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By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,tyeesha.dixon@baltsun.com | December 23, 2008
Charter Internal Medicine, a 9,000-patient primary care medical office in Howard County, has announced that it is reversing plans to cease accepting health insurance and switch to a retainer-style practice next month after state regulators expressed concern over whether such operations should be classified as insurance carriers. In October, the five-physician practice informed patients of the planned move to "retainer-based primary care," a model under which patients would be charged a flat fee of $2,000 a year.
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BUSINESS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
An Annapolis medical practice will pay $22,500 to a former employee who claimed she was discriminated against because she was pregnant. Officials for Annapolis Internal Medicine said Tuesday they agreed to the payment to settle a lawsuit filed last year by the U.S. Equal Opportunity Commission on behalf of the employee. Jonathan P. Kagan, an attorney for Annapolis Internal Medicine, said the doctors decided to settle rather than bear the expense of defending it at trial. The doctors deny any wrongdoing, he said.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2003
Naomi J. Porterfield, a nurse who assisted her physician husband's medical practice in what was then rural Carroll County, died of congestive heart failure Aug. 30 at her Hampstead home. She was 100. She was born Naomi Johnson and raised in Middleburg, Carroll County, the daughter of a carriage maker. "After the eighth grade, she rode a Western Maryland Railway passenger train to Westminster, where she attended high school," said her son, Richard M. Porterfield of Hampstead. One of her fondest memories, which she enjoyed recounting, was traveling to Washington by train in 1913 to attend Woodrow Wilson's presidential inauguration.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
The owner of a Columbia medical practice was ordered to pay more than $142,600 in restitution and other costs for failing to remit employee contributions and loan repayments to the company's 401K plan, the U.S. Department of Labor said Thursday. David O. Nyanjom, Laura Nyanjom, Pulmonary Disease & Critical Care Associates and the company's 401 (k) plan must pay $66,474 in unremitted contributions and payments and the balance in pre-judgment interest and costs of appointing an independent fiduciary according to a consent judgment in a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2012
Vera R. Carnes, a homemaker who earlier had been a bookkeeper, died Saturday of a stroke at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville. She was 94. Born in Baltimore and raised on 33rd Street, Vera Miller attended the Bryn Mawr School and graduated from Eastern High School. She attended the College of William & Mary and in 1938 married Dr. William J. Rysanek Jr., a Baltimore obstetrician and gynecologist. Mrs. Carnes was the bookkeeper for her husband's private medical practice, said her son, William J. Rysanek III of Raleigh, N.C. He died in 1978.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2013
The U.S. Department of Labor said Friday that it is suing a Columbia medical practice for allegedly failing to forward more than $100,000 in employee contributions and loan repayments to a 401(k) retirement plan. The agency said its Employee Benefits Security Administration found that Pulmonary Disease & Critical Care Associates, its owner, Dr. David O. Nyanjom, and practice administrator Laura Nyanjom did not remit $103,630 in payments between November 2006 and April 2012. Employees of the practice and of Patuxent Hospitalists participated in the plan, the agency said.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | July 10, 2007
James G. Linz, a financial planner who had administered a medical practice, died of cancer Friday at his Timonium home. He was 54. Born in Baltimore and raised in Parkville, he was a 1971 graduate of Calvert Hall College High School. He earned an accounting degree at Loyola College, where he also received a master's degree. While an undergraduate, he played soccer and as a freshman was a member of the school's 1971 championship team. He worked in grants and contracts at the University of Maryland in downtown Baltimore and later went on to be chief executive officer at a physicians practice based at its Shock Trauma Center.
BUSINESS
By Jane Applegate and Jane Applegate,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | January 27, 1992
Selling any small business is an emotional and traumatic experience.Selling a professional practice is even more complex and painful.The departing doctor or dentist not only has to say goodbye to his or her livelihood, but to patients, colleagues and friends.But with careful planning, an expert appraisal and an experienced broker, a successful sale is possible. And when timed right, the sale brings financial and personal freedom, according to professionals who have sold their practices."The sale opened up a whole new life of freedom for me," said Dr. Sandra Beth Katz, an ophthalmologist who spent nine years treating patients in her renovated Victorian home in Augusta, Me.Swamped with patients, Dr. Katz recruited a partner from Wisconsin.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2001
A doctor who had a family medical practice near Atlanta turned himself in to federal authorities in Baltimore last night on charges that he fatally stabbed his ex-wife two weeks ago, almost severing her head from her body and burying her in the crawl space beneath his suburban Georgia home, federal agents said. Eric Robert Wooten, 34, had been on the run with his two sons, ages 5 and 4, since July 10, when police found his ex-wife's body wrapped in a carpet underneath the home. She had been reported missing by relatives July 9. Baltimore FBI spokesman Peter A. Gulotta said agents had focused their search in the Baltimore-Washington area after learning that most of Wooten's family lives in the area.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | July 30, 1991
The director of a major department at Harbor Hospital Center, alleging he was fired without reason and due process from his $120,000- a-year position, today filed a $14 million suit against the hospital in Baltimore Circuit Court.Dr. Victor R. Hrehorovich, 51, contends that he was arbitrarily dismissed as head of the department of medicine by the former South Baltimore General Hospital, contrary to medical staff bylaws that assure department heads tenure until they are 65 after they have passed a two-year trial period.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
