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By MELISSA HARRIS | March 17, 2006
As the Department of Veterans Affairs evacuated hundreds of patients from its New Orleans hospital three days before the levees failed, another crucial part of the federal government's relief effort was air-lifted to Houston: two backup computer tapes holding more than 180,000 electronic health records. The tapes included veterans' allergies, medicines and basic information -- enough data that any evacuated veteran could be treated at any veterans hospital. Without electronic records, hospital staff would have spent critical minutes, even hours, lugging thousands of paper files to higher ground.
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NEWS
By Jenny Black | April 14, 2014
An absolute right to privacy in health care is enshrined in the oath all medical professionals must take. Providers understand they cannot effectively treat a patient if that patient cannot trust that his or her medical information will remain confidential. Certain types of insurance communications can inadvertently compromise medical privacy, such as the Explanation of Benefits (EOB) sent to policy-holders whenever an insurance policy is used by a family member. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)
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NEWS
September 11, 2003
Carnetta McGriff, a medical records supervisor, died of pneumonia Friday at Northwest Hospital Center. The Northwest Baltimore resident was 51. Born Carnetta Wynn Spencer in Baltimore and raised on Carleview Road, she was a 1970 graduate of Forest Park High School. She earned an associate's degree from what is now Baltimore City Community College. She managed medical records at the old Provident and Lutheran hospitals, and for the past four years was a medical records director at the Park West Medical Center in Reisterstown Road Plaza.
NEWS
March 3, 2014
Back in 1970 when Maryland was just entering what might be described as its golden age of political corruption, the General Assembly passed a law to make it easier for people to obtain government records. The Public Information Act was seen as a way to help hold all state agencies - executive, legislative and judicial - more accountable to the citizens. The PIA has been a huge success. Every day it is used by someone somewhere to peruse the fine print of a disputed contract, find out how taxpayer dollars are spent, discover what senior officials are saying to each other (or to those in private industry they are supposed to be regulating)
NEWS
By Daniel S. Greenberg | August 6, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Frolicking teen-agers occasionally bust into the computer systems of the Pentagon, banks and other supposed bastions of electronic security. If they can do it, what's to prevent intrusions into computerized medical records by nosy employers, anxious lovers, professional rivals, crafty salesmen and curious kooks?Actually, very little. Over the past decade, that's been the consistent conclusion of a variety of studies by specialists in medicine, law and computers.They were mainly looking ahead to the inevitable day when computer wizardry would be extensively employed for the improvement of patient care.
NEWS
August 27, 2004
Elizabeth E. Miller, a retired medical records administrator at Kernan Hospital, died of heart failure Monday at St. Joseph Medical Center. The longtime Towson resident was 75. She was born Elizabeth Eastman in Baltimore, the daughter of Dr. Nicholas Eastman, a noted Johns Hopkins Hospital obstetrician and author of Expectant Motherhood. She spent her early years in Beijing, where her father had a medical post. The family returned to Homeland, and she graduated in 1946 from Roland Park Country School.
NEWS
December 14, 2006
Lamona K. Burdusi, a medical records worker and longtime member of St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, died of complications from a broken hip Dec. 7 at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Bel Air resident was 73. She was born and raised Lamona Kootsouradis in Monessen, Pa., the daughter of Greek immigrants. In 1955, after her parents died, she moved to Baltimore. In 1959, she married John M. Burdusi, who worked in the sausage-making department at Esskay meatpacking, and settled in Baltimore's Greektown neighborhood.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | June 16, 2006
Patients of the land, unite! You have nothing to lose but your privacy. There's a growing national effort to bring medical records into the 21st century by converting the paper records scattered in doctors' file cabinets to electronic records by 2014. It's a grand idea - in many ways. If medical records were electronic, prescriptions would be more legible and pharmacists could fill them more accurately. Scientists would have access to a gold mine of data about diseases. Public health officials could spot disease outbreaks quickly and track their spread.
NEWS
By Peter Franceschina and Peter Franceschina,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | April 8, 2004
Rush Limbaugh's five-month fight to keep his medical records from Palm Beach County prosecutors went before an appeals court yesterday, in what likely will result in a pivotal decision on whether the criminal investigation into his prescription drug use can go forward. Miami attorney Roy Black portrayed the prosecution's seizure of Limbaugh's medical records late last year as an invasion of privacy that could have adverse effects on the doctor-patient relationship for all Florida residents.
