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NEWS
July 9, 2012
Unless Congress acts, America may lose its leadership in biomedical science. Federally-funded biomedical research has greatly improved our quality of life. Diseases that were once a death sentence are now treatable. Federal research funding also bolsters Maryland's economy. The National Institutes of Health sent Maryland over a billion dollars ($1,687,675,636) in 2011 for research and training. These NIH grants create jobs and stimulate economic growth in our communities. However, under last year's Budget Control Act, automatic budget cuts will take effect in January unless Congress acts now. This would cut NIH's research budget by up to 11 percent.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
Part of Friday's annual Red-White spring game at Maryland will involve fundraising for Uplifting Athletes, a non-profit organization that matches college football teams that raise money for medical research of rare diseases. The Terps are helping raise money for cystic fibrosis. Former Maryland star and current NFL analyst Boomer Esiason has a foundation to help research a disease that afflicts his 22-year-old son Gunnar.  “We're trying to get the players more involved.
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NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | November 25, 1998
HOW SHOULD Maryland spend roughly $150 million a year in blood money from the tobacco industry? That could become a bitterly divisive issue between now and early April, when the legislature gives final approval to the governor's budget.Every interest group will be lobbying for a slice of this Christmas gift from cigarette makers. Every legislator and the governor will have ideas on how to dispose of the money.Republicans already are talking about -- what else? -- tax cuts. Gov. Parris N. Glendening is talking about using the money to reduce class sizes, renovate schools and give free health care to children.
NEWS
By Kathy O. Volk | December 12, 2013
As someone who was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2008, I have taken advantage of the incredible research studies at Johns Hopkins Hospital, the University of Maryland Medical Center and the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and I'm thankful they're a short drive from my home. I'm concerned about their ability to continue clinical trials amid budget cuts, however. The battles in Washington, as in a real battle, create casualties - among them people with diseases and disabilities hoping for medical breakthroughs.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2001
The Johns Hopkins University, Kennedy Krieger Institute and University of Maryland filed court briefs yesterday asking the state's highest court to reconsider an Aug. 16 ruling that imposed restrictions on medical research involving children. The universities warned that the Maryland Court of Appeals ban on enrolling minors in nontherapeutic studies that involve risk to the subjects would "cripple the pursuit of critical medical and public health research," according to a statement released by the parties.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2002
For years, medical research in Baltimore was synonymous with the Johns Hopkins University. However, as new figures released by the University of Maryland, Baltimore show, Baltimore is fast becoming a two-team town in the big leagues of medical research. Last fiscal year, the professional schools of UMB, led by the University of Maryland School of Medicine, brought in about $305 million in research funding - about 20 percent more than UMB received the year before, and nearly triple the $103 million it attracted eight years ago. The increase means that UMB is rapidly closing the gap with Hopkins, which received $368 million in federal and private research funding for its medical school, and an additional $180 million for its public health school, in the 2001 fiscal year, the last period for which Hopkins has totals.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2013
In a research lab in East Baltimore, rats that provide clues to how the brain degenerates with age could grow too old or even die before scientists can complete their experiments. At a homeless shelter, a Baltimore mother feeds her underweight toddler cereal, peanut butter and milk — and worries about nutrition aid running out before the child reaches a healthier size. In his Reisterstown home, a veteran hobbled by injuries stemming from his Army service decades ago waits for a check to help offset medical bills.
NEWS
By Kathy O. Volk | December 12, 2013
As someone who was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2008, I have taken advantage of the incredible research studies at Johns Hopkins Hospital, the University of Maryland Medical Center and the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and I'm thankful they're a short drive from my home. I'm concerned about their ability to continue clinical trials amid budget cuts, however. The battles in Washington, as in a real battle, create casualties - among them people with diseases and disabilities hoping for medical breakthroughs.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | April 21, 1992
Former Sen. Paul T. Tsongas, whose successful fight against lymph cancer became a symbol of strength in his failed bid for the Democratic presidential nomination, will help launch a campaign today aimed at raising public awareness about the benefits of medical research.Mr. Tsongas will be the keynote speaker at the Maryland Science Center, where a national not-for-profit organization called Research!America will begin a two-week campaign of educational programs in Maryland schools, libraries and health care institutions.
NEWS
May 3, 2012
The mushroom in the recent Reader SunShots photograph ("Details winner," April 29) is a Turkey Tail (Trametes versicolor) shelf mushroom. It is non-toxic, but inedible as is; it has the texture of shoe leather. Some people grind it into a powder and make tea out of it as a homeopathic medicinal remedy for all kinds of ailments. It is also used significantly in medical research for cancer and even has some published scientific success in helping breast cancer . Steve Johnson, Monkton
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
Howard middle linebacker Mac Lee is a thinking man's football player. A student of the game, the senior who wants to become a doctor enjoys the mental challenge of the game as much as the physical one. He likes to dissect every play and estimates he spends four hours a week outside of Lions' film sessions studying on his own. This fall, he has 22 solo tackles, 20 assisted tackles and three sacks for the Lions (4-2), who slipped into a third-place tie in the Howard County league after Friday's 13-6 upset loss to Reservoir.
