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By Dan K. Morhaim | January 5, 2014
The patient was found by paramedics and rushed to the hospital. He had taken over 80 aspirin tablets of 500 mg each - more than enough to be lethal. The ER staff prepared to administer the standard treatment for aspirin poisoning: sodium bicarbonate. Yes, this is the same stuff seen in movies that anxious characters take to relieve stomach upset and is followed by a burp. Chemically it's a simple, inexpensive medication and has been used for decades. In this case, the bicarbonate is a sterile solution given intravenously.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
With Maryland's proposed licensing fees for growing and selling medical marijuana among the highest in the nation, some advocates warn that the steep costs could drive off applicants, crippling the nascent program and limiting access to treatment for tens of thousands of state residents. Prospective medical marijuana growers would have to pay $125,000 a year for a two-year license, while dispensaries would have to pay $40,000 a year, according to the recommendations of a state commission.
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HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | April 5, 2012
State health officials have issued an alert about Baczol, an unapproved medicine found in many Latino convenience stores. Concerns about the drug came to light after a clinician at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center in Baltimore found that some patients were giving it to their children as cold medicine. She contacted the Baltimore City Public Health Department which investigated and found the drug sold in three Latino convenience stores. Further investigation found the drug is also for sale in other stores in Maryland.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2014
Running a medical marijuana operation could cost each grower more than $125,000 a year in fees, a sum so steep some officials believe it may shut out small businesses. Maryland's medical marijuana commission is tentatively proposing that fee for each of the 15 potential growers envisioned for the state's new program. The panel also is recommending a $40,000-a-year charge for dispensaries, according to a draft plan expected to be released for public comment Wednesday. Those license fees - atop as much as $6,000 in application fees - would finance the state's nascent medical marijuana program.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | March 15, 2014
The Maryland House gave preliminary approval Saturday to a bill that would make it easier for caregivers to administer medication to patients in mental hospitals against their wishes. The action clears the way for a final House vote Monday on the measure, which is based in part on recommendations from a panel set up by Gov. Martin O'Malley after the 2012 shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Conn.  Similar legislation was passed unanimously in the Senate. Some advocates for people with mental illness argue that such measures are inhumane and violate patients' rights.
NEWS
July 6, 2011
The Sun's story on cardiovascular risks posed by smoking-cessation drug Chantix was an example of misleading statistics and careless journalism ("Chantix may cause more heart attacks than previously thought," July 5). The article presents what sounds like a startling finding: Chantix may increase a person's risk of serious cardiovascular problems by 72 percent. However, the research on which the article was based tells a different story. The actual risk of a serious cardiovascular event was 0.82 percent in patients who took a placebo versus 1.06 percent in patients who took Chantix.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Contributing Writer | June 30, 1992
Q: My doctor has prescribed medication that seems to relieve the pain when I have a migraine headache, but lately attacks have occurred with increased frequency and are more severe. Do you have any suggestions that might help?A: The management of migraine headaches involves two distinctly different goals. The first is to prevent attacks; the second is to treat headaches when prophylactic measures fail.The initial step in the prevention of attacks is to try to recognize and avoid factors that may trigger your attacks.
HEALTH
By Jordan Braverman and Jordan Braverman,Jordan Braverman is a health care consultant and author of "The Consumer's Book of Health: How to Stretch Your Health Care Dollar." | September 25, 1990
When your physician prescribes medication, you should ask questions about how to use the drug most effectively. It's important to do this, because your personal well-being is involved.Is the medicine necessary? Many patients think they must obtain a prescription every time they visit a physician. But medicine is not the answer to every health problem, and drugs should be taken only when needed.What is the name of the medication? What is its brand name? What is its generic name? Not all medications have a generic counterpart.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 13, 1997
The state's top court ducked yesterday the thorny issue of whether involuntarily committed mental patients may be forced to take drugs they do not want if they do not pose a danger inside the institution.The Court of Appeals dismissed the case of a former Crownsville Hospital Center patient as moot. It erased the intermediate appellate court's precedent-setting ruling that would have made harder for psychiatrists to force medication on patients who refuse it.But the issue could arise again, as nearly half of the 175 or so patients a year who are forcibly medicated appeal psychiatrists' medication orders.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1999
Two months after a federal judge dismissed a lawsuit against Howard County in the death of a 22-year-old inmate at the county Detention Center, the man's mother is suing again.Parrish Michael Spinoso died of an asthma attack in his cell on June 7, 1998. He had been arrested two days earlier during a raid on his Ellicott City apartment on drug charges.The lawsuit alleges that Spinoso didn't get his medication to fight his asthma problem. Spinoso's mother, Carol Lee Spinoso, sued Howard County in November.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
Gerald Wiseberg makes for an unlikely drug kingpin, but federal authorities say the 81-year-old Korean War veteran helped run an operation that doled out vast amounts of powerful prescription painkillers. Wiseberg and his business partners opened a clinic in Baltimore County in early 2011, soon after the Drug Enforcement Administration raided a similar operation he ran in Florida. Wiseberg's office here attracted droves of former customers from other states, according to a federal indictment that was unsealed Friday charging them with a drug conspiracy.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
A state panel on Tuesday hashed out more of the nitty-gritty details to create a medical marijuana industry from scratch, but some key points remained unresolved as the commission nears a deadline next week. Maryland's Medical Marijuana Commission plans to release Wednesday a second draft of regulations to create the program. Those 81-pages of rules have been reshaped after the first draft came under fire at a public hearing last month. Among the many changes in the new draft: removing a provision that would have effectively outlawed a grower or dispensary operation within Baltimore city limits.
