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By David Horsey | July 10, 2012
In the mid-1980s when I was a graduate student in England, my parents came to visit and my mother ended up getting a first-hand look at socialized medicine. It was dad and mom's one-and-only trip to Europe -- a very big deal -- and I wanted to show them as much as I could. We crossed the English Channel to France and drove to see the cathedral at Chartres. The first night there, mom slipped and sprained her ankle. By morning, she couldn't walk and was in need of a doctor. We ended up at a hospital where, with no wait at all, she got X-rays and a friendly, highly competent female doctor checked her out and wrapped her leg. As we were leaving, my mother asked where she should pay the bill.
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NEWS
August 27, 2014
A state commission meeting this week to draft rules governing access to medical marijuana by patients and physicians has left advocates for the drug's therapeutic use wondering whether it will ever become available to those who need it. The commissioners need to balance the scientific and medical issues raised by medical marijuana against the legal constraints imposed by state and federal statutes. But in trying to walk a fine line between the two, the panel appears to have crafted rules that in some instances are so restrictive that many patients with illnesses that could be treated with the drug may never be able to get it. That would defeat the whole purpose of Maryland's medical marijuana law, which has already been delayed once since its passage in 2013.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | March 13, 2012
The U.S. New & World Report graduate school rankings  are out and Johns Hopkins University has moved up from 3rd to a tie for 2nd with the University of Pennsylvania. They were behind top-ranked Harvard University. But they beat out Stanford University and the University of California-San Francisco. The University of Maryland was tied for 37th with Oregon Health and Science University, moving up one slot from 38th. There were 126 accredited medical schools and 23 accredited osteopathic medicine schools included in the rankings.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
Dr. Thomas F. "Tim" Herbert, a well-known Howard County physician who practiced family medicine in Ellicott City for 40 years, died Sunday of cancer at William Hill Manor in Easton. He was 86. "Tim was such a wonderful guy and he was wonderful to me," said Dr. Harry C. Knipp, a radiologist and longtime friend. "He lived and practiced medicine in the home he grew up in that overlooked Ellicott City. " The son of Dr. Alpha Nathan Herbert, a physician, and Dorothy Kraft Herbert, a registered nurse, Thomas Franklyn Herbert, who was known as "Tim," was born in Baltimore and raised in Ellicott City.
EXPLORE
October 3, 2012
The BWI Business Partnership's Signature Breakfast will be held Wednesday, Oct. 17, from 7:45 to 9:15 a.m., at the Westin BWI Airport Hotel, 1110 Old Elkridge Landing Road, in Linthicum Heights. Featured speaker at the breakfast will be E. Albert Reece, dean of the University of Maryland School of Medicine, which has close ties to the area's business community. Reece is also the vice president for medical affairs at the university and a professor in the departments of obstetrics and gynecology, medicine and biochemistry, and molecular biology.
NEWS
March 9, 2011
The Supreme Court's decision in the Westboro Baptist case follows our constitutional protections for free speech. Why don't people exercise that right by picketing there? Go to Westboro! Same-sex couples and veterans should join in a show of support for slain soldiers and denounce this bigotry with many rallies right on Westboro's doorsteps. Aren't there VFW's in Kansas? Where are they? Freedom of speech goes both ways. Ron Kuhns, Nottingham
NEWS
May 14, 2012
Thank you for writing the article shining a light on anti-choice people who harass and humiliate people and their families who are not breaking any laws ("Abortion fight widens," May 11). To think that these people would go to a man's middle-school aged daughter's school to defame the girl and her family because the girl's dad rents space to abortion providers is deplorable. These anti-choice fanatics should get a taste of their own medicine by receiving calls and visits to their neighborhoods and schools.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | March 7, 2010
A s the century's sleazy first decade coasted to a finish, medicine was perhaps the only profession to emerge unslimed. Wall Street and bond raters caused 10 percent unemployment. Businesses cooked books. Journalists fabricated. Priests abused. Intelligence analysts found fantasy nukes. But doctors, again near the top of last year's Gallup "honesty and ethics" poll, may be prepping for their own Enron moment. Allegations that hundreds of patients at St. Joseph Medical Center received what might have been unneeded heart stents would, if true, combine Bernard Madoff-style fraud with Toyota-style injury.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | November 29, 2012
A simple automated telephone call may be enough to convice people to take their medicine, a study by Kasier Permanente has found. As part of the study, an automated telephone call was made to patients on cholesteral-reducing drugs who hadn't picked up their medicine two weeks after it was prescribed. A letter was sent a week later if patients still hadn't filled their prescriptions. The calls and letters informed people about the importance of taking the medication and encouraged them to have prescription filled or to call their doctor.
