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March 5, 2013
I just finished reading the My Word segment in the Feb. 28 issue of the Columbia Flier. I don't think that I have ever seen the issue of abortion presented in such an elegant, thoughtful and straight forward manner. For many years, I have watched as medical technology has progressed in virtually every area including pre-natal and premature birth care. I wondered how pro-abortion advocates could possibly oppose the eventual reality of medical advances...
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | February 12, 2014
The Baltimore Sun Sister Mary Jacinta Robson, a retired medical technologist who spent six decades at Mercy Medical Center, died there of congestive heart failure Feb. 7. She was 88. "She had been a beloved presence at the hospital for over 60 years and worked in the microbiology department for decades, and in later years was a hospital volunteer," said Sister Irene Callahan, a fellow member of Sisters of Mercy. Born Clara Jane Robson in Baltimore and raised on Ridgewood Avenue, she was the daughter of Alonzo Robson, a clerk, and Goldie Updegraff Robson, a homemaker.
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BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | August 13, 1991
Revolution takes many forms. Chanting demonstrators were marching in protest in Berkeley, Calif., against volleyball courts about to be built by the University of California in People's Park, a haven for the free speech movement in the 1960s and for the homeless today. These protesters, sporting the long hair and tie-dyed garb of the '60s, are still fighting to change the system.Just a few blocks away, some revolutionary changes in medical technology and investment strategy are being tracked by the considerably more sedate Piedmont Venture Group.
EXPLORE
March 5, 2013
I just finished reading the My Word segment in the Feb. 28 issue of the Columbia Flier. I don't think that I have ever seen the issue of abortion presented in such an elegant, thoughtful and straight forward manner. For many years, I have watched as medical technology has progressed in virtually every area including pre-natal and premature birth care. I wondered how pro-abortion advocates could possibly oppose the eventual reality of medical advances...
NEWS
By Holly Selby | March 20, 1991
According to the experts, Kirby Montgomery is sitting pretty.He's 31 years old, has a degree in biology from New York State University in Albany, two years of graduate-level courses in biomedical sciences and several years of experience in medical technology.As such, say local career counselors, he and others working in health-related services, from occupational therapists to medical technologists, are in high demand on the job market today, with or without a recession.For example, medical assistants, home health aides, radiological technologists and technicians are listed by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics as the second, third and fourth fastest growing fields in the nation through the year 2000.
NEWS
July 24, 2000
Frances E. Rohrbaugh, 80, laboratory administrator Frances E. Rohrbaugh, a longtime medical technologist and laboratory administrator, died Tuesday of heart and kidney failure at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson. She was 80. Born in Galena, Kan., Ms. Rohrbaugh graduated as valedictorian of Galena High School in 1937 and then attended Kansas State Teachers College, intending to go to medical school. Although she was accepted at several medical schools, Ms. Rohrbaugh suspended her dream of becoming a doctor for financial reasons.
NEWS
January 14, 1991
It is the exceptional cases that put rules and guidelines to the test. Facing that rare exception -- a husband who is adamant that his wife be kept alive against all medical and ethical advice -- a hospital in Minnesota has made news by going to court to ask permission to discontinue futile treatment of 87-year-old Helga Wanglie. The hospital's case is a strong one: Physicians and nurses there do not believe they should be forced to render medical care they consider inappropriate and that cannot be considered to be in the patient's best interests.
NEWS
November 18, 1991
Before next summer, the Parkway/Swirnow Group Ltd. has the daunting task of convincing the Maryland Stadium Authority and medical suppliers that Baltimore is the right place for a $600 million medical trade mart and convention center. This is no small undertaking. The kind of medical technology exhibition and conference set-up Parkway envisions is widely used in other industries, but as yet untested in the medical equipment and supply business. The stadium authority wants assurances that the facility won't clog traffic or interfere with the baseball stadium or the proposed expansion of the Baltimore Convention Center.
BUSINESS
By Opinions on stocks offered by investment experts. Compiled by Steve Halpern for Knight Ridder | September 4, 1991
Medical Technology"Medical Technology (MSYS, OTC, around $0.75) makes and sells disposable medication punch cards; these cards supply patients with 30 days' worth of medication," explains the Oberweis Report, by Hamilton Investments of Aurora, Ill."The firm also makes the equipment that fills these cards. The stock is recommended for high-risk investors."We emphasize that this speculative issue is only suitable for those willing to accept an extreme amount of risk."Fla. Progress"America's sunshine state has a lot more to glow about than good weather; it is also the home of Florida Progress, a $5 billion holding company (FPC, NYSE, around $41)
NEWS
January 26, 1993
ANOTHER inauguration took place this past week: the official opening of the new Baltimore VA Medical Center on Greene Street downtown -- a Taj Mahal of medical technology.For $121 million, area veterans have gotten the latest in state-of-the-art medical care spread over one million square feet of space. It looks and feels like a Hyatt Regency hotel, with its two atriums, glass skylights and over 300 rooms with a view.Already, this building has been named the 1992 Grand Award Winner by the Landscaping Contractors of America for Environmental Improvement.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2010
Robert G. Lancaster, a retired Mercy Medical Center chief pathologist and teacher, died of cancer Saturday at College Manor in Lutherville. A resident of the Hampton section of Towson, he was 79. Born and raised in Spokane, Wash., he was a graduate of Gonzaga University and moved to Baltimore to attend the University of Maryland School of Medicine. He served in the Navy from 1958 to 1960. In 1961, he became Mercy's laboratory director and worked in its old College of Physicians and Surgeons Building on Calvert Street.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | April 17, 2008
Robert A. Spar, a tax attorney and partner in his law firm who assisted new and emerging technology businesses, often in the medical field, died in his sleep of a gastrointestinal tumor Tuesday at his Elkridge home. He was 44. Born in Queens, N.Y., he received a Bachelor of Science degree at the University at Buffalo and earned a degree from the Catholic University of America's Columbus School of Law. He moved to Baltimore in 1988 when he joined Weinberg & Green and remained with the law firm when it merged 10 years later and became Saul Ewing.
