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NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | July 26, 1996
The director of health services for state prisoners said yesterday that he was considering adding medical personnel at the Central Booking and Intake Center after complaints that the system for taking care of sick prisoners is costly and insufficient.Dr. Anthony Swetz, director of inmate health services for the state Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services, said the department might take steps to provide medical care for booking center prisoners before they have had bail reviews.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
A longtime Army civilian at Aberdeen Proving Ground died after a "grass cutting incident" at work on Tuesday, officials said. Willie Stevenson, 61, was severely injured while he was riding a lawn mower near the Route 24 Gate on the Edgewood side of the Army post, spokesman Kelly Luster said. He did not describe what happened. Emergency personnel were called to the scene at about 9:15 a.m., Luster said. Stevenson was taken by helicopter to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center, where medical personnel were unable to save his life.
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FEATURES
By Mary G. Ramos and Mary G. Ramos,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | November 26, 1995
Staging the Boston Marathon is an effort that resembles a major military operation.In an average year, it involves almost 5,000 volunteers, 570 medical personnel, 500 barricades, 40 delivery trucks, 200 buses, 5,000 bags of ice, more than 1,000 uniformed police officers, 170 massage therapists, 70 physical therapists, 100 podiatrists, 20 tents, 400 tables, 200 two-way radios, 65 shuttle buses. And 8,000 balloons, 24,000 feet of ribbon, 130 country flags, 58 national anthems.There are 13 YMCA water stations with 75 volunteers at each one to deliver almost 20,000 gallons of spring water and 20,000 gallons of sport drink in 350,000 cups to the athletes.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2014
A 27-year-old Dundalk man died Friday afternoon after being struck by a vehicle as he crossed Pulaski Highway on foot, police said. Paul Robert Mack, of the 6800 block of Broening Road, was not in a crosswalk when he was hit by a 2007 Honda Accord traveling westbound on Pulaski Highway at the Harford County line, police said. He was declared dead on the scene by medical personnel. Police said the driver of the Accord remained on scene and the Baltimore County police crash team was investigating.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2014
A 27-year-old Dundalk man died Friday afternoon after being struck by a vehicle as he crossed Pulaski Highway on foot, police said. Paul Robert Mack, of the 6800 block of Broening Road, was not in a crosswalk when he was hit by a 2007 Honda Accord traveling westbound on Pulaski Highway at the Harford County line, police said. He was declared dead on the scene by medical personnel. Police said the driver of the Accord remained on scene and the Baltimore County police crash team was investigating.
NEWS
By Providence (R.I.) Journal-Bulletin | December 24, 1991
KIMBERLY BERGALIS died of AIDS at the age of 23. She was not a drug abuser who shared tainted intravenous needles, nor did she ever engage in unsafe sex. All she did was visit her dentist.Little could she have known that by the time she left his office, she would be infected with the AIDS virus that has now taken her life. Her dentist, Dr. David Acer of Stuart, Fla., knew that he had been carrying the AIDS virus for several years.Regrettably, most health-care organizations have joined forces to resist a reasonable proposal that is aimed at minimizing even further the admittedly rare likelihood of similar tragedies in the future.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 26, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- The Federal Aviation Administration has refused to turn over to investigators the medical records of an air traffic controller who directed two airliners onto the same runway at Los Angeles International Airport moments before one struck the other in a fiery crash.The National Transportation Safety Board had requested the records pertaining to Robin Lee Wascher and other controllers as part of its continuing investigation to determine the cause of the Feb. 1 collision between a USAir Boeing 737 and a Skywest commuter plane that killed 34.But on Feb. 22, James B. Busey, administrator of the FAA, which ZTC employs controllers at civilian facilities throughout the United States, departed from customary policy and declined to release the records.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 20, 2004
U.S. military medical personnel grossly abused medical ethics at Baghdad's Abu Ghraib prison, helping to design interrogation techniques, turning their backs on abuse by guards, failing to protect the rights of detainees and actively hiding evidence of abuse, a Minnesota bioethicist charges in today's issue of the journal Lancet. Some even went so far as to revive prisoners for further torture and falsify death certificates of prisoners killed during interrogation, according to official documents examined by Steven H. Miles of the University of Minnesota.
EXPLORE
Staff reports | August 22, 2012
Baltimore County's Office of the Chief Medical Examiner has ruled the January death of a 91-year-old woman from Cockeysville a homicide - and as a result, her daughter has been indicted for manslaughter. Police said that on Jan. 17, at 3:33 p.m., county medical personnel were dispatched to the 1000 block of Hidden Moss Drive, and found Audrey Caslow, 91, in a bathroom. Medical personnel determined that she had been there for two days, according to a press released from police. She lived at the home with her daughter, Sharon Caslow.
