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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
Keith King was kicked out at age 18 from the religious commune in Pennsylvania where he grew up. He had $150 and no place to go after he defied the elders, telling them he wanted to leave and pursue his dream of becoming a doctor. Nearly a decade later, King beamed and kissed his pregnant wife Friday after he opened a letter saying he would soon begin practicing as a general surgery resident at Rutgers' Robert Wood Johnson Medical School in New Jersey after completing four years at the University of Maryland School of Medicine.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 19, 2014
Levi Watkins, the pioneering cardiac surgeon at Johns Hopkins Hospital, remembers the date — January 15 — because it was the anniversary of the birth of Martin Luther King Jr., and because what happened that night still makes him ache. It was 1979, and Watkins, the first black chief resident in cardiac surgery at Hopkins, had just left his office after conferring with a senior medical student named Alan Trimakas. They had agreed on the subject of a research project — cardiac neoplasms, tumors of the heart or heart valves.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2012
Twins William and Raphael "Rafi" Karkowsky have always shared life's best moments. That was true again Friday when the brothers and best friends learned where they would begin their careers as doctors. They were among nearly 16,000 medical students nationwide who opened Match Day letters and learned where they would conduct postgraduate study. More than 95 percent of students were matched with residency positions, the highest rate in 30 years, according to the National Resident Match Program.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 5, 2014
The tree still lives at the corner of Wolfe and Monument streets, in the midst of the sprawling Johns Hopkins Hospital complex of East Baltimore. The tree lives in memory of Alan Trimakas, a medical student who never got to be the doctor he wanted to be and that the world surely needed. Classmates of Trimakas planted the tree a few months after his senseless, infuriating death. A senior in the Hopkins medical school, Trimakas specialized in internal medicine and cardiology; he wanted to be a cardiologist.
HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington and Joe Burris and Baltimore Sun reporters | March 18, 2010
Nikki Alworth stared at the envelope, then stared again, her eyes scanning the words over and over. She wasn't imagining things. The University of Maryland medical student would remain at the university to begin her career as a doctor in emergency medicine. No need to sell the house in Rodgers Forge. No need for her husband to find a new job and to hunt for new day care for their 18-month old daughter Finley. And no need to fret any longer -- she got her first choice. In an annual ritual steeped in tradition, suspense and plenty of drama, Alworth was among the 15,000 medical students at 130 medical schools across the nation who simultaneously ripped opened "Match Day" letters Thursday, notifying them where they'll spend their post-graduate medical training.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2012
The stethoscope may be an icon of the medical profession to most patients. But it's more of a relic to many doctors. The device used to listen to the heart, lungs and other body parts — invented nearly 200 years ago — has been overtaken by newer, more sophisticated imaging equipment and other changes in healthcare. And some adherents to the old ways say a significant number of physicians who wear a stethoscope around their necks no longer know how to use it properly. Some medical schools including Johns Hopkins, however, are bringing back the lost art of cardiac auscultation, or listening, as a means to sharpen their students' diagnostic skills and cut costs from excessive high-tech imaging.
NEWS
July 16, 2013
The changes coming with the 2015 MCAT exam represent an important shift in the way we assess and prepare tomorrow's doctors ("A better MCAT may not produce better doctors," July 10). We recognize that these changes may bring challenges for aspiring doctors, especially those who have taken non-traditional paths to medical school. Yet this evolution of the MCAT exam will help medical schools better identify not only the students who are the most academically prepared to become physicians, but also those who have the potential to become the best doctors in a changing health care system.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2013
Vernissia Tam gulped down half a glass of champagne at noon Friday and prepared to scream. She was about to find out what kind of doctor she would become, and where she would train. "No peeking," a Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine official told the Class of 2013. "The diplomas aren't printed yet. " After a countdown from 10 that took all of three seconds, Tam and her classmates broke the seals on letters revealing their fates, jumping into one another's arms for an embrace and congratulations.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | October 8, 1991
There in front of you on this TV screen a hand is holding a human heart, pumping it, keeping its owner alive. The patient had been in the midst of a bypass operation when his cholesterol-clogged heart stopped beating.Narrating all this is a third-year medical student who has been in the operating room observing. You've been following this student's progress through med school for more than an hour of this special two-hour season-opener of PBS' science series "Nova." "So You Want to be a Doctor?"
NEWS
By Edward L. Heard Jr. and Edward L. Heard Jr.,Staff Writer | June 17, 1992
The fact that deoxyribonucleic acid replicates only once per cell cycle titillates the thinking process for Ramona F. Swaby."Isn't it exciting?" says the 24-year-old Seton Hill resident, a second-year student at the University of Maryland Medical School."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
Ann Elizabeth Stromberg, a retired orthoptist who worked with children with eye conditions and trained medical students during her six-decade career, died of Alzheimer's disease June 4 at Somerford Home in Columbia. The Ellicott City resident was 91. Born in Baltimore and raised in Catonsville on Delrey Avenue, she was the daughter of Henry Stromberg, a News American advertising salesman, and Edna Amanda Ray, a homemaker. She was a 1941 graduate of Mount de Sales Academy and earned a diploma at Mount St. Agnes College in Mount Washington.
