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NEWS
October 4, 1994
Dr. Calvin Robinson Dyer has joined the orthopedic department of the Columbia Medical Plan at the HMO's Columbia location. After graduating from Johns Hopkins University with a degree in biomedical engineering, Dr. Dyer received his medical degree from Vanderbilt University in 1988.He completed his residency at the University of California in 1993.Before joining Columbia Medical Plan, Dr. Dyer completed a sports medicine and arthroscopy fellowship in Nashville, Tenn.
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NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
Nearly 100 medical marijuana dispensaries could be opened across Maryland under a bill approved by a key Senate committee Tuesday. The measure approved 10-1 by the Judicial Proceedings Committee would create a medical marijuana program significantly different than the version approved by the House of Delegates. The House plan calls for 10 licensed pot growers that would also operate all dispensaries. Senators said they worried the House version would create a monopoly of pot growers who could control medical marijuana prices and wield considerable political power.
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NEWS
By M. William Salganik and Diana K. Sugg and M. William Salganik and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1996
WASHINGTON -- In a move that will help consumers and employers compare the quality of health plans, an industry group yesterday released a report that places the Columbia Medical Plan among the top five for "quality of care" in the country.Using data available to the public for the first time, the report measures plans' performance in dozens of ways such as the percentage of immunized children, the rate of births by Caesarean section and the percentage of doctors who are accepting new patients.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | March 21, 2014
With an eye toward women voters, Democratic gubernatorial candidate Heather R. Mizeur called Thursday for Maryland to provide paid leave for workers who need time off to care for children or ailing relatives. Under her plan, state aid to those who need to take off work would be financed by a surcharge on workers' paychecks. Mizeur called for the ambitious program as she released a campaign proposal called “Empowering Maryland Women” that also calls for stronger efforts to ensure equal pay for equal work in Maryland.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,Sun Staff Writer | June 27, 1995
A newly established partnership between the nonprofit Columbia Association and the Columbia Medical Plan will let 150 Howard County employers buy low-cost packages for health education programs and health and fitness memberships.The partnership, announced yesterday, will be made available to county employers with 50 or more workers.The packages offer health education programs on such topics as infant care, emotional well-being and smoking cessation to any employer who also takes part in CA's fitness and health clubs.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | June 2, 1994
The newly installed chief operating officer for the Columbia Medical Plan said his main goal for the health maintenance organization is to continue its service to the community and enhance overall profit margins.Alfred J. Discepolo, who began work at the Columbia-based HMO last month, is responsible for the operation and strategic planning of the medical plan, which is a subsidiary of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland."What's necessary here is good management, continuing the great success this plan has had in this community," said Mr. Discepolo.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff writer | December 30, 1991
In 1969, James E. Jordan joined four other doctors to introduce the state's first prepaid medical plan, formed to care for residents of James Rouse's new planned community in Howard County.Jordan, now president of the Columbia Medical Plan, recalls that the concept was foreign to most Marylanders in those days.Since then, the plan has expanded to Anne Arundel County. The number of patients served at the Annapolis regional center and three satellites has jumped from 500 in 1984 to about 24,000, and the total served plan-wide has increased from 19,000 in 1980 to 72,000.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | March 24, 1994
A Severn woman who is terminally ill with cancer has filed a $42 million civil suit against Columbia Medical Plan Inc., charging that the HMO's doctors misdiagnosed her illness.Kathleen Heidecker and her husband, William Heidecker, contend in the suit that the health maintenance organization's doctors misread mammograms and failed to determine that she had cancerous lesions in one of her breasts.The cancer was not detected until the 49-year-old woman went to another physician, but by then the disease had spread to her lymph nodes, leaving her with little chance for recovery, the suit says.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | August 17, 1993
Minutes before Karen Kolan arrived at Columbia Medical Plan off Thunder Hill Road for a scheduled pediatrics appointment, the doctor was called away on an emergency.Staff members apologized for the inconvenience -- and gave the Ellicott City woman a $5 voucher for her trouble.Ms. Kolan said the staff did "all they could do" under the circumstances -- "apologize and give me a voucher."That voucher, and thousands like it, are the core of an unusual program intended to demonstrate the health plan's commitment to prompt service.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | September 15, 1994
Vjacheslav Galkin has helped to develop new drugs and medical equipment in his native Russia, but he toured Columbia Medical Plan this week in hopes of expanding his knowledge."
