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Medical Malpractice

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By JAMES J. KILPATRICK | February 4, 1993
Charleston, South Carolina. -- Everyone knows about the damages that juries award for medical malpractice.Everyone knows that juries really wallop defendant doctors.Everyone knows that a typical verdict is for millions of dollars.Maybe we ought to look again at what everyone knows. A study conducted under the auspices of the Duke University Law School questions the conventional wisdom. It turns out that at least in North Carolina, the situation is not exactly what everyone knows.The study, recently reported in Judicature magazine, was undertaken in this fashion.
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NEWS
October 2, 2014
Sexual abuse by a doctor is medical malpractice. The abuse took place while Dr. Nikita Levy was an employee of Johns Hopkins, working at a Johns Hopkins facility, where he was not adequately supervised ( "Why is Hopkins liable in the Levy case?" Sept. 30). For example, he performed thousands of pelvic exams with no chaperon present - a violation of standard medical practice. Did his staff not notice? The women's claims were not handled as individual malpractice lawsuits but as a class action, which saved the hospital years of costly litigation and embarrassment.
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NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Sun Staff Writer | May 28, 1994
Marvin Ellin, one of Baltimore's most visible medical malpractice lawyers, finds himself on the other end of a malpractice lawsuit in Baltimore County Circuit Court.The civil suit against Mr. Ellin was filed by the husband and four children of Cherie M. Bishop, 53, of Middle River, who died 24 hours after entering a Delaware hospital in June 1986.The family accuses Mr. Ellin of legal malpractice for not filing a claim against the hospital within Delaware's two-year time limit.In pretrial rulings Monday, Judge Thomas J. Bollinger said the jury first must decide whether the family has a valid claim for medical malpractice against the hospital.
HEALTH
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
A Baltimore County judge declared a mistrial Wednesday in the latest malpractice case against former cardiologist Mark Midei and the former owners of St. Joseph Medical Center after jurors failed to agree on how much the plaintiff deserved in damages. The decision came after four days of tense deliberation among jurors who listened to six weeks of proceedings in the case. Baltimore developer Glenn Weinberg alleged that he scaled back his career and lost millions of dollars after the cardiologist wrongly led him to believe that he suffered from severe coronary artery disease and placed unnecessary stents in his heart.
NEWS
March 15, 2005
The state Senate passed a bill last night that would implement a fund to hold down doctors' insurance rates and set limits on malpractice lawsuits. The bill, which passed, 42-4, and moves to the House, cleans up technical problems in a medical malpractice reform compromise bill the General Assembly passed over Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s objections in a special legislative session in December. Supporters say the bill is needed for the state to begin payments in an effort to hold increases in doctors' malpractice insurance to 5 percent a year.
NEWS
July 7, 2007
John Francis King Sr., a retired Baltimore medical malpractice defense lawyer, died Wednesday of Alzheimer's disease at College Manor nursing home in Lutherville. The former Federal Hill and Ruxton resident was 82. Mr. King was born and raised in Waynesboro, Pa., and graduated in 1943 from Mercersburg Academy. He served as a signalman in the Navy in the Atlantic from 1943 until 1945. After the war, he earned his bachelor's degree from Dickinson College and his law degree in 1950 from Georgetown University.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 25, 1998
LOS ANGELES -- William H. Ginsburg's specialty is medical malpractice, not criminal defense, and he became Monica Lewinsky's lawyer because of old family friendship, not professional expertise. But he is no stranger to high-profile cases and tense depositions."People who feel obliged to share everything they know in answer to a question really are poor witnesses," Ginsburg wrote in a 1990 article, "Preparing Depositions," for a legal publication called For the Defense."A technique sometimes used by plaintiffs' lawyers to attempt to prod a witness to volunteer information is the 'pregnant pause,' " Ginsburg wrote.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1997
Attorneys in a Howard County courtroom are battling over a question that medical and educational professionals wrestle with: how best to rear a mentally impaired child.The issue is central to a medical malpractice lawsuit filed by the Hagerstown parents of a 3-year-old child with Down syndrome who are asking that a doctor and a Columbia medical practice pay the costs of raising the boy. Joyce and Dan Shull, former Savage residents, allege they were never told she faced a high risk of having a child with the genetic defect and would have aborted the fetus had they known.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and Andrew A. Green and David Nitkin and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | January 18, 2005
LAWMAKERS say the governor offered all kinds of goodies in a last-minute (and nearly successful) lobbying effort to persuade members of the House of Delegates to sustain his veto of a medical malpractice bill last week. Del. Samuel I. Rosenberg, a Baltimore Democrat, chronicled the effort in a diary he keeps and distributes electronically. "Lots of gossip, hearsay, and even statements by the people involved about how the Governor will reward his friends and do otherwise unto his enemies in the wake of the medical malpractice override," Rosenberg wrote.
