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HEALTH
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2011
It took 25 years for Dr. Mark Midei to build his reputation and less than two for it to come crashing down. In the spring of 2009, he was a superstar cardiologist with a seven-figure salary and a staff that adored him. By late April 2011, he was disgraced, depressed, in a rehab facility, and so financially strapped he would soon have to put his sprawling home up for sale. "I've been near suicidal at times, my whole identity was stripped from me," Midei said last week in an exclusive meeting with The Baltimore Sun. It was his first extended interview since inquiries into whether he performed unnecessary medical procedures - the placement of coronary stents - were initiated by federal investigators and his employer in May 2009.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Former Catonsville doctor William Dando will not face trial for sexual assault allegations after agreeing never to practice medicine in Maryland again. Allegany County prosecutors dropped charges against him Tuesday, citing two factors — the "he said, she said" nature of the case and his decision to surrender his medical license. Dando had been scheduled to stand trial Wednesday in an incident in which a 41-year-old patient said he touched her genitals while treating her for an ear infection at an urgent-care center near Cumberland.
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HEALTH
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2012
Attorneys for Dr. Mark Midei argued before a Baltimore Circuit Court judge Monday that the embattled cardiologist should get his medical license back, claiming the Board of Physicians stripped it from him last year after erroneously finding that Midei falsified patient records to justify the placement of unnecessary coronary stents. The judge gave no timeline for her decision. Midei, who is being sued by more than 200 former patients of St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson, said after the hearing that he was "optimistic.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
The Maryland Board of Physicians upheld on Thursday its decision to suspend Dr. William Dando's medical license based on his indictment in Allegany County for an alleged sexual assault. Dando appeared before the board Wednesday and was given the chance to argue why the suspension, issued June 5, should be lifted. A presentation from Dando and his lawyer did not dissuade the board that "there exists a substantial risk of serious harm to the public health, safety or welfare in Dr. Dando's continued practice," acting board Executive Director Christine Farrelly wrote in a letter posted to the board website Thursday.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
A Baltimore County judge denied Mark Midei's appeal for reinstatement of his medical license, ruling that there was "substantial evidence" for the Maryland Board of Physicians to revoke it last year after finding that the Towson cardiologist falsified patient records to justify the placement of unnecessary coronary stents. The decision ends an ordeal that began more than three years ago, when an anonymous letter was sent to the state board, claiming Midei, a well-regarded physician who earned a seven-figure salary at St. Joseph Medical Center, was improperly treating patients.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
Towson gynecologist Dr. John Yacoub surrendered his medical license to state regulators Wednesday as he faced allegations of improperly distributing prescription drugs. He was not accused of wrongdoing related to images of patients' genitals found on his phone. The action ends a Maryland Board of Physicians investigation into Yacoub, though he still could face criminal charges. "He is taking time now to work through personal matters," said his lawyer, Melanie Glickson, who spoke on his behalf.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff Writer | November 20, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- An Annapolis gynecologist who was a partner in a well-known downtown practice surrendered his medical license yesterday amid allegations of having sexual relations with five patients.Dr. Jeffrey A. Briggs, a 39-year-old physician who worked with Annapolis OB-GYN Associates, gave up his license after Maryland's medical disciplinary board investigated charges that he was having affairs with patients. He admitted to "sexual misconduct."One former patient, a young woman from Annapolis, accused him of impregnating her and then arranging for an abortion.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Sue Miller and Frank D. Roylance and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | October 31, 1991
State officials have summarily suspended the medical license of a Baltimore psychiatrist on charges of improperly prescribing addictive pain killers, tranquilizers and sleeping pills in treating drug addicts.In a separate case, a psychiatrist from Catonsville was placed on three years' probation for prescribing narcotics in a manner "clearly outside the accepted standard of care."The state Board of Physician Quality Assurance found that Dr. Else M. Hillgard, 65, of the 100 block of W. Read St., Baltimore, posed "a grave risk and an imminent danger to the public health, safety and welfare."
