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Medical Privacy

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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 10, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Clinton administration officials say they will soon propose a comprehensive federal law to protect the privacy of medical records, to let consumers inspect their own files and to punish any unauthorized disclosures of personal data by hospitals, insurers, health plans or drug companies.The measure would establish minimum federal standards to control the use of such information in the era of managed care, when insurance companies and health maintenance organizations have the ability and, in many cases, a financial incentive to collect and sell data revealing patients' most intimate secrets.
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NEWS
By Jenny Black | April 14, 2014
An absolute right to privacy in health care is enshrined in the oath all medical professionals must take. Providers understand they cannot effectively treat a patient if that patient cannot trust that his or her medical information will remain confidential. Certain types of insurance communications can inadvertently compromise medical privacy, such as the Explanation of Benefits (EOB) sent to policy-holders whenever an insurance policy is used by a family member. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 20, 2000
WASHINGTON - After nine months of blistering criticism from doctors, patients and consumer groups, the Clinton administration says it has decided to beef up protections for the privacy of medical records, beyond what it proposed last year. But administration officials said the new rules, to be issued before the Nov. 7 election, would not give patients full control of their medical records, as many advocates of privacy rights had recommended. The rules would, however, establish comprehensive federal standards requiring doctors, hospitals, pharmacists and insurance companies to limit the disclosure of medical information about individual patients.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2013
Towson confirmed Thursday morning that a member of the football team fell ill Monday and was hospitalized. Citing HIPPA laws that protect the medical privacy of individuals, the university did not name the player. The player was transferred Tuesday from the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson to the Shock Trauma Center of the University of Maryland Medical Center in Baltimore, where he was listed in critical condition Thursday, said hospital spokesperson Cindy Rivers.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 13, 2001
WASHINGTON - President Bush announced yesterday that he would allow sweeping rules to protect the privacy of medical records to go into effect tomorrow. But he said the rules, issued by President Bill Clinton, could be modified later to address "legitimate concerns" of the health care industry. By allowing the rules to take effect, despite the administration's view that some provisions are unworkable, Bush avoided the firestorm of criticism that surrounded the rollback of other Clinton administration policies.
TOPIC
By Sarah Kellogg | June 27, 1999
WASHINGTON -- If you want to keep a secret, it's best not to tell it in your doctor's office.Medical records routinely end up in the hands of insurance companies, employers, police officers, researchers and drug firms. It's easier to protect the titles of last weekend's video rentals than your test results.That's because Congress has protected the right to privacy when it comes to video rentals. No federal law protects the confidentiality of personal medical information.But Congress is hoping to change that.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 10, 2002
WASHINGTON - The Bush administration formally rolled back yesterday some major protections for the privacy of medical records adopted by President Bill Clinton. But at the same time, it also set new standards for the use of personal data to market prescription drugs and other health care products. The rules, the first comprehensive federal standards for medical privacy, will affect virtually every doctor, patient, hospital, drugstore, health insurance company and medical researcher in the United States.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1998
A decade ago, intimate medical secrets were likely to remain safely locked in a doctor's file cabinet.Today, data banks and the Internet help deliver those details to public health departments, managed care groups, labs, pharmacies and even employers, with little or no regulation."
NEWS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2013
Towson confirmed Thursday morning that a member of the football team fell ill Monday and was hospitalized. Citing HIPPA laws that protect the medical privacy of individuals, the university did not name the player. The player was transferred Tuesday from the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson to the Shock Trauma Center of the University of Maryland Medical Center in Baltimore, where he was listed in critical condition Thursday, said hospital spokesperson Cindy Rivers.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2003
New federal rules on medical privacy go into effect tomorrow, ushering in added patient protections - and a proliferation of paperwork. The regulations allow doctors, hospitals and insurers to share information needed for treatment and billing, but give patients control over other uses of health data. For example, patients checking into a hospital will be asked to sign forms in which they can indicate who may - and who may not - be given information about their treatment. "How many times have you called the hospital for somebody you know, and talked to the nurse?