NEWS
By Peter Franceschina and Peter Franceschina,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | December 16, 2003
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - Rush Limbaugh's attorneys went on the offensive yesterday, in an effort to keep the conservative radio commentator's medical records sealed after they recently were seized by prosecutors investigating his prescription drug use. Limbaugh's attorneys filed a court action asking a judge to review the propriety of the seizure of the medical records, which are under seal and haven't been reviewed by prosecutors. They asked for a hearing in the next three days to assert Limbaugh's right to privacy and to prevent prosecutors from gaining access to them.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2014
Two women pleaded guilty Friday to using stolen medical records to open or take over credit accounts at department stores and setting up a cottage industry selling fraudulently obtained goods. Chanell Cole, 30, and Yolanda Welch, 39, are scheduled to be sentenced in federal court in Baltimore in April. Until 2010 Cole, who is from Owings Mills, was the only employee of a rheumatologist at Good Samaritan Hospital in Baltimore and had access to the doctor's files, which she abused to obtain the names addresses and social security numbers of patients.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
Former cardiologist Mark Midei improperly placed three stents in the heart of a prominent businessman who didn't need them, a Baltimore County jury ruled Wednesday in a malpractice case. The jury also found the former owners of St. Joseph Medical Center partly responsible because Midei appeared to be its representative, which means that the penalty phase of the trial can go forward to determine how much both defendants should pay. The lawsuit seeks $150 million in damages, including from lost income and emotional distress.
HEALTH
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2013
Attorneys for former star cardiologist Mark Midei tried — and failed — to argue for a mistrial during opening statements Friday in a medical malpractice trial, the latest in a string of cases accusing the doctor of placing unnecessary stents in heart patients. Plaintiff Glenn Weinberg, a prominent Baltimore businessman, contends that he lost at least $50 million after scaling back his career because Midei falsely led him to believe that he had serious coronary artery disease to justify expensive medical intervention.
NEWS
July 20, 2012
I find The Sun's editorial regarding Mitt Romney's tax returns somewhat comical ("Many unhappy returns?" July 19). First, why the outcry for years of back tax returns other than something for the Democrats (and their spokesmen in the so-called mainstream media) to use for the insidious game of class warfare. Next, I see that you quote droves of "establishment" Republicans, certainly not any legitimate conservative tea party representatives as your primary source of cries from the GOP to release the records.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2012
A day after the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention cut in half the threshold for determining lead exposure in the nation's children, pediatricians faced the task of identifying new cases from thousands of their old files. The recommendation from the CDC recognizes what doctors have long believed: that any amount of lead can be harmful. And they expressed satisfaction that the level was lowered. But the new guidance will likely pose new logistical and financial challenges for doctors and public health officials.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2011
A Baltimore law firm lost a portable hard drive containing information about its cases, including medical records for 161 stent patients suing cardiologist Dr. Mark G. Midei, a firm client, for alleged malpractice at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson. The drive was lost Aug. 4 by an employee of Baxter, Baker, Sidle, Conn & Jones who was traveling on the Baltimore light rail, according to a letter obtained by The Baltimore Sun that was sent to one of the stent patients last week — two months after the drive went missing.
SPORTS
By Walter Pacheco and Walter Pacheco,Tribune Newspapers | December 1, 2009
ORLANDO, Fla. - -Tiger Woods pulled out of his last planned tournament appearance of the year Monday amid mounting worldwide attention to the one-car crash outside his home that trashed a fire hydrant and wrecked Woods' Cadillac SUV last weekend. The world's top-ranked golfer said his injuries from the accident early Friday would make it impossible to compete in the Chevron World Challenge, which benefits his charities. Woods, who has declined to discuss the accident with investigators, apologized for his absence in a statement on his Web site.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Roch Kubatko and Jeff Zrebiec and Roch Kubatko,Sun reporters | May 9, 2007
The Orioles are being pulled back into baseball's steroid controversy, but it's their past, not their present, that reportedly is under scrutiny. In today's editions, The New York Times reports that the club has been asked to send the medical records of former team members David Segui, Rafael Palmeiro, Sammy Sosa, Jason Grimsley and Fernando Tatis to the players. Those players will be asked to authorize release of the records to a group headed by former Sen. George Mitchell. Mitchell is leading a yearlong investigation into steroid use in baseball.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2011
Margaret E. Faya, a retired medical records supervisor at Spring Grove Hospital Center, died June 21 of complications of an infection at Howard County General Hospital. The Columbia resident was 91. Born Mary Elizabeth Burkman in Baltimore, she grew up on North Rose Street in East Baltimore. In an autobiographical sketch, she recalled her childhood as the daughter of a father who worked in the seafood industry shucking oysters. Her mother sewed buttons on men's shirts at the Aetna shirt factory.
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