Three Maryland medical practices and a medical billing company have agreed to pay $3.3 million to settle an investigation into Medicare overbilling, federal prosecutors said Tuesday. Advanced Cardiology Center, a cardiovascular practice in Rockville, and its owners Dr. Pankaj Lal, Dr. Mubashar Choudry and Dr. Moshin Ijaz agreed to pay $1.9 million; Kenilworth Internists PA in Riverdale and Dr. Reva Gill agreed to pay $242,204; and Dr. Sureshkumar Muttath, an internal medicine doctor in Riverdale, agreed to pay $659,726.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
Jeffrey F. Ritter, a physician's assistant who was recalled for his bedside manner and willingness to listen, died Friday of cardiac arrest related to kidney disease at Hanover Hospital in Pennsylvania. The former Westminster resident was 55. Born in Baltimore and raised in Ellicott City, he was the son of Gregory B. Ritter, a retired Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. worker, and Josephine O. Foster Ritter, a homemaker and real estate sales agent, who died this year. Mr. Ritter was a 1976 graduate of Howard High School, where he ran track.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2013
My mom showed me the spot on her face recently diagnosed as skin cancer. "I showed it to my dermatologist last time, but he just kept saying it was psoriasis," she said. Finally, on her last visit, she insisted he take a closer look, and bingo. Basal cell. "You need a new dermatologist," I said, and she looked at me in dismay. She'd apparently already gone through three others who didn't work out to get to this one. I felt her pain. Finding new doctors is just as much fun as blind dating; you start out hopeful, but chances are good that there might be some sort of compatibility issue, such as his inability to ask you a single thing about yourself while he shares an hourlong recount of his 1993 weeklong trip to Shenzhen.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2013
The U.S. Department of Labor said Friday that it is suing a Columbia medical practice for allegedly failing to forward more than $100,000 in employee contributions and loan repayments to a 401(k) retirement plan. The agency said its Employee Benefits Security Administration found that Pulmonary Disease & Critical Care Associates, its owner, Dr. David O. Nyanjom, and practice administrator Laura Nyanjom did not remit $103,630 in payments between November 2006 and April 2012. Employees of the practice and of Patuxent Hospitalists participated in the plan, the agency said.
HEALTH
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
Two years after a Maryland doctor lost his medical license for using a controversial treatment for autistic patients, the state Board of Physicians has suspended his business partner for allegedly writing the same dangerous prescription for several patients. The board suspended John L. Young's license to practice medicine in the state Feb. 13. On Feb. 21, Young resigned from his post on the University System of Maryland's Board of Regents, citing a desire to "devote more time to other activities.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2012
Vera R. Carnes, a homemaker who earlier had been a bookkeeper, died Saturday of a stroke at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville. She was 94. Born in Baltimore and raised on 33rd Street, Vera Miller attended the Bryn Mawr School and graduated from Eastern High School. She attended the College of William & Mary and in 1938 married Dr. William J. Rysanek Jr., a Baltimore obstetrician and gynecologist. Mrs. Carnes was the bookkeeper for her husband's private medical practice, said her son, William J. Rysanek III of Raleigh, N.C. He died in 1978.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | January 15, 1995
C When Dr. Lawrence Gordon opens his family medical practice next month in Mount Airy, he plans to spend most of his time with patients instead of struggling to keep up with insurance paperwork and billing.He'll leave most of the business of medicine to Carroll County General Hospital.The hospital owns Dr. Gordon's practice and will pay his salary, take care of billing, hire staff and handle other administrative tasks.Dr. Gordon comes to Mount Airy after five years of running a solo practice in Collinsville, Va."
NEWS
March 28, 2006
Dr. Steven N. Shaffer, a Carroll County internist who was also medical director of several area nursing homes, died of brain cancer March 21 at his Manchester home. He was 48. Born in Hanover, Pa., and raised in Hampstead, Dr. Shaffer was a 1975 graduate of North Carroll High School. He earned a bachelor's degree and a master's degree in chemical engineering from the University of Maryland, College Park. He was a 1984 graduate of the University of Maryland Medical School, and, after completing a residency at York Hospital in York, Pa., established his medical practice in Hampstead in 1987.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2011
Eleanor V. Broadwater, business manager of a family medical practice, died Sunday of a heart attack at St. Joseph Medical Center. The Cockeysville resident was 69. The daughter of a B&O Railroad brakeman and a homemaker, the former Eleanor Virginia Sagal was born and raised in Keyser, W.Va. After graduating in 1959 from Keyser High School, she attended Catherman Business School in Keyser. She was married in 1964 to Dr. Ronald Lee Broadwater and moved to Morgantown, where her husband attended medical school at West Virginia University.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,robert.little@baltsun.com | April 19, 2009
The Johns Hopkins Hospital and a handful of other medical centers around the country are set this week to begin collectively monitoring and tracking dangerous reactions to blood transfusions, the first piece of a nationwide "biovigilance" program that is arriving in the United States years later than in most other developed nations. The ultimate goal of the project, a collaboration between federal agencies and private medical associations, is to reduce the number of infections, allergic reactions, clerical errors and other complications related to blood transfusions.
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