a popular public destination.Mr. Randall, 71, collapsed and died of heart failure Thursday while doing errands near his Roland Park home.As director of the Walters from 1965 to 1981, Mr. Randall brought about a major expansion of the museum on Mount Vernon Place in downtown Baltimore after other attempts failed.
EXPLORE
August 4, 2011
Submit notices via email: messenger@patuxent.com ; fax: 410-332-6336; or mail: Baltimore Messenger, 501 N. Calvert St., Third Floor, Baltimore, MD 21278. Include sponsor or host, date, time, address of event, contact name and phone number. Deadline is noon the Thursday before publication. Arts and Museums The Walters Art Museum - 600 N. Charles St. 410-547-9000, http://www.thewalters.org. • The Art of the Writing Instrument from Paris to Persia, through Sept.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | May 14, 2004
The chess queen's head peers out from her ivory castle as if she has grown too large for a structure that once protected her. She reminds you of something fragile and emergent but determined, like a newborn bird, a turtle, or even (the topic on everyone's mind these days) a cicada. Children think she's riding in a bumper car. The analogies fit. When the particular queen pictured here was created in 12th-century Spain, the game of chess - like the social hierarchies it models - was in transition.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2000
The Churches of Charles, an annual series of lectures sponsored by churches in North Baltimore along and near Charles Street, will focus this year on how faith is reflected in various art forms. The lectures, "Religion and Art: Faith Taking Form," will examine how Christians have given form to their faith using music, drama and varieties of visual art. The first lecture is planned for 11 a.m. Sept. 27 at the Walters Art Gallery, 600 N. Charles St. A tour will explore religion in the Walters collection.
FEATURES
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | January 4, 1998
The Walters Art Gallery has received four grants, totaling $840,000, from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Getty Grant Program and the Samuel H. Kress Foundation.The grants are earmarked to support ancient and medieval art collections at the Walters."While public funding for the arts continues to be the subject of much scrutiny, these resources are invaluable for the Walters to uphold its vital role in the national cultural community," said Walters director Gary Vikan.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 11, 1997
They look as old as the Middle Ages and as young as the 20th century. And the concept behind them may sound strange, but it's really no stranger than saying, "God bless you.""Art That Heals," the exhibit opening at the Walters Art Gallery tomorrow, features centuries-old Ethiopian scrolls, made of words and images meant to magically combat illness.With their colorful hand-drawn pictures and handwritten text, the scrolls are like the medieval manuscripts in the Walters' own world-renowned collection.
NEWS
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | July 5, 1997
In the art world, there are scholars and administrators.Richard H. Randall Jr., who died this week, was both. The former Walters Art Gallery director combined a vast knowledge of medieval art with a canny ability to manage administrative details, large and small. Under his direction, the Walters tripled in size, growing from a quiet institution to a popular public destination.Mr. Randall, 71, collapsed and died of heart failure Thursday while doing errands near his Roland Park home.As director of the Walters from 1965 to 1981, Mr. Randall brought about a major expansion of the museum on Mount Vernon Place in downtown Baltimore after other attempts failed.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 11, 1997
They look as old as the Middle Ages and as young as the 20th century. And the concept behind them may sound strange, but it's really no stranger than saying, "God bless you.""Art That Heals," the exhibit opening at the Walters Art Gallery tomorrow, features centuries-old Ethiopian scrolls, made of words and images meant to magically combat illness.With their colorful hand-drawn pictures and handwritten text, the scrolls are like the medieval manuscripts in the Walters' own world-renowned collection.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2012
Next weekend, visitors to the Baltimore Art Museum's newly renovated Contemporary Wing may find themselves staring up at a hole in the ceiling, their mouths gaping open like fish. They'll have been hooked by a central feature of the $6.5 million building project - artist Sarah Oppenheimer's playful, gravity-defying illusion with the enigmatic name "W-120301. " And who would blame them for staring? How often can we watch someone appear to walk up a wall? Oppenheimer knocked holes in walls and cut through ceiling to change the architecture of the Baltimore Museum of Art . And, that's not a bad metaphor for museum director Doreen Bolger's goal to knock down the walls between the museum and the community.
FEATURES
February 4, 1996
The Palmer Museum of Art in University Park, Pa., presents "Medieval Art in America: Patterns of Collecting 1800-1940" through March 3.The exhibition presents an overview of the collecting of medieval art in the United States from 1800 to 1940.The museum will also conclude its film and lecture series today and Feb. 10.The lecture, "The Legacy of Ornament: Searching in the Glencairn Museum," will take place at 2 p.m. today. And the film, "Christians, Jews and Moslems in Spain," will be shown at 2 p.m. Feb. 10.The Palmer Museum of Art is on Curtin Road next to the creamery on the Penn State University Park campus.
FEATURES
January 28, 1996
The Palmer Museum of Art, University Park, Pa., presents "Medieval Art in America: Patterns of Collecting 1800-1940" through March 3. The exhibition presents an overview of the collecting of medieval art in the United States from 1800 to 1940.The museum also presents a series of films and lectures. Films in its "Europe in the Middle Ages" series: "The Feudal System," 2 p.m. Feb. 3; and "Christians, Jews and Moslems in Spain," 2 p.m. Feb. 10. Lectures include: "Stained Glass From Chartres Cathedral at Princeton University," 2 p.m. Jan. 28, and "The Legacy of Ornament: Searching in the Glencairn Museum," 2 p.m. Feb. 4. The museum is on Curtin Road on the Penn State University Park campus.
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