NEWS
By JENNIFER SKALKA and JENNIFER SKALKA,SUN REPORTER | January 20, 2006
For the fourth consecutive year, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. will introduce a slots proposal, this time as part of his 20-point legislative package, which includes a military retirement tax credit, medical malpractice legislation and a witness-intimidation bill, aides said yesterday. Although another defeat of slot machines, the governor's solution to school construction needs, could prove a liability in November's elections, Ehrlich is pushing for a plan anyway, saying competition from neighboring states, notably Pennsylvania, that have legalized slots would cost the state money.
NEWS
July 13, 2013
Regarding your recent article on medical malpractice, even medical students circa 1988 knew that the labor-inducing drug Pitocin is to be given slowly and intravenously and that you don't push the baby out with your hand ("Court overturns judgment against Johns Hopkins in malpractice case," July 11). Humans are evolving with greater access to obstetricians, and devolving by thinking they should use midwives instead. Access to midwives alone is like losing a healthy child trying to deliver at the Superdome during Hurricane Katrina.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2013
Two former patients of Johns Hopkins gynecologist Dr. Nikita Levy filed lawsuits against him and his former employer Friday over concerns that he might have secretly photographed them, as a victims advocacy group joined lawyers in pressing for more information from an ongoing criminal inquiry. Together, the complaints seek tens of millions of dollars in damages from Levy and Hopkins, with charges including negligence, invasion of privacy and intentional infliction of emotional distress.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | December 28, 2012
U.S surgeons leave a foreign object in a patient at least 39 times a week. They perform the wrong procedure on a patient at least 20 times a week. And they operate on the wrong body part at least 20 times a week. That is what Johns Hopkins researchers found when they analyzed malpractice claims between 1990 and 2010. The researchers conservatively estimate that 80,000 such preventable, surgical mistakes - which the medical profession defines as those that should never occur - happened in that 20-year time period.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2012
Services will be held at 6:30 p.m. Friday at the Grand Masonic Lodge, 304 International Circle, Cockeysville, for Stephen J. Hughes, 57, a former economist and founding partner of the Towson law firm of Treanor Pope and Hughes, who died June 4. Mr. Hughes, a longtime Ten Hills resident, was killed in an automobile accident near Oxford, England, that also claimed the lives of his two sons-in-law. Mr. Hughes had traveled to England with his daughter, Angela Hughes Brooks, 37, a technical editor and writer, and her husband, Gregory Brooks, 39, a Catonsville graphic designer.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2012
For the second time this summer, a local family has been awarded a huge sum of money by a Baltimore jury after claiming that negligent care by a local hospital caused their child to be born with a disability. A jury Tuesday awarded $21 million to a Glen Burnie couple whose son was born prematurely with cerebral palsy at Harbor Hospital in 2002, and is now, at age 9, "literally trapped inside his body" with a fully functioning mind but a severely disabled body, according to a family attorney.
NEWS
By Cedric Dark | April 26, 2012
With Mitt Romney essentially assured the Republican nomination for president, the time has arrived to compare his (supposedly) differing viewpoints on health reform with President Barack Obama's. As many commentators and policy analysts have recognized, Mr. Romney's Massachusetts health reform law served as the prototype for the federal law derided by Republicans (and now praised by Democrats) as Obamacare. The core of the Affordable Care Act - an individual mandate, guaranteed issuance of insurance, and public health insurance expansion - derived from Governor Romney's achievements.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 17, 2003
SCRANTON, Pa. - Plunging into a fractious debate over health care, President Bush called forcefully yesterday for a new law to limit the amount of money that juries can award people who sue doctors or hospitals for medical malpractice. Speaking after a visit to a hospital here, Bush complained that "frivolous and junk lawsuits" were driving up the cost of liability insurance for doctors. As a result, he said, many Americans have suffered as their doctors have had to move or close their practices.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2011
Maryland's highest court ruled Thursday in favor of an Orthodox Jewish plaintiff who missed part of a medical malpractice trial because it was scheduled during a two-day Jewish holiday. He will now be a allowed a retrial in the case. The Maryland Court of Appeals ruled that the trial court "abused its discretion by denying plaintiff's motions to suspend trial for two days," according to the opinion issued this week. The top court's narrow ruling says that excluding Alexander Neustadter from his own trial was prejudicial.
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