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2011
Are you ready for Watson to join you and your doctor in the examining room? That could be the outcome of a collaboration under way between Watson's creators at IBM and experts at the University of Maryland's School of Medicine. They have begun work on merging the speech recognition and question-answering skills of Watson — the computer that beat two humans on "Jeopardy!" this week — with the vast stores of clinical knowledge and analytical skills in the medical profession.
NEWS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2003
Sally Finkel thought she was trained and ready when new federal medical privacy rules took effect last week. But the administrator of a 12-doctor practice in Lutherville wasn't expecting this. The office document shredder was operating at such an intense pitch that the head of medical records rebelled - asking that the whining machine be operated only after she was gone for the day. Some patients were balking at signing forms that said they acknowledged the new rules. Others were asking so many questions that it caused appointment delays.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2003
New federal rules on medical privacy go into effect tomorrow, ushering in added patient protections - and a proliferation of paperwork. The regulations allow doctors, hospitals and insurers to share information needed for treatment and billing, but give patients control over other uses of health data. For example, patients checking into a hospital will be asked to sign forms in which they can indicate who may - and who may not - be given information about their treatment. "How many times have you called the hospital for somebody you know, and talked to the nurse?
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 6, 2003
WASHINGTON - When Dr. Stephen C. Albrecht of Olympia, Wash., called a hospital in Tacoma recently to inquire about one of his patients, an 18-year- old being treated for an infectious disease, he had trouble getting information. Meanwhile, under a new policy at the Hebrew Home of Greater Washington, a nursing home in Rockville, callers can get information about patients only if they have a password. And Dr. Matthew J. Messina, a dentist in Fairview Park, Ohio, near Cleveland, said he had changed the schedule posted each day in his treatment room so patients would be identified only by their first names.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 10, 2002
WASHINGTON - The Bush administration formally rolled back yesterday some major protections for the privacy of medical records adopted by President Bill Clinton. But at the same time, it also set new standards for the use of personal data to market prescription drugs and other health care products. The rules, the first comprehensive federal standards for medical privacy, will affect virtually every doctor, patient, hospital, drugstore, health insurance company and medical researcher in the United States.
NEWS
By John M. Freeman | June 7, 2002
CAN PATIENT confidentiality and medical research coexist? The answer could lie in Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy G. Thompson's proposed changes to the rigid privacy rules announced by Bill Clinton as he was leaving office. Privacy zealots had convinced Mr. Clinton that highly restrictive rules were needed to prevent abuses of patients' medical records. But the draft regulations went too far. They could prove difficult to implement, seriously retard life-saving medical research and impede a patient's access to care.
NEWS
By Jenny Black | April 14, 2014
An absolute right to privacy in health care is enshrined in the oath all medical professionals must take. Providers understand they cannot effectively treat a patient if that patient cannot trust that his or her medical information will remain confidential. Certain types of insurance communications can inadvertently compromise medical privacy, such as the Explanation of Benefits (EOB) sent to policy-holders whenever an insurance policy is used by a family member. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2011
Are you ready for Watson to join you and your doctor in the examining room? That could be the outcome of a collaboration under way between Watson's creators at IBM and experts at the University of Maryland's School of Medicine. They have begun work on merging the speech recognition and question-answering skills of Watson — the computer that beat two humans on "Jeopardy!" this week — with the vast stores of clinical knowledge and analytical skills in the medical profession.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 13, 2001
WASHINGTON - President Bush announced yesterday that he would allow sweeping rules to protect the privacy of medical records to go into effect tomorrow. But he said the rules, issued by President Bill Clinton, could be modified later to address "legitimate concerns" of the health care industry. By allowing the rules to take effect, despite the administration's view that some provisions are unworkable, Bush avoided the firestorm of criticism that surrounded the rollback of other Clinton administration policies.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 20, 2000
WASHINGTON - After nine months of blistering criticism from doctors, patients and consumer groups, the Clinton administration says it has decided to beef up protections for the privacy of medical records, beyond what it proposed last year. But administration officials said the new rules, to be issued before the Nov. 7 election, would not give patients full control of their medical records, as many advocates of privacy rights had recommended. The rules would, however, establish comprehensive federal standards requiring doctors, hospitals, pharmacists and insurance companies to limit the disclosure of medical information about individual patients.
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