NEWS
September 4, 2014
As members of the Natalie M. LaPrade Medical Marijuana Commission's policy subcommittee, we are honored to be able to serve our fellow citizens to develop a program that makes medical marijuana available to those Marylanders who have not found relief from conventional treatments and may benefit from its many medicinal uses in a safe, affordable manner ( "Proposed medical marijuana rules under fire," Aug. 27). As we have been writing the regulations to implement this new law, we are very mindful to balance the concerns of the General Assembly to assure ease of access for the patient and provide necessary security safeguards.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
Antibiotics have saved countless lives over the years, but their overuse has lead to problems including antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Dr. Mary R. Clance, an epidemiologist at Anne Arundel Medical Center, discusses the history, troubles and appropriate uses of the drugs. How have antibiotics contributed to public health since their discovery and what is their status now? The collective memory of death from infectious disease is short-lived. Death from pneumonia, puerperal fever, post-operative infection, urinary and skin infections were commonplace just two generations ago. Pneumonia was the leading cause of death at the beginning of the 20th century.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Former Catonsville doctor William Dando will not face trial for sexual assault allegations after agreeing never to practice medicine in Maryland again. Allegany County prosecutors dropped charges against him Tuesday, citing two factors — the "he said, she said" nature of the case and his decision to surrender his medical license. Dando had been scheduled to stand trial Wednesday in an incident in which a 41-year-old patient said he touched her genitals while treating her for an ear infection at an urgent-care center near Cumberland.
NEWS
September 1, 2014
The lack of coherent rules for access to medical marijuana in Maryland is beyond absurd ( "Pot as medicine," Aug. 27). Medical marijuana has already been successfully implemented in many states across the country. Is Maryland so different that we can't adopt the same policies in use by other states? While there have been abuses of the system, they are relatively rare and non-threatening. Extending the logic applied by the Maryland commission on medical marijuana, we should ban swimming pools - responsible for hundreds of injuries and deaths every year - reduce the highway speed limit to 25 mph and make countless other changes to state law. Obviously, that's not the answer.
NEWS
March 28, 2014
My dog is on a round of antibiotics for a urinary tract infection, and the medication seems to be upsetting her stomach — she doesn't want to eat much, which is very unusual. I know people can take probiotics for this, but are they safe for dogs? What can I do to help her feel better? Antibiotics can certainly cause stomach upset in some animals. The most common side effects are vomiting and/or diarrhea. If she is not eating, be sure to contact your veterinarian, as sometimes infections can worsen even while under treatment with antibiotics.
FEATURES
By Anthony Schmitz and Anthony Schmitz,In Health Magazine Universal Press Syndicate | September 17, 1991
WELL AFTER he had retired from his career as a high school teacher and principal, Oliver Stendgren still kept active, hunting, fishing and tending his garden. Tall and broad-shouldered, he'd been an imposing figure in his prime. And even when he reached his 80s, age seemed to have touched Stendgren's body only lightly.His mind, unfortunately, was another matter. By the time Stendgren was 84, his daughter Sheila (the names of Stendgren and his daughter have been changed to protect their privacy)
NEWS
September 1, 2014
I agree that Maryland's recently proposed rules regarding access to medical marijuana are overly restrictive ( "Pot as medicine," Aug. 27). Maryland policymakers are missing an opportunity to save lives. Baltimore, for example, has the highest rate of heroin addiction in the country. New research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association shows that states with legal access to medical marijuana have a 25 percent lower rate of opioid overdose deaths than states that prohibit marijuana.
NEWS
August 27, 2014
A state commission meeting this week to draft rules governing access to medical marijuana by patients and physicians has left advocates for the drug's therapeutic use wondering whether it will ever become available to those who need it. The commissioners need to balance the scientific and medical issues raised by medical marijuana against the legal constraints imposed by state and federal statutes. But in trying to walk a fine line between the two, the panel appears to have crafted rules that in some instances are so restrictive that many patients with illnesses that could be treated with the drug may never be able to get it. That would defeat the whole purpose of Maryland's medical marijuana law, which has already been delayed once since its passage in 2013.
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