NEWS
March 23, 2014
Thank you for your editorial describing Dr. Vivek Murthy's qualifications to serve as our nation's next surgeon general. Moreover, thank you for chastising the National Rifle Association's irrational, unfounded attacks on Dr. Murthy ( "Another NRA victim," March 20). Let me offer a few facts and my firsthand observations of Dr. Murthy's skills and abilities. As your editorial notes, he truly is accomplished in several key aspects of delivering health care directly to patients, teaching medical students, conducting research and setting up innovative private sector information systems for doctors.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
Keith King was kicked out at age 18 from the religious commune in Pennsylvania where he grew up. He had $150 and no place to go after he defied the elders, telling them he wanted to leave and pursue his dream of becoming a doctor. Nearly a decade later, King beamed and kissed his pregnant wife Friday after he opened a letter saying he would soon begin practicing as a general surgery resident at Rutgers' Robert Wood Johnson Medical School in New Jersey after completing four years at the University of Maryland School of Medicine.
NEWS
July 16, 2013
The changes coming with the 2015 MCAT exam represent an important shift in the way we assess and prepare tomorrow's doctors ("A better MCAT may not produce better doctors," July 10). We recognize that these changes may bring challenges for aspiring doctors, especially those who have taken non-traditional paths to medical school. Yet this evolution of the MCAT exam will help medical schools better identify not only the students who are the most academically prepared to become physicians, but also those who have the potential to become the best doctors in a changing health care system.
NEWS
By Diane Kuhn | July 10, 2013
What does it take to become a good doctor? In the midst of a period of health care reform and primary care shortages, how we do to encourage talented students who want to give back to the community to go into medicine? Since the 1920s, the Medical College Admissions Test, or MCAT, has played a central role in the admissions process for prospective medical students, helping admissions officers make tough calls about which students are best qualified to train as physicians. Initially developed as a way to reduce drop out and flunk out rates, the test now helps differentiate between applicants with near-perfect grades, college leadership positions and shadowing experience.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2013
The University of Maryland School of Medicine announced this week a $500 million fundraising goal — the Baltimore institution's largest campaign ever. Donors already have given $339 million during the quiet phase of the campaign, dubbed "Transforming Medicine Beyond Imagination. " The money will be used to advance research, fund top-notch training of doctors and devise ways to improve patient care, said Dean E. Albert Reece. Reece said institutions like his need to look more to private donors as government funds fail to keep pace with growth.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,jill.rosen@baltsun.com | September 29, 2009
Ryan Circh's heart is drawn to family medicine, but his head - fixated on his daunting student loans and the uncertainties of health care reform - is leading him toward emergency or sports medicine. The 24-year-old studying medicine at the University of Maryland is probably another potential primary care physician lost. In the school's most recent graduating medical school class, more than a third pursued internal and family medicine. That reflects a nationwide trend, according to the National Resident Matching Program, whose figures show about a third of graduating students are going into primary care, a number that's been dropping fairly steadily over the last generation.
NEWS
By Aparna Surendran and Aparna Surendran,PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER | August 11, 2002
Martin Williams, the 17-year-old captain of his high school basketball team, is sitting in the doctor's office complaining of a constant headache. In reality, the "patient" is Matt Saunders, 25, an actor and set designer. The doctor, though, is real: Shahram Sani works at Abington Memorial Hospital near Philadelphia. This little exercise is designed to test his bedside manner. Technically, the "clinical skills assessment" measures the ability to gather information, perform physical examinations and effectively communicate with patients.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2013
Vernissia Tam gulped down half a glass of champagne at noon Friday and prepared to scream. She was about to find out what kind of doctor she would become, and where she would train. "No peeking," a Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine official told the Class of 2013. "The diplomas aren't printed yet. " After a countdown from 10 that took all of three seconds, Tam and her classmates broke the seals on letters revealing their fates, jumping into one another's arms for an embrace and congratulations.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2013
Dr. Ellen G. McDaniel, whose distinguished career in psychiatry spanned more than 40 years and influenced patients, medical students and even juries, died of lung cancer Thursday at her home in Highland. She was 71. The former Ellen Garb was raised in Cleveland and went off to college with thoughts of becoming a nurse. But her father encouraged her to train as a doctor, and she did — graduating from the University of Michigan Medical School as one of only seven women in the class of 1966, said her husband, John P. McDaniel.
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