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HEALTH
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2012
A 56-year-old Gambrills podiatrist was sentenced to more than four years in prison Wednesday for fraudulently billing Medicare $1.1 million over three years, according to the Maryland U.S. Attorney's Office. The scheme marked the second time Larry Bernhard had defrauded the federal agency, according to court records. In 2007, he signed a settlement agreement with the government admitting he'd billed for services he didn't provide between 2002 and 2004, and promising to abstain from using federal health care programs for three years.
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NEWS
July 8, 2014
In a recent letter, Joan Anderson expressed her concerns that Attorney General Douglas Gansler and his running mate would had been more understanding of senior issues than any other team running for governor ( "Who is the candidate for seniors?" July 5). She cited no specifics for her reasoning. The Maryland Attorney General's office has a department called the Health Education Advocacy Unit (HAU). The unit's primary charge is to address issues and circumstances encountered by the elderly.
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NEWS
By Mark Weisbrot | August 27, 1997
SOME OF THE recent Medicare-fraud stories are the kind of stuff that makes satire unnecessary. Like the owners of a home-health-care business who tried to include the BMW driven by their son in college as a cost of doing business.Other reports seem to have escaped from the script of a horror film: A cardiologist who got kickbacks from a pacemaker manufacturer is alleged to have implanted the devices in dozens of patients who didn't need them.Estimates of the overall scale of Medicare fraud run into the tens of billions of dollars.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2012
In Maryland, an orthopedic practice agreed to pay $2.5 million to the federal government to settle allegations that it had billed for patients' visits that never took place and had double-charged for X-ray work to get higher reimbursements. In Connecticut, a health care facility paid nearly a half-million dollars to the federal government in a similar settlement over allegations that it had exaggerated costs associated with a prostate cancer treatment. Those allegations, and another leveled recently at a Baltimore-area hospital, have highlighted an arcane record-keeping practice called "upcoding.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 21, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The federal government will begin enlisting millions of Medicare beneficiaries in its war against Medicare fraud this week, urging them to report billing errors, overcharges and other evidence of possible wrongdoing by their own doctors and hospitals.The campaign has strong support from lobbyists for the elderly, who see it as a way to educate consumers and save money for Medicare and its beneficiaries.But the effort has provoked outrage among doctors, who say it will drive a wedge into the doctor-patient relationship, undermining the trust needed for effective medical care.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2012
In Maryland, an orthopedic practice agreed to pay $2.5 million to the federal government to settle allegations that it had billed for patients' visits that never took place and had double-charged for X-ray work to get higher reimbursements. In Connecticut, a health care facility paid nearly a half-million dollars to the federal government in a similar settlement over allegations that it had exaggerated costs associated with a prostate cancer treatment. Those allegations, and another leveled recently at a Baltimore-area hospital, have highlighted an arcane record-keeping practice called "upcoding.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2003
The Johns Hopkins University announced yesterday that it will pay the government $800,000 to settle charges that it submitted fraudulent bills to Medicare. The case stems from a series of federal audits conducted in 1997 and 1998 of hospitals affiliated with medical schools. The investigations, known as Physicians at Teaching Hospitals (PATH) audits, looked at whether Medicare was billed for the correct level of service and whether faculty doctors were billing for work done by interns or residents.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | February 17, 1993
Fasten your seat belt, count your change, and always read your Medicare statement carefully.The best way to fight Medicare fraud and abuse, according to Susan G. Cronin, coordinator of the Senior Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program in Carroll County, is to check the Medicare Explanation of Benefits statement to make sure you've received all services the provider has billed for."Most providers are honest and responsible," she said, but even in Carroll County, Medicare fraud and abuse are a problem.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 28, 1999
FORT SMITH, Ark. -- Beverly Enterprises Inc., the largest U.S. nursing home chain, said yesterday that it will take a second-quarter pretax charge of $175 million to $225 million in anticipation of settling a U.S. Justice Department Medicare fraud investigation.The charge indicates that the company expects to pay the largest financial penalty ever against a nursing home company for health fraud.Beverly is the subject of a criminal grand jury probe -- part of a nationwide crackdown on Medicare fraud at nursing homes and hospitals -- into whether it inflated bills for nurses' pay. A settlement could ease investor uncertainty about the company, whose shares have declined nearly 60 percent since April 1998 as a result of the probe and slowing growth in Medicare payments.