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Former Catonsville doctor William Dando will not face trial for sexual assault allegations after agreeing never to practice medicine in Maryland again. Allegany County prosecutors dropped charges against him Tuesday, citing two factors — the "he said, she said" nature of the case and his decision to surrender his medical license. Dando had been scheduled to stand trial Wednesday in an incident in which a 41-year-old patient said he touched her genitals while treating her for an ear infection at an urgent-care center near Cumberland.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | February 4, 1999
Pietr Hitzig, Baltimore's Internet diet doctor, has surrendered his license to practice medicine to state authorities, agreeing never to seek reinstatement in Maryland and admitting that he engaged in sexual misconduct with patients.Hitzig's license was accepted yesterday by Maryland's Board of Physician Quality Assurance, which described the Harvard-educated doctor's conduct as among the worst it had investigated.Maryland's physician board, which brought the claims against Hitzig, suspended his license Dec. 16 and had scheduled a seven-day hearing this month to decide whether to revoke it. Hitzig is under federal investigation of allegations he practiced medicine through the Internet.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
Dr. William Dando pleaded not guilty and is requesting a jury trial on charges he sexually assaulted a female patient at an urgent care center near Cumberland, according to court records updated Monday. Dando appeared Tuesday in Allegany County Circuit Court and his trial is scheduled for Sept. 13. Neither he nor his attorney, R. Steven Friend of Cumberland, could be reached for comment. Dando was indicted last month on sex offense charges after a 41-year-old woman told police he inappropriately touched her during an unchaperoned pelvic examination at MedExpress Urgent Care Center in LaVale in April.
NEWS
June 6, 2014
There's good reason nursery schools don't hire convicted child molesters as teachers and banks won't consider people found guilty of embezzlement for positions as tellers. The explanation is simple: Certain jobs - including nurses, therapists, social workers and so on - can only be safely filled by people of demonstrably good character because society has such a huge stake in ensuring they carry out their duties in a way that protects both their employers and the public they serve. That's why teachers and tellers are routinely required to undergo a criminal background check before they can start work.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2014
State health officials launched an investigation Thursday into how Dr. William Dando was allowed to practice medicine in Maryland, given his 1987 rape conviction in Florida, and they suspended his medical license because of a sexual assault indictment filed last month in Allegany County. The officials disclosed that when Dando applied for a Maryland medical license in 1996, he told the Board of Physicians he had "assaulted someone" while under the influence of alcohol in the past, but did not specify that the 1986 incident involved rape at gunpoint.
HEALTH
Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
To become licensed as a nurse, a social worker or even to drive around dead bodies in Maryland, a criminal background check is required. But not to get a doctor's license. Instead, the state Board of Physicians asks would-be doctors to voluntarily disclose arrests and convictions. That could change as soon as next year. Already considering a background check policy, the board may move more urgently following news that it granted a medical license to a doctor with a previous rape conviction who now has been charged with sexually assaulting a patient in Allegany County.
HEALTH
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2013
Three years after touting his medical background as he campaigned for Congress, Rep. Andy Harris is emerging as a top spokesman in opposition to Obamacare - and taking on other health policy issues as well. For Harris, a Baltimore County anesthesiologist who occasionally wore scrubs as he ran for office in 2010, the troubled rollout of the health care law is providing a platform just as he has expanded his reach on other medical issues - from human cloning to organ transplants for HIV patients.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
Towson gynecologist Dr. John Yacoub surrendered his medical license to state regulators Wednesday as he faced allegations of improperly distributing prescription drugs. He was not accused of wrongdoing related to images of patients' genitals found on his phone. The action ends a Maryland Board of Physicians investigation into Yacoub, though he still could face criminal charges. "He is taking time now to work through personal matters," said his lawyer, Melanie Glickson, who spoke on his behalf.
HEALTH
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
Two years after a Maryland doctor lost his medical license for using a controversial treatment for autistic patients, the state Board of Physicians has suspended his business partner for allegedly writing the same dangerous prescription for several patients. The board suspended John L. Young's license to practice medicine in the state Feb. 13. On Feb. 21, Young resigned from his post on the University System of Maryland's Board of Regents, citing a desire to "devote more time to other activities.
NEWS
June 6, 2014
There's good reason nursery schools don't hire convicted child molesters as teachers and banks won't consider people found guilty of embezzlement for positions as tellers. The explanation is simple: Certain jobs - including nurses, therapists, social workers and so on - can only be safely filled by people of demonstrably good character because society has such a huge stake in ensuring they carry out their duties in a way that protects both their employers and the public they serve. That's why teachers and tellers are routinely required to undergo a criminal background check before they can start work.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2013
Lawyers for Baltimore businessman Glenn Weinberg told a jury Friday he missed out on making millions of dollars from the Maryland Live casino when he retired early after being wrongly told he had severely blocked heart arteries. But attorneys for former St. Joseph Medical Center cardiologist Mark Midei said Weinberg quit working at the Cordish Co. development firm because he didn't like his job and would not have been guaranteed a big payout from the Cordish-owned casino even if he had stayed.
HEALTH
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2013
Attorneys for former star cardiologist Mark Midei tried — and failed — to argue for a mistrial during opening statements Friday in a medical malpractice trial, the latest in a string of cases accusing the doctor of placing unnecessary stents in heart patients. Plaintiff Glenn Weinberg, a prominent Baltimore businessman, contends that he lost at least $50 million after scaling back his career because Midei falsely led him to believe that he had serious coronary artery disease to justify expensive medical intervention.
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