NEWS
October 6, 2013
My wife and I were deeply saddened to learn of the death of our friend, Tom Clancy. The Tom Clancy we were privileged to know was kind and thoughtful to others, a devoted father, passionate and deeply loyal to his Orioles and native Baltimore. He gave generously to medical research at Johns Hopkins, was a genuine American patriot and friend to all those who serve in our armed forces and their families, was an expert student of military history and especially tactical and strategic command decisions, and had a unique and gifted imagination and ability to tell a story all the world could enjoy.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2013
In a research lab in East Baltimore, rats that provide clues to how the brain degenerates with age could grow too old or even die before scientists can complete their experiments. At a homeless shelter, a Baltimore mother feeds her underweight toddler cereal, peanut butter and milk — and worries about nutrition aid running out before the child reaches a healthier size. In his Reisterstown home, a veteran hobbled by injuries stemming from his Army service decades ago waits for a check to help offset medical bills.
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2013
The head of the nation's medical research agency and leaders of Johns Hopkins hospital and medical school warned Monday that progress in fighting diseases could be slowed, jobs lost and scientists driven overseas unless across-the-board federal funding cuts are reversed. Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health, joined Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, Hopkins executives and a stroke survivor at Hopkins' Children's Center to appeal for restoration of $1.5 billion in NIH funding cuts as part of the budget "sequester" approved last winter by Congress.
SPORTS
By Nick Bedford, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2013
Anthony "A.J. " Williams works in science by day and in the sweet science by night. He's accustomed to the good-natured verbal jabs he takes about his pursuit of a boxing career. "They actually just make jokes about it all day every day," the 26-year-old fighter said of his colleagues at Parexel International, a bio/pharmaceutical services organization, where he works as a research technician in Baltimore. "When I was an amateur, I had to be clean-shaved. So I came into work with a pencil mustache looking like I was someone's father.
NEWS
By Michael Milken and Elias Zerhouni | March 21, 2013
Albert Einstein was 26 when he published his Special Theory of Relativity; James Watson, at age 25, explained the structure of DNA. Here in Baltimore, many great medical achievements were developed by early-career researchers at Johns Hopkins. "The young do not know enough to be prudent," said Pearl Buck. "They attempt the impossible, and achieve it, generation after generation. " Today's young American scientists are no less inspired but are discouraged by a perceived lack of opportunity after long, grueling years of training.
NEWS
November 6, 2012
As one who has been following the pros and cons of the gay marriage debate, one fact has gone unmentioned. There is no way to convince a person to be or not be homosexual; it is not a choice but the way one is born. For religious people, this means that gays and lesbians have been created by God to be who and what they are. Medical research has shown that gay people's brains are actually "wired" differently than those of heterosexuals. Why would anyone "chose" to be homosexual knowing that it would mean being shunned by a large segment of the population out of ignorance or hate?
NEWS
By Daniel S. Greenberg | May 24, 1999
IT'S easy to get the impression from a cluster of recent episodes that shoddy ethical practices are plentiful and growing in medical research. But no one knows for sure because the science establishment runs like a bank without auditors.As a result, it's only the gross, unconcealable delinquencies that come to public attention. There has been a bunch of them lately.On May 10, the federal ethics cops shut down some 2,000 medical research projects at Duke University for four days because of noncompliance with regulations for experiments on humans.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2013
Dr. William Dewey Blake, a retired University of Maryland School of Medicine professor who was chairman of the department of physiology, died of cancer Sunday at his Bath, Maine, home. The former Bolton Hill resident was 94. Born in Summit, N.J., and raised in New Haven, Conn., he was the son of Dr. Francis Blake, Yale University's department of medicine chairman who was also an internist. His mother, Dorothy Blake, was a homemaker. After graduating from the Hopkins Grammar School in New Haven, he earned a degree at Dartmouth College, where he was a member of Phi Beta Kappa.
NEWS
November 6, 2012
As one who has been following the pros and cons of the gay marriage debate, one fact has gone unmentioned. There is no way to convince a person to be or not be homosexual; it is not a choice but the way one is born. For religious people, this means that gays and lesbians have been created by God to be who and what they are. Medical research has shown that gay people's brains are actually "wired" differently than those of heterosexuals. Why would anyone "chose" to be homosexual knowing that it would mean being shunned by a large segment of the population out of ignorance or hate?
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