Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMedical Necessity
IN THE NEWS

Medical Necessity

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2011
Delegates expressed support Friday for decriminalizing marijuana for medical patients, but said they would rewrite the legislation passed by the Senate. In a combined hearing of the House Government Operations and Judiciary committees, delegates pressed the Senate bill's sponsors — Republican Sen. David Brinkley and Democratic Sen. Jamie Raskin, both cancer survivors — on the practical implications of their proposal. The Senate voted 41-6 last month to make medical necessity a valid defense for possession of marijuana.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
The General Assembly is poised to pass legislation that would make Maryland the 19th state to legalize marijuana use for medical reasons - though how quickly the state's cancer patients and others might benefit remains in question. The state Senate gave the legislation preliminary approval Friday evening without debate. The bill, which has passed the House, would allow the legal distribution of marijuana by doctors and nurses through academic medical centers. A commission would be set up to spell out the terms under which it would be grown and dispensed.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 19, 2003
The Maryland House of Delegates approved a bill yesterday that would lessen the penalty for sick people found with marijuana if they can prove they possessed it for medical reasons. In a 73-62 vote, the House passed what is called a "defense bill." The measure doesn't make marijuana legal for those who say they need it, but it allows a judge to impose just a $100 fine if it is shown the drug is a medical necessity. "I am not for expanding drug rights," said Del. Gail H. Bates, a Howard County Republican, "but ... there are times when medications do not work.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2013
The General Assembly has passed a law that allows caregivers of patients who use medical marijuana to possess up to an ounce of pot without being convicted of a crime. "We are expressing our belief that people who are sick should be able to access the drug without civil or criminal penalties," said Sen. Jamie Raskin, a Montgomery County Democrat who introduced the bill. Patients are protected under a 2011 law that allows them to use medical necessity as an "affirmative defense" in court if caught with marijuana and drug paraphernalia.
NEWS
March 30, 2009
For patients suffering from cancer and other debilitating illnesses, the medical use of marijuana can relieve symptoms such as pain, inflammation and nausea in many cases. Currently, 13 states, including California, Colorado, Maine, Michigan, Rhode Island and Vermont, allow the medical use marijuana with a doctor's approval or certification. And although possession of the drug remains illegal under federal law, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder said last week that the Justice Department will no longer go after small dispensaries that sell cannabis for medical use so long as they comply with state laws.
NEWS
August 18, 2011
A panel that met Wednesday to explore whether Maryland should modify its marijuana laws may have come up with the most practical proposal yet to allow the medical use of marijuana by people suffering from chronic pain or illness, while discouraging the abuses that have plagued other states' efforts to legalize the drug. The plan, which involves giving schools and hospitals the lead role in administering the drug, appears to offer the best chance yet of passing both legal and medical muster.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2003
After a gripping debate in which senators described watching friends and family members die in pain, the Maryland Senate voted yesterday to reduce punishment for the very ill who use marijuana as medicine. The House of Delegates approved an identical bill two weeks ago, meaning the matter appears headed for Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s desk . Ehrlich said yesterday that he is leaning toward signing the bill, which would make Maryland the ninth state to offer some form of legal shelter to medical marijuana patients.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2003
Some health plans generate a lot more consumer complaints than others - and the Maryland Insurance Administration released yesterday its first-ever report comparing complaint rates for different insurers. Insurance Commissioner Steven B. Larsen said the report was designed to help consumers choose health plans, but his department might also use the data to examine the "market conduct" of insurers with high rates of complaints. The report divides complaints into two categories: disputes over whether a given service is medically necessary (if it isn't, the insurer doesn't have to pay)
NEWS
March 30, 2011
So the new legislation "that would allow those caught with small amounts of marijuana to avoid punishment altogether if they can convince a judge that they used the drug out of medical necessity" is supposed to be a "middle ground on marijuana?" Get real. This is yet another excuse to put off what should have been done long ago: legalization, not just for medicinal use, but for all citizens. The fact of the matter is that marijuana is safer than alcohol or tobacco, yet its use can cause one to lose their job, be expelled from schools and universities, and even land in jail.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2011
The polio survivor says he thinks about arrest "all the time. " The Air Force veteran with multiple sclerosis lives in "constant fear" of being handcuffed and taken away from her family. The crime victim who has suffered seizures and migraine headaches since being assaulted with a crowbar was recently put on probation for 18 months, leaving her feeling like "a wanted criminal in her home state. " All are ingesting marijuana to ease their symptoms — and looking to the General Assembly to make such use legal.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley likely would veto any legislation to legalize medical marijuana because of concerns over whether it would stand up to federal scrutiny, his spokeswoman said Thursday. His decision comes as states with programs similar to what Maryland is considering have come under fire from federal prosecutors and were forced to suspend all or parts of their programs. His decision could once again kill an effort that has stalled in the General Assembly for years. Maryland legislators are to begin debating three medical marijuana bills in House of Delegates committee hearings today.
