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NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Staff writer | February 10, 1991
In Hampton, S.C., the big, green trash-burning plant abruptly turnedinto the neighbor nobody wanted.An innocuous building with smokestacks poking through the roof became a potential killer, in the eyesof many, when it began burning syringes, bloody equipment, body parts and other medical waste along with its daily dose of trash.Residents' fears reached the highest levels of government. State lawmakers adopted a measure last year halving the incinerator's 100-ton daily consumption of medical waste, a move the plant's operators immediately challenged in court.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2011
Medical waste disposal company Daniels Sharpsmart Inc. said Friday it has opened a facility in East Baltimore. The facility, which became fully operational this month, will serve hospitals, clinics, medical and dental offices in Maryland, Washington, D.C., Delaware and Pennsylvania from the plant. The company said in a release that it was attracted to the area in part because of the quality of the region's hospitals. The company is known for its Sharpsmart system which allows for the safe disposal of needles and other sharp objects.
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NEWS
By Kate McKenna and Kate McKenna,States News Service | June 12, 1991
Medical waste polluting mailWASHINGTON -- Many years after medical waste washed ashore and closed beaches along the East Coast, a similar hazard is causing concern in a far more inland locale: U.S. postal mailrooms.Complaints are surfacing that postal workers have been injured handling medical-waste materials that are increasingly being transported via the U.S. mails.The problem has been especially acute on the East Coast, where mail handlers at three post offices have been complaining for years that hazardous materials, including containers holding potentially contaminated blood, urine and hypodermic needles, are being shipped through their facilities.
NEWS
By Barbara Sattler and Anna Gilmore Hall | March 25, 2005
JUST WHEN medical waste incinerators are going the way of dinosaurs, Baltimore is being stalked by the Tyrannosaurus rex of polluting technologies. The unusual saga of Baltimore's Phoenix Services incinerator - the largest medical waste incinerator in the country - is about to reach a new level of public scrutiny, and the stakes are high for the health of local families. City Councilman Edward L. Reisinger has introduced an ordinance to reduce the geographic area served by Phoenix from the current 250-mile radius - which includes New York City and other major metropolitan areas along the Eastern seaboard - to eight counties within Maryland.
NEWS
By Stacey Evers and Kate McKenna and Stacey Evers and Kate McKenna,States News Service | July 10, 1991
Bill aims at waste packagingPostal workers fearful of hazardous mail are looking to Rep. Frank Pallone, D-N.J., to save the day.Spurred to action by complaints and concerns from postal workers in New Jersey who have found themselves on the wrong end of hypodermic needles protruding from poorly wrapped packages, Pallone decided to introduce a bill this week to ensure safe mail.The proposed measure would require senders of medical waste to clearly identify contents on the outside of packages and would require that all such packages be sent by registered mail.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Staff Writer | November 3, 1992
Apparently bowing to criticism, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke has put the brakes on a proposal that would allow medical waste to be transported to a controversial Hawkins Point incinerator from all around the state until he gets specific tonnage and dollar figures about the operation.Mr. Schmoke planned to propose legislation two weeks ago that would have expanded the incinerator's "catchment area" to all of Maryland -- instead of just from hospitals in the city and three surrounding counties.News of that proposal surprised City Council members and residents and sparked a controversy that caused Mr. Schmoke to withdraw his request for the bill's introduction.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | October 4, 1991
The City of Baltimore has asked a federal judge to bar a new HawkinsPoint medical waste incinerator from accepting out-of-state waste.The city filed for an injunction Wednesday in Baltimore, said FrankDerr, a city attorney. Medical Waste Associates, the developer of the $26 million incinerator, has been operating the facility without anoccupancy permit since last winter, Derr said."I would think (the city) would issue them a permit if they couldconvince the zoning authority that they wouldn't accept waste from out of the region," Derr said.
NEWS
June 24, 1993
Trying to win approval for waste incinerators these days is virtually impossible. Despite assurances by experts that modern technology enables safe high-temperature incineration, politicians and voters are leery.This region is no exception. A year ago, the Baltimore City Council adopted a moratorium banning expansion or modification of incinerators.Despite that strict moratorium, the council recently showed remarkable flexibility in coping with the complexities of the waste-management issue.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Eric Siegel and Kim Clark and Eric Siegel,Sun Staff Writers | October 20, 1994
Medical Waste Associates Inc. has assembled a bankruptcy reorganization plan that calls for a new investor to make badly needed repairs to the rundown Hawkins Point incinerator and purchase the company for about $13.5 million by early next year.In the plan, filed in Baltimore's federal bankruptcy court, the Timonium-based Grotech Capital Group agreed to make up to $5 million worth of repairs, take responsibility for about $8 million worth of bonds and pay more than $2 million to settle claims against the incinerator.