NEWS
July 8, 2014
In a recent letter, Joan Anderson expressed her concerns that Attorney General Douglas Gansler and his running mate would had been more understanding of senior issues than any other team running for governor ( "Who is the candidate for seniors?" July 5). She cited no specifics for her reasoning. The Maryland Attorney General's office has a department called the Health Education Advocacy Unit (HAU). The unit's primary charge is to address issues and circumstances encountered by the elderly.
HEALTH
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2012
A 56-year-old Gambrills podiatrist was sentenced to more than four years in prison Wednesday for fraudulently billing Medicare $1.1 million over three years, according to the Maryland U.S. Attorney's Office. The scheme marked the second time Larry Bernhard had defrauded the federal agency, according to court records. In 2007, he signed a settlement agreement with the government admitting he'd billed for services he didn't provide between 2002 and 2004, and promising to abstain from using federal health care programs for three years.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2010
Sentient Medical Systems of Hunt Valley has agreed to pay the U.S. government $2.7 million to settle accusations that it submitted false Medicare claims. The company's former CEO, Jeffrey H. Owen, is also named as a party in the settlement, according to documents outlining the agreement. Owen sold the company in 2007. Sentient performs what is called remote neuro intraoperative monitoring, a process that remotely monitors a patient's nervous system during brain and spinal surgeries.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2010
A Towson attorney filed a foot-high stack of claims in a state arbitration office Tuesday on behalf of 101 patients alleging conspiracy, negligence and fraud against St. Joseph Medical Center and its former star cardiologist, Dr. Mark G. Midei, who's accused of performing hundreds of unnecessary cardiac procedures. The arbitration filings, required before court action, came after settlement talks between the hospital and medical malpractice attorney Jay D. Miller broke down. They represent the first significant wave of litigation involving Midei, who has already been sued in a handful of court filings this year.
HEALTH
By Peter Hermann and Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2010
A Towson attorney filed a foot-high stack of claims in a state arbitration office Tuesday on behalf of 101 patients alleging conspiracy, negligence and fraud against St. Joseph Medical Center and its former star cardiologist, Dr. Mark G. Midei, who's accused of performing hundreds of unnecessary cardiac procedures. The arbitration filings, required before court action, came after settlement talks between the hospital and medical malpractice attorney Jay D. Miller broke down. They represent the first significant wave of litigation involving Midei, who has already been sued in a handful of court filings this year.
NEWS
By Daniel W. Whitney | January 29, 2010
B illions of dollars are lost each year nationally to fraudulent Medicare and Medicaid claims. If only legitimate claims were paid, the savings could help pay for health care reform. The federal government has been unable to effectively police against such fraud - but private citizens can make a difference. A federal law known as the False Claims Act (FCA) has been on the books since the Civil War era. Originally designed to combat false claims submitted to the Union Army, the FCA applies to false or fraudulent medical claims submitted to the federal government for payment.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2003
The Johns Hopkins University announced yesterday that it will pay the government $800,000 to settle charges that it submitted fraudulent bills to Medicare. The case stems from a series of federal audits conducted in 1997 and 1998 of hospitals affiliated with medical schools. The investigations, known as Physicians at Teaching Hospitals (PATH) audits, looked at whether Medicare was billed for the correct level of service and whether faculty doctors were billing for work done by interns or residents.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1997
Saying that health care fraud is one of the nation's top two criminal problems, federal authorities announced a toll-free number yesterday that Marylanders can call to report waste and abuse affecting Medicare.The "Health Care Fraud Hotline," 800-377-5879, was established because of staggering levels of Medicare fraud each year, said Lynne A. Battaglia, U.S. attorney for Baltimore. Health and human services officials estimate $23 billion is lost annually from the Medicare program.Health care fraud is the No. 2 law enforcement priority for the U.S. Department of Justice, second only to violent crime, Battaglia said.
NEWS
January 30, 2000
More facts are needed for real debate on health care Your editorial "Harry and Louise return" (Jan. 23) says that "President Clinton unveiled his $110-billion plan to provide health care insurance for about 5 million uninsured Americans." That comes to a whopping $22,000 per person.What an expensive annual health insurance premium! We need more tangible facts, as you point out in your editorial. We also need sanity checks on the numbers discussed. In the same paper is an article titled "Clinton urges Congress to help fight Medicare fraud.
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