NEWS
August 18, 2011
A panel that met Wednesday to explore whether Maryland should modify its marijuana laws may have come up with the most practical proposal yet to allow the medical use of marijuana by people suffering from chronic pain or illness, while discouraging the abuses that have plagued other states' efforts to legalize the drug. The plan, which involves giving schools and hospitals the lead role in administering the drug, appears to offer the best chance yet of passing both legal and medical muster.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2011
Delegates expressed support Friday for decriminalizing marijuana for medical patients, but said they would rewrite the legislation passed by the Senate. In a combined hearing of the House Government Operations and Judiciary committees, delegates pressed the Senate bill's sponsors — Republican Sen. David Brinkley and Democratic Sen. Jamie Raskin, both cancer survivors — on the practical implications of their proposal. The Senate voted 41-6 last month to make medical necessity a valid defense for possession of marijuana.
NEWS
March 30, 2011
So the new legislation "that would allow those caught with small amounts of marijuana to avoid punishment altogether if they can convince a judge that they used the drug out of medical necessity" is supposed to be a "middle ground on marijuana?" Get real. This is yet another excuse to put off what should have been done long ago: legalization, not just for medicinal use, but for all citizens. The fact of the matter is that marijuana is safer than alcohol or tobacco, yet its use can cause one to lose their job, be expelled from schools and universities, and even land in jail.
NEWS
March 28, 2011
Legislation that would allow those caught with small amounts of marijuana to avoid punishment altogether if they can convince a judge that they used the drug out of medical necessity would still leave state law on the matter an inconsistent jumble. But given the reasonable concerns state Health Secretary Joshua Sharfstein raised about Maryland's ability to enact a more comprehensive bill sponsored this year by Del. Dan Morhaim and others, the legislation, which passed the state Senate, represents a reasonable middle step and deserves to be enacted by the House of Delegates.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2011
The polio survivor says he thinks about arrest "all the time. " The Air Force veteran with multiple sclerosis lives in "constant fear" of being handcuffed and taken away from her family. The crime victim who has suffered seizures and migraine headaches since being assaulted with a crowbar was recently put on probation for 18 months, leaving her feeling like "a wanted criminal in her home state. " All are ingesting marijuana to ease their symptoms — and looking to the General Assembly to make such use legal.
NEWS
By Thomas Healy and Thomas Healy,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 29, 2001
WASHINGTON - The debate over the medical use of marijuana made its way to the Supreme Court yesterday as lawyers squared off over a California law that lets seriously ill patients use the drug for therapy and pain relief after other remedies have failed. A lawyer for the federal government argued that the California measure, which voters approved in 1996, conflicts with federal drug laws. Those laws ban the use or distribution of marijuana and make no exceptions for medical purposes. But a lawyer for an Oakland "cannabis club" that seeks to sell marijuana to patients disagreed.
NEWS
February 28, 2011
Maryland's current law on medical marijuana doesn't make a lot of sense. Rather than outlawing it completely or, as several states have now done, creating a controlled system allowing those with certain medical conditions access to the drug, Maryland has taken the approach of keeping marijuana illegal but allowing those caught with small amounts of it to claim medical necessity as a defense. If the judge buys it, the penalty drops to a $100 fine. While this system has the virtue of simplicity — no thorny questions for legislators and regulators about what diseases qualify as medical necessity, no licensing of growers or dispensers — it forces patients to buy drugs illegally and leaves the state with no real idea of how many of them are using the drug and to what effect.
NEWS
February 28, 2011
Maryland's current law on medical marijuana doesn't make a lot of sense. Rather than outlawing it completely or, as several states have now done, creating a controlled system allowing those with certain medical conditions access to the drug, Maryland has taken the approach of keeping marijuana illegal but allowing those caught with small amounts of it to claim medical necessity as a defense. If the judge buys it, the penalty drops to a $100 fine. While this system has the virtue of simplicity — no thorny questions for legislators and regulators about what diseases qualify as medical necessity, no licensing of growers or dispensers — it forces patients to buy drugs illegally and leaves the state with no real idea of how many of them are using the drug and to what effect.
NEWS
February 1, 2010
E veryone has heard the horror stories from California, which after passing a 1996 law legalizing the medical use of marijuana for patients with cancer and other serious illnesses found itself awash in pot shops and physicians who seemed all too eager to hand out cannabis prescriptions to anyone who asked, regardless of the complaint. California is belatedly moving to correct the worst abuses of that law, but the sheer number of loosely regulated pot dispensaries and pharmacies that sprang up after its passage is making reform an uphill struggle.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.