NEWS
By Robert Lee and Robert Lee,Staff writer | November 18, 1990
The discovery of bloody medical waste at the Al-Ray rubble landfill in Lothian last week provided the county with a convenient excuse to slap a stop-work order on dumping, but it may be a second, technical charge that ultimately closes down the rubble fill.The county issued a temporary emergency stop-work order against Al-Ray Thursday after a zoning officer discovered bloody syringes, hospital gowns, casts and other assorted medical wastes mixed in with a truckload of rubble during a routine inspection Wednesday.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2005
A Baltimore developer known for breathing new life into crumbling architectural landmarks has purchased a run-down medical waste incinerator with a history of air pollution violations. Samuel K. Himmelrich Jr. says he has installed a $200,000 pollution filtration system at the Phoenix Services incinerator in Curtis Bay that he hopes will remove more than 90 percent of its mercury air pollution, which can cause brain damage in infants. And he said he plans to invest as much as $4 million over three years to fix up the decaying plant.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2004
A group of more than 50 residents of the Curtis Bay neighborhood in Baltimore called yesterday for the closure of a medical waste incinerator that has repeatedly violated legal limits for mercury air pollution. "Allowing Phoenix [Services Inc.] to continue to emit pollution is like letting me dump garbage on my neighbor's lawn -- except that in Phoenix's case, the pollution is toxic," Patrick Moylan, president of Concerned Citizens for a Better Brooklyn, told the audience at a news conference at the Curtis Bay Recreation Center on Filbert Street.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2004
A medical waste incinerator near Baltimore's industrial waterfront has violated limits for mercury, soot and other air pollutants more than 400 times over the past two years, prompting three state legislators and a city councilman to demand that the state shut it down. The Phoenix Services Inc. incinerator on Hawkins Point Road near Curtis Bay is responsible for about 5 percent of the mercury pollution from the state's smokestacks and contaminating fish in the Chesapeake Bay and other waterways, according to a study by the Maryland Public Interest Research Group, an environmental advocacy organization.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2000
David J. Taylor, the employee of a medical-waste disposal company who was crushed in a machine at the firm's Curtis Bay incinerator Saturday, was described as a quiet man by neighbors who were just getting to know him in his new neighborhood. Taylor, 41, was pronounced dead at his workplace, Phoenix Services Inc., shortly after the incident, which occurred about 11:40 a.m. Saturday. He lived alone in the 200 block of Old Riverside Road in Baltimore. Next-door neighbors Nancy and George Couch said Taylor was still unpacking before he left for work Saturday.
BUSINESS
December 15, 1998
The Antaeus Group, a Hunt Valley company marketing a medical waste disposal device, said yesterday that it struck its fourth multimillion-dollar distribution deal overseas.Under the agreement, PENCON, an engineering and construction firm based in Egypt, will purchase 15 of Antaeus' SSM-150s, which convert infectious medical waste into a mass of confetti-like, nonhazardous material. The agreement calls for PENCON to purchase the devices over a three-year period, beginning in 1999.The deal is worth an estimated $3 million to privately held Antaeus.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | May 5, 1998
A bill that would allow Baltimore police officers to tow and impound cars whose theft alarms continuously blare for no reason was unanimously approved last night by the City Council.The measure, which is expected to become law with the signature of Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, would also allow the city to fine the car owner $100.The bill was introduced by Councilman Robert Curran of the 3rd District, who was kept up one night by a neighbor's car alarm. After introducing the bill, Curran said he was shocked by the overwhelming support for the measure from irritated residents who have experienced the problem.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | January 11, 1991
A $26 million medical waste incinerator, the nation's largest, has begun to burn hospital refuse just across the northeastern Anne Arundel County border in Hawkins Point.Even as a lawsuit aimed at blocking the incinerator works its way through the Maryland courts, Consumat Inc. -- a Richmond, Va., contractor that is building the incinerator for a group of Maryland investors -- has begun testing the facility by burning medical wastes from Baltimore's Kernan Hospital.John Joiner, Consumat vice president, said the facility could begin accepting wastes from a second hospital in February.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2004
A medical waste incinerator near Baltimore's industrial waterfront has violated limits for mercury, soot and other air pollutants more than 400 times over the past two years, prompting three state legislators and a city councilman to demand that the state shut it down. The Phoenix Services Inc. incinerator on Hawkins Point Road near Curtis Bay is responsible for about 5 percent of the mercury pollution from the state's smokestacks and contaminating fish in the Chesapeake Bay and other waterways, according to a study by the Maryland Public Interest Research Group, an environmental advocacy organization.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | April 28, 1998
The old adage that cats have nine lives apparently includes cat legislation.A proposal to require licensing of cats keeps returning -- the latest version introduced in Baltimore's City Council last night, to require that owners purchase a $20 license for each of their cats.Previous cat licensing bills in the city have failed, but neighboring counties have passed similar legislation, causing furor among feline fanciers who say the licensing process and fee create a hassle for responsible pet owners.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | February 2, 1998
A small, diverse coalition gathered yesterday in Baltimore's rusty, industrial underbelly for a "Toxic Tour" of the plants and smokestacks that residents say are making the Brooklyn area unhealthy.The tour's main focus was a medical waste incinerator at Hawkins Point owned by Phoenix Services Inc., on the southern edge of Baltimore near the Anne Arundel County line. But the 40 or so participants were quick to point out that the incinerator is one of many industrial facilities in the area.
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