Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMedical Practice
IN THE NEWS

Medical Practice

HEALTH
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
Two years after a Maryland doctor lost his medical license for using a controversial treatment for autistic patients, the state Board of Physicians has suspended his business partner for allegedly writing the same dangerous prescription for several patients. The board suspended John L. Young's license to practice medicine in the state Feb. 13. On Feb. 21, Young resigned from his post on the University System of Maryland's Board of Regents, citing a desire to "devote more time to other activities.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 12, 2006
Dr. Ralph Weber, a cardiologist who practiced at area hospitals for more than 50 years, died of cancer Sunday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Pikesville resident was 77. Born in Baltimore and raised on Park Avenue in Reservoir Hill, he attended the Robert E. Lee Junior High School No. 49 and was a 1945 City College graduate. He earned a bachelor's degree in biology and chemistry from Franklin & Marshall College and completed his medical education at the Temple University School of Medicine.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 13, 1998
AFTER 24 YEARS treating the medical needs of Central County, Dr. Arnold G. Alexander plans to retire Aug. 28."I always thought of my medical practice as kind of a mom-and-pop business since my wife, Ellen, has worked on the business end with me for the past 17 years," the doctor said."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | January 18, 2007
Dr. Jeannette R. "Jeff" Heghinian, a retired physician who drove to house calls in colorful convertibles during nearly five decades of medical practice, died of pneumonia Saturday at Genesis ElderCare Hamilton Center. The Mount Washington resident was 97. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., she could recall marching alongside her schoolteacher mother in women's right-to-vote rallies in New York. She moved to Baltimore's Rusk Avenue with her parents and was a 1927 graduate of Western High School. She determined to become a physician while recovering from a childhood case of scarlet fever, a condition that left her with a heart murmur.
NEWS
July 2, 2000
Dr. Earl M. Beardsley, 75, physician, traveler, volunteer Dr. Earl Miller Beardsley, who maintained a general medical practice in Salisbury for more than three decades, died Tuesday from complications of Alzheimer's disease at the Perry Point Medical Center. He was 75. In addition to his medical practice, Dr. Beardsley had served as medical director of Wicomico Nursing Home from 1967 to 1969 and Salisbury Nursing Home from 1970 to 1988. He also was on the staff of, was chief of general practice at, and served on committees at Peninsula Regional Medical Center from 1954 to 1988.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | July 30, 1991
The director of a major department at Harbor Hospital Center, alleging he was fired without reason and due process from his $120,000- a-year position, today filed a $14 million suit against the hospital in Baltimore Circuit Court.Dr. Victor R. Hrehorovich, 51, contends that he was arbitrarily dismissed as head of the department of medicine by the former South Baltimore General Hospital, contrary to medical staff bylaws that assure department heads tenure until they are 65 after they have passed a two-year trial period.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Eric Siegel and Scott Higham and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | August 19, 1996
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's wife is president of an eye-care practice that has received more than $2.2 million from a nonprofit group that has a city contract to treat tens of thousands of elderly Medicare patients in Baltimore, records show.The mayor has disqualified himself from any decisions involving the nonprofit group. He also has received a city ethics opinion finding no conflict of interest with Dr. Patricia L. Schmoke doing business with the group.Discussions of Dr. Schmoke's involvement in the contract surfaced during a City Council meeting in May, when city Health Department officials proposed transferring a city-owned building to the nonprofit group in exchange for $1.Asked about his wife's relationship with the group, Schmoke said: "I'm not troubled by this at all."
NEWS
May 27, 1995
Defining the Gray Area of Medical PracticePerhaps It is coincidence, but the three articles on the front page and the Perspective section May 14 certainly point up the increasing attention- to HMOs.It is instructive to note that while HMOs, in fact if not in name, were in existence long before, the big push behind their creation today was in the 1960s and 1970s.Those leading the effort, almost a crusade, were the idealistic physicians and health economists who believed in the HMO concept, the emphases on preventive care for a fixed amount of prepaid dollars, as a more rational system for delivering both - quality and cost effective care.
NEWS
By Michael James and Joan Jacobson and Michael James and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | September 3, 1998
No one has stopped Baltimore's "telemedicine man." Not the federal agents who raided his offices, not the state physicians' -- board that has subpoenaed his records, not the former patients who claim he is a reckless doctor loose on the Internet.Eleven months after the widely publicized raid that appeared to end Dr. Pietr Hitzig's medical practice, the resilient and computer-savvy doctor is still online and running a downtown Baltimore treatment center.He has no examining room, no stethoscope, no lab coat.
NEWS
By Daniel S. Greenberg | September 9, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Don't expect anything but a hemorrhage at the Treasury from that new program to counter the doctor surplus by paying hospitals to reduce the number of residency slots for the final phase of medical training.Reminiscent of the agricultural-support schemes that paid farmers for not growing crops, the medical plan was inspired by pTC an immutable law of American medical practice: More doctors mean more medical spending, despite the penny-pinching tactics of managed care. So, stop them before they can start hustling patients, the Washington strategists concluded.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.