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2010
Many workers during open enrollment usually stick with whatever medical plan they had the year before, but health care reform may change that. About two-thirds of consumers recently polled by insurance giant UnitedHealthcare said they will look more closely at their choices during enrollment season thanks to the debate over the new law. This extra level of scrutiny can pay off. If you don't look into the details, you might be tempted to go...
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | January 11, 2009
Crafting a new way to extend medical services to uninsured residents has proved tricky for county health officials. The health staff was initially overwhelmed in October, when 1,100 people came to the East Columbia library during nine sessions to enroll in Healthy Howard Inc. All but 66 turned out to be eligible for four existing insurance plans for limited-income people. Now county health officer Dr. Peter Beilenson has come up with a new plan to reopen enrollment while trying to counter criticism from County Council member Greg Fox, a Fulton Republican.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN REPORTER | August 1, 2008
Maryland's biggest medical malpractice insurer yesterday proposed a 2 percent cut in premiums, continuing a gradual drawdown in rates that doctors said was needed for them to avoid financial disaster. The proposed change comes as payouts for medical claims are holding steady after spiking unexpectedly more than four years ago, igniting a furor that led to a special legislative session in late 2004. The reduction proposed by the Medical Mutual Liability Insurance Society of Maryland comes on top of an 8 percent rate cut the insurer agreed to in December.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,Sun reporter | November 30, 2006
The University of Maryland School of Medicine unveiled plans yesterday for a splashy, yearlong celebration to mark the institution's bicentennial. The school, founded in 1807, is the oldest public medical school in the country. Highlights of the anniversary celebration, which are scheduled to kick off in January, include: A series of free public lectures at the Hippodrome Theatre with singer Patti LaBelle, former U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno, and retired Oriole Cal Ripken. A live radio broadcast of A Prairie Home Companion with Garrison Keillor.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2004
The Anne Arundel Medical Center is planning to open the county's first free dental clinic for adults this year at the downtown Annapolis site where the center runs a medical clinic. The center has collected more than the clinic's estimated $50,000 operating costs in grants and donations to cover equipment expenses and has three dentists lined up to volunteer their services, said Bill West, director of community health and awareness. West said that the clinic could open in the fall. "We see so many people coming into our regular clinic who really need dental care but, right now, we don't have anywhere to send them," West said.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2004
Pushed by a rising demand for medical care, the Anne Arundel Medical Center in Parole is beginning a nine-month planning process for possible expansion. The center moved from its longtime downtown home to its 103-acre campus in Parole two years ago, but the same rise in demand that prompted that move is causing hospital leaders to look for new ways to grow, said Martin L. Doordan, president of the Anne Arundel Health System. "I would expect that in the future, this will be a much different place," Doordan said.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Staff Writer | January 19, 1994
Does it seem that half the people around you are sniffling, sneezing, wheezing, coughing and generally feeling like heck right about now?Two weeks ago, 1,680 medical workers around the country reported that roughly 126,880,000 people -- about half the population -- had cold and flu symptoms as of Jan. 7, according to a survey by the SmithKline Beecham pharmaceutical company.Although that's a lot of ailing folks, doctors say it is the time of year for colds."I am seeing a lot of people with respiratory infections of one kind or another," says Dr. James Richardson, who practices family medicine at the University of Maryland Medical System.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Sun Staff Writer | March 21, 1995
Feeling ignored and increasingly desperate, a group of disabled men and women who receive a subsistence allowance from the state said yesterday that if the payments are discontinued, many recipients will have no alternative but to turn to crime."
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Paul Adams and Gus G. Sentementes and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2003
Stanley Morris never believed it would come to this. When he retired from Sparrows Point in 1997 with 43 1/2 years of service, Morris, 68, thought he was secure with health care benefits from Bethlehem Steel Corp., which covered him and his wife at a cost of $150 a month. But now, Morris and other retirees say, Bethlehem has turned its back on retirees of Sparrows Point and its other steel mills. Bethlehem, which agreed over the weekend to be sold to International Steel Group Inc. of Cleveland, announced Friday that it planned to end health and life insurance benefits for retirees and dependents March 31 - a devastating blow to 19,000 Baltimore-area retirees and dependents.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2001
Amid increasing clamor and rumor about unhealthy conditions and serious illness at Baltimore's Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Courthouse, city health and court officials announced plans yesterday for a medical survey of all personnel there to pinpoint the source of and address any problems. The health survey - to be conducted through a questionnaire by the city Health Department and occupational medicine staff of Johns Hopkins Hospital - was requested by Judge Ellen M. Heller, administrative judge of the city Circuit Court.
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