NEWS
June 1, 1991
The deaths of two dentists who worked on Maryland penitentiary system inmates brought to the front burner two questions that have simmered in the background of public debate on AIDS: What to do about a prison population believed to have as many as 10 percent of its members infected with the human immunodeficiency virus; and what to do about health-care workers suffering from AIDS.No one knows exactly how many inmates are infected. Corrections officials have resisted testing all inmates, fearing the costs to be incurred in treating large numbers of infected inmates.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2013
The shooting of Kendra Diggs and the subsequent barricade by her alleged attacker presented a challenge Tuesday for police and emergency responders. Under the threat of further gunfire from the off-duty Baltimore police officer, officials said, they were unable to render medical aid to the dying woman. "When you have a person who is down … what we're trained on is that you don't jeopardize six or seven police officers in your emotional reaction to save that person," Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts said in an interview Wednesday.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2013
A 17-year-old boy was shot in the back of the head inside a home in the Gwynn Oak area of Northwest Baltimore early on Wednesday morning, according to Baltimore Police. The teen, who has not been identified, was listed in critical condition at an area hospital on Wednesday, said Detective Angela Carter Watson, a police spokeswoman. Officers responded to a report of gunfire in the 4000 block of Eldorado Avenue, on the border between the city's Howard Park and Dorchester neighborhoods, just after midnight and located the injured teen inside a home.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2013
A man was shot in the leg in the 2700 block of The Alameda in Northeast Baltimore on Sunday evening, an incident that was not expected to be fatal, police said. Medical personnel responded and took the man to a local hospital, police said. The shooting happened after 7 p.m., police said. They had not identified a suspect or motive as of late Sunday. Anyone with information about the shooting may call Northeast District detectives at 410-396-2444. The incident followed two other nonfatal shootings Sunday in the city.
NEWS
Staff Reports | April 7, 2013
Baltimore Police say a man was stabbed to death early Sunday morning after apparently getting into an argument with two other people near the Inner Harbor. Police said the incident occurred at about 2:18 a.m. Sunday in the 200 block of East Pratt Street. The victim, identified by police as a 20-year-old black male, was leaving work when two individuals approached him and became engaged in an argument. The argument escalated and the victim was stabbed multiple times in the upper body, police said.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2013
The man who avoids paying his restaurant tab by faking a seizure is back in prison, according to the office of Baltimore City State's Attorney Gregg L. Bernstein. Andrew Palmer, 46, has been convicted more than four dozen times, Bernstein's office said, mostly for a unique spin on the classic dine-and-dash: Palmer would eat at a restaurant, then fake a seizure, be taken to a nearby hospital, only to be released when medical personnel found nothing wrong with him. Meanwhile, the restaurant would be stuck with an unpaid bill.
EXPLORE
Staff reports | August 22, 2012
Baltimore County's Office of the Chief Medical Examiner has ruled the January death of a 91-year-old woman from Cockeysville a homicide - and as a result, her daughter has been indicted for manslaughter. Police said that on Jan. 17, at 3:33 p.m., county medical personnel were dispatched to the 1000 block of Hidden Moss Drive, and found Audrey Caslow, 91, in a bathroom. Medical personnel determined that she had been there for two days, according to a press released from police. She lived at the home with her daughter, Sharon Caslow.
NEWS
November 30, 1993
The epidemic of violent youth crime is having an impact on all institutions, not least the hospitals and health clinics that are on the front lines of urban violence. In recent weeks, health and medical personnel from around the region have begun to voice alarm.Workers at emergency rooms, for example, have learned the clinical setting no longer automatically confers immunity from violence. Nurses in Washington, D.C., report cases of drive-by shooters who boldly stalk their victims through the hospital corridors to finish off the job if need be.Meanwhile, workers at a sexually transmitted disease clinic in Baltimore now hesitate to press clients to submit to routine physical examinations; they have learned that patients' reluctance to disrobe may mean they are carrying weapons.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson | May 20, 1991
The Maryland International Health Task Force headed for war-ravaged Kuwait yesterday on a weeklong mission to perform chores ranging from mending broken limbs and performing delicate surgery to advising officials on ways to rebuild hospitals.The task force -- including 40 high-level health care professionals, with specialists in emergency medicine, anesthesiologists, pediatricians, and plastic and orthopedic surgeons -- left Franklin Square Hospital about 1 p.m. amid festive bon voyage wishes from relatives, co-workers and Gov. William Donald Schaefer.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2011
Baltimore Running Festival organizers draped a finisher's medal on Bob Pohl's neck Thursday, nearly four weeks after he collapsed at the finish line of the half marathon and was saved by bystanders and medical personnel. Just before the end of the 13.1-mile race, Pohl, 55, suffered cardiac arrest, an uncommon condition among racers but one that is often deadly. Two runners have died in the 11-year history of the festival. "We had a lot of luck on our side," said Lee Corrigan, president of race organizers Corrigan Sport Enterprises, before handing over a medal for the half-marathon and another one for a race Pohl completed in Frederick.
NEWS
By Joe Burris | joseph.burris@baltsun.com | January 15, 2010
The USNS Comfort hospital ship will leave Canton Pier on Saturday morning for its biggest mission ever, taking a wide range of medical care to earthquake-ravaged Haiti. Military Sealift Command spokeswoman Laura Seal said the staff of more than 600 (including 560 medical personnel and 65 civil service mariners) will reach Haiti on Thursday for an open-ended mission. And the crew expects to encounter horrific conditions on the island. "When we go to casualty situations on a grand scale, we're going to see things like skull fractures, aneurysms and neurological issues," said Chad Singer, a hospital corpsman from New York.
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