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Medicare And Medicaid

BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2001
CareFirst BlueCross Blue- Shield posted earnings yesterday of $24.3 million for the third quarter, which ended Sept. 30 - up 11 percent over the third quarter of last year. All of the improvement, however, came from dropping out of its money-losing Medicare and Medicaid HMOs, which together were responsible for more than $5 million in red ink in the third quarter of 2000. "If you pull out the public sector programs, on a sort of same-store basis, we're basically flat," said G. Mark Chaney, executive vice president and chief financial officer.
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NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | November 18, 1990
The director of a troubled Glen Burnie nursing home stepped down last week after state inspectors uncovered ongoing problems with supervision, record-keeping and patient care.Shirley D. McKnight, administrator of North Arundel Nursing and Convalescent Center for the last 11 years, retired Tuesday, four days after submitting another plan to correct violations of at least 12 state regulations.The private, 121-bed nursing home on Hospital Drive is on the brink of losing its Medicare and Medicaid support unless the latest correction plan shows significant improvements, state officials said.
NEWS
March 27, 1992
"Is it worth it?"Can you do anything?"Can you make the country better?"Sen. Warren B. Rudman asked himself these questions March 12 in a despairing speech about the "economic disaster" caused by runaway federal deficits. Twelve days later he provided his answer. It was no and no and no. This tough New Hampshire Republican announced he would retire, hale and hearty at 61, and it is difficult to think of a more somber commentary on politics in America.Mr. Rudman pondered in that March 12 soliloquy why it was that with the deficit running at a record $400 billion, the Bush administration and the Democratic leadership in Congress could contemplate budget proposals adding even a penny to a national debt rapidly nearing $4 trillion.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | March 5, 1992
An Annapolis nursing home that failed a recent state inspection is being threatened with sanctions until it corrects problems with providing patient care.Health inspectors reported deficiencies with staffing, supervision and patient treatment at the Annapolis Convalescent Center during visits in January and February. The 91-bed nursing home has until March 20 to submit a correction plan, or it risks losingits Medicare and Medicaid support.In a 62-page report released this week, the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene detailed violations of 13 state and federal regulations.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1998
Maryland's hospital rate-setting system is called an "all-payer" system because everyone who pays for hospital care -- HMOs, other insurers, Medicare and Medicaid -- pays the same rates.Those rates, different for each hospital, are set by the Health Services Cost Review Commission. The rates are based on units of service -- a day in a hospital room, an X-ray, and so on. They include an allowance for the cost of training residents and interns and for treating the uninsured, so these "social costs" are shared by all payers, including Medicare and Medicaid.
NEWS
By Nelson Schwartz and Nelson Schwartz,Contributing Writer | May 7, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Health care fraud and abuse could cost Americans $70 billion this year and may cost even more in the coming decade unless Congress takes steps to control it, according to a government study to be made public at a hearing on Capitol Hill today.A draft copy of the report, prepared by the General Accounting Office (GAO), also found examples of private companies and doctors who submitted phony documents and ordered unnecessary tests, collecting billions in fees from private insurance companies as well as public programs like Medicare and Medicaid.
NEWS
December 21, 1998
NURSING HOMES are a welcome community resource, but they can be the most troubling of institutions. Care of aged, infirm residents demands high moral and professional responsibility. With an aging society, the need for nursing homes and similar facilities is rising. More than 30,000 people are in Maryland homes. But repeated examples of deficient care for these defenseless members of society have pushed the government to step up nursing home inspections, toughen standards and impose heavier fines for violators.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 1, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Millions of older Americans will gain access to government-subsidized prescription drugs today with the long-awaited expansion of Medicare. But pharmacists say beneficiaries may initially experience delays and frustration as the promise of the new program is translated into practice. Tens of thousands of people who signed up for the benefit have yet to receive the plastic identification cards that will enable them to fill prescriptions promptly at retail drugstores. More than 5 million poor people have been assigned to Medicare drug plans selected at random by the federal government.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik | December 3, 1995
IN ONE DAY about a month ago, the stock of Integrated Health Systems Inc., an Owings Mills-based company that provides subacute post-hospitalization care, fell 15 percent. The stock plunged after IHS projected that its earnings would fall 10 percent to 25 percent a share because of federal efforts to rein in the costs of Medicare and Medicaid, which pay health costs for the elderly and the poor.As part of the budget process, both houses of Congress have approved plans to reduce the growth of spending on the two health programs.
NEWS
February 7, 1992
President Bush has proposed a $100 billion health-care package he says will give everyone access to medical insurance by controlling the growth of Medicaid and Medicare for poor and the elderly. Critics say the plan -- which would employ a system of credits, vouchers and tax breaks for poor and middle-class Americans -- would take from the poor to give mostly to the middle class.The Evening Sun would like to know what you think. Is this a fair plan? Will the proposal indeed make health care more available for the estimated 43 million Americans who can't afford it?
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