NEWS
By Susan Thornton Hobby and Susan Thornton Hobby,Special to the Sun | February 16, 2007
Marlene Freed knows what's coming. For 10 relaxing minutes, she has been lying on her back, with ice chilling the swollen tissue around a seven-inch scar on her right leg -- the spot where doctors inserted her new titanium knee. The 68-year-old Olney resident is laughing and chatting. But when physical therapist Chris Gnip climbs onto the table and starts to bend her knee, pushing it carefully but relentlessly toward her chest, Freed clams up. She closes her eyes and starts to breathe deeply.
BUSINESS
By M. WILLIAM SALGANIK and M. WILLIAM SALGANIK,SUN REPORTER | May 10, 2006
The United States lags "at least a dozen years" behind other industrialized countries in adopting electronic medical records, according to a study published yesterday in the journal Health Affairs. Gerard F. Anderson, a professor at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; Bianca K. Frogner, a graduate student there; Roger A. Johns, a professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine; and Uwe Reinhardt, a professor of economics at Princeton University, are the authors of the article.
BUSINESS
By M. WILLIAM SALGANIK and M. WILLIAM SALGANIK,SUN REPORTER | April 6, 2006
Riding an improving market for new stocks and investor interest in medical technology advances, Visicu Inc. began life as a public company yesterday with the year's second-most-successful debut, rising 54.9 percent from its opening price. Shares in the initial public offering were priced at $16, leaped to more than $25 in the first 10 minutes of trading, then leveled off to close at $24.78. The offering raised $100 million for the Baltimore company, which develops remote monitoring systems for intensive care units.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2003
INTEREST IN dyslexia, the reading disorder, seems to ebb and flow inexplicably. Right now it's flowing. Time magazine's cover this week features a wide-eyed kid holding a miniature chalkboard on which are printed a "b" and a "d," letters that all dyslexics are believed (erroneously) to confuse and write backward. "Overcoming Dyslexia," shouts the Time headline. "What new brain science reveals -- and what parents can do." Time devotes eight pages to the "new science" of dyslexia. It's not really that new -- The Sun featured the research in its first Reading By 9 series in 1997 -- but it represents an exciting breakthrough.
NEWS
March 18, 2003
Deborah Ann Patro, a retired medical technician, died of complications from diabetes Friday at her Abingdon home. She was 51. Born and raised in Baltimore, Miss Patro was a 1969 graduate of Mercy High School. She earned her bachelor's degree in medical technology in 1973 from what is now Towson University. She began her career during the 1970s in the laboratory at Union Memorial Hospital and later worked at Good Samaritan Hospital. From 1992 to 2000, she was employed by Johnson & Johnson.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2010
Robert G. Lancaster, a retired Mercy Medical Center chief pathologist and teacher, died of cancer Saturday at College Manor in Lutherville. A resident of the Hampton section of Towson, he was 79. Born and raised in Spokane, Wash., he was a graduate of Gonzaga University and moved to Baltimore to attend the University of Maryland School of Medicine. He served in the Navy from 1958 to 1960. In 1961, he became Mercy's laboratory director and worked in its old College of Physicians and Surgeons Building on Calvert Street.
NEWS
March 18, 2003
Deborah Ann Patro, a retired medical technician, died of complications from diabetes Friday at her Abingdon home. She was 51. Born and raised in Baltimore, Miss Patro was a 1969 graduate of Mercy High School. She earned her bachelor's degree in medical technology in 1973 from what is now Towson University. She began her career during the 1970s in the laboratory at Union Memorial Hospital and later worked at Good Samaritan Hospital. From 1992 to 2000, she was employed by Johnson & Johnson.
NEWS
July 24, 2000
Frances E. Rohrbaugh, 80, laboratory administrator Frances E. Rohrbaugh, a longtime medical technologist and laboratory administrator, died Tuesday of heart and kidney failure at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson. She was 80. Born in Galena, Kan., Ms. Rohrbaugh graduated as valedictorian of Galena High School in 1937 and then attended Kansas State Teachers College, intending to go to medical school. Although she was accepted at several medical schools, Ms. Rohrbaugh suspended her dream of becoming a doctor for financial reasons.
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