NEWS
March 20, 2013
I was mildly distressed to read that the renowned Johns Hopkins Hospital neurosurgeon, Dr. Benjamin Carson, is considering a post-retirement career in politics ("Ben Carson says he will retire, hints at politics," March 17). I fully understand his desire to retire from what must be a physically, mentally and emotionally demanding profession. Nonetheless, consider how much good he has done and could continue to do if he decided to pursue a direction that enables him to pass on his skills and to advise on medical matters.
NEWS
By Nina Miller | June 4, 2014
In March, Anne Arundel County was the first county in Maryland to put the powerful, lifesaving drug naloxone in the hands of its police officers. Naloxone is a safe and effective prescription medicine that reverses an opioid overdose. It can be administered via a simple nasal spray device. Emergency medical professionals have used it for decades, and recently more and more police departments across the country are equipping their officers with the skills and supplies necessary to administer this lifesaving treatment to people suffering from an opioid overdose.
NEWS
SPECIAL TO THE AEGIS | May 6, 2014
Josiah Taft of Edgewood is the first-place winner in a national patriotic essay contest sponsored by the National Society of Colonial Wars Inc. Josiah, the son of Brad and MaryAnn Taft, is 13 years old and in eighth grade. He has been home-schooled for eight years. The society annually sponsors an essay competition open to seventh- and eighth-graders. Essays are 250 to 500 words and are judged on subject matter, interest, spelling and punctuation. Each year a new topic is announced; this year's was Colonial Medicine.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
Dr. M. Daniel Lane, a retired Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine researcher, biochemist and esteemed teacher who studied the body's chemical processes that affect hunger, died of myeloma April 10 at the Charlestown Retirement Community. The former Mount Washington resident was 83. Colleagues said he typically arrived at his classroom at 6 a.m. and filled numerous sliding blackboards with notes for the day's material. These became known as the "Lane Lectures. " Dr. Paul Rothman, chief executive officer of Johns Hopkins Medicine and dean of the medical faculty, called Dr. Lane "a premier scientist and one of our most cherished colleagues.
NEWS
By Lane Page | April 1, 2014
Maria Trent lived in the Columbia neighborhood of Running Brook during the early 1970s while her dad worked on a doctorate at the University of Maryland, College Park, and her mom taught at Waterloo Elementary. She was just 3 years old when her family moved back to North Carolina, but she was destined to return to Howard County - after an extended academic detour took her from undergrad at Yale to University of North Carolina Medical School, to a pediatric residency at Children's National Medical Center in D.C. and earning a master's degree in public health from Harvard.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2014
Dr. Raymond Seltser, former associate dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health who was the author of seminal epidemiological articles on smoking, stroke and radiation, died Feb. 16 of pneumonia at Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington. He was 90. The son of a tailor and a homemaker, Raymond Seltser was born and raised in Boston. He graduated from Boston Latin School in 1941. "His parents expected him to go into medicine, but he never wanted to practice," said a son, Barry Jay Seltser of Silver Spring.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
William A. Edelstein, a pioneer in the field of MRI who was also a professor in the radiology department at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, died Feb. 10 of lung cancer at his home in Original Northwood. He was 69. The son of Arthur Edelstein, an optometrist, and Hannah Edelstein, a homemaker, William AlanEdelstein was born in Gloversville, N.Y., and raised in Schenectady and Utica, N.Y., and Northbrook, Ill., where he graduated in 1961 from Glenbrook High School.
HEALTH
By Susan Reimer | March 11, 2010
M y husband the sports writer calls it "Team Reimer," and he says it has more members than the supporting casts behind any Olympic athlete he's ever covered. I tell him that if I was as young and fit as the athletes he writes about, I wouldn't need a team to keep me on the road. But I'm not, and so I have a yoga trainer, a massage therapist, the best hair-colorist in my town, a manicurist, a general practitioner to whom I am devoted and an aesthetician. Not that my husband knows what an aesthetician is. Now there is a new member of Team Reimer.
NEWS
October 28, 2013
Anne Arundel County Police say they took in about 351 pounds of unused medicine during the department's Prescription Drug Take Back initiative, held Oct. 26. The event was sponsored by the Drug Enforcement Administration and the Anne Arundel County Police Department. Police said several hundred bottles of expired and unused medications were collected at the county's four police districts. Officials also used the occasion to discuss how flushing unused medication in the toilet affects the water, septic systems, the environment and overall public safety; and the Anne Arundel County Health Department provided information on substance abuse prevention coalitions and treatment programs.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
Facing criticism from Baltimore and nearby counties over high drug bills, doctors who prescribe marked-up medication under Maryland's workers' compensation system have proposed capping their prescription fees. But the doctors' proposal would allow them to charge up to between 130 and 150 percent of pharmacy rates for drugs, plus a $12 fee for each prescription and a 20 percent penalty if counties don't pay — legislation that, if passed, municipalities say would cost them millions of dollars more than what pharmacies charge for pills.
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