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By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2011
As an oil painter in college, Elizabeth Cook expected to pursue the life of the typical aspiring American artist: get an advanced degree, move to a big city, embark on a future of creative struggle. Then she attended an exclusive arts workshop in New York. "Here I was, right in the center of the contemporary art world, and I saw that in addition to talent, you had to have a big ego and be comfortable selling yourself," says Cook, a Louisiana native and a 2008 summa cum laude graduate of Louisiana State University.
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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2013
Barbara "Babs" Piper, a former administrative assistant at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, died Wednesday of complications from acute bipolar disorder at her Rodgers Forge home. She was 63. Born Barbara Ann Jensen in Baltimore, she was the daughter of William Jensen, who owned an East Baltimore hardware store, and Ann Trabert Jensen, a homemaker. She attended the old St. Bernard's Parochial School in Waverly and was a 1967 graduate of Eastern High School. She earned bachelor's and master's degrees at Hopkins and an associate's degree in managerial science from its School of Continuing Studies.
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By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2012
She enters the clinic on a walker, slow yet remarkably steady, and as Pauline Wood hails her host for the day, she gives him a bag of lemon tarts she rose early that morning to bake.  With her white hair and glasses, Wood, 89, is every inch the lovable but tough grandmother, complete with her love of puppies, her passion for raising heirloom tomatoes and her predilection for waving away offers of help with the words, "Oh my goodness, I ...
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By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2012
She enters the clinic on a walker, slow yet remarkably steady, and as Pauline Wood hails her host for the day, she gives him a bag of lemon tarts she rose early that morning to bake.  With her white hair and glasses, Wood, 89, is every inch the lovable but tough grandmother, complete with her love of puppies, her passion for raising heirloom tomatoes and her predilection for waving away offers of help with the words, "Oh my goodness, I ...
NEWS
February 11, 2002
Thomas M. Stevenson Jr., 79, medical illustrator Thomas M. Stevenson Jr., a retired medical illustrator and history enthusiast, died Friday at his Parkville home after a long illness. He was 79. Mr. Stevenson retired as director of the department of illustrative services at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in 1983. He illustrated several medical textbooks, journal articles and technical exhibits. He created technical drawings of a hyperbaric operating chamber designed by Dr. R Adams Cowley of the University of Maryland, and his illustrations of cardiopulmonary resuscitation were published by the American Heart Association.
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By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | December 16, 1999
Leon Schlossberg, a Johns Hopkins University professor known internationally as a medical illustrator and the creator of "Mr. Bones," died Tuesday of colon cancer at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. The longtime Northwest Baltimore resident was 87."One of his strengths and his loves was living anatomy," said Gary P. Lees, chairman of the Department of Art as Applied to Medicine, where Mr. Schlossberg worked for nearly all his career.Mr. Schlossberg's most famous work, The Johns Hopkins Atlas of Human Functional Anatomy -- an all-time best seller for the Johns Hopkins University Press -- is entering a fifth printing and has been translated into 11 languages.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2011
Elinor W. Bodian, who worked as a medical illustrator at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine for 40 years and was also an abstract painter, died Sept. 16 of heart disease at her Roland Park Place home. She was 90. The daughter of a mechanical engineer and a quality-control manager, she was born Elinor Widmont and raised on her family's farm in Dayton, Ohio. After graduating from Fairview High School in 1939, she began her nursing studies at the University of Cincinnati College of Nursing.
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By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | February 25, 2007
Ranice W. Crosby, an accomplished medical illustrator and the first woman to be a department head at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, died in her sleep on Feb. 18 at Keswick Multi-Care Center in Baltimore. She was 91. The daughter of a salesman and a bookkeeper, Ranice W. Birch was born in Regina, Saskatchewan. Upon completing high school in Providence, R.I., she attended the Connecticut College for Women, graduating in 1937. She took a job at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in 1937 and began her studies in medical illustration under the department's first director, Max Brodel.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2013
Barbara "Babs" Piper, a former administrative assistant at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, died Wednesday of complications from acute bipolar disorder at her Rodgers Forge home. She was 63. Born Barbara Ann Jensen in Baltimore, she was the daughter of William Jensen, who owned an East Baltimore hardware store, and Ann Trabert Jensen, a homemaker. She attended the old St. Bernard's Parochial School in Waverly and was a 1967 graduate of Eastern High School. She earned bachelor's and master's degrees at Hopkins and an associate's degree in managerial science from its School of Continuing Studies.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2004
The vibrant black, red and tan harlequin beetle somersaults chaotically in one painting. Nearby is a double self-portrait of artist Faith Gillum -- with the big bug resting on her cheek in one image. The unusual art exhibit also includes a pen-and-ink pointillism piece showing a harpy eagle's head, with skull partially exposed, that reflects 50 hours of work by artist Natalie Sigwart. The exhibit at McDaniel College, Uncovering Biology Through Art, features the work of these artists and Katherine Yi, who focused on face painting in cultures throughout the world.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2011
Elinor W. Bodian, who worked as a medical illustrator at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine for 40 years and was also an abstract painter, died Sept. 16 of heart disease at her Roland Park Place home. She was 90. The daughter of a mechanical engineer and a quality-control manager, she was born Elinor Widmont and raised on her family's farm in Dayton, Ohio. After graduating from Fairview High School in 1939, she began her nursing studies at the University of Cincinnati College of Nursing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2011
As an oil painter in college, Elizabeth Cook expected to pursue the life of the typical aspiring American artist: get an advanced degree, move to a big city, embark on a future of creative struggle. Then she attended an exclusive arts workshop in New York. "Here I was, right in the center of the contemporary art world, and I saw that in addition to talent, you had to have a big ego and be comfortable selling yourself," says Cook, a Louisiana native and a 2008 summa cum laude graduate of Louisiana State University.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | February 25, 2007
Ranice W. Crosby, an accomplished medical illustrator and the first woman to be a department head at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, died in her sleep on Feb. 18 at Keswick Multi-Care Center in Baltimore. She was 91. The daughter of a salesman and a bookkeeper, Ranice W. Birch was born in Regina, Saskatchewan. Upon completing high school in Providence, R.I., she attended the Connecticut College for Women, graduating in 1937. She took a job at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in 1937 and began her studies in medical illustration under the department's first director, Max Brodel.
NEWS
February 11, 2002
Thomas M. Stevenson Jr., 79, medical illustrator Thomas M. Stevenson Jr., a retired medical illustrator and history enthusiast, died Friday at his Parkville home after a long illness. He was 79. Mr. Stevenson retired as director of the department of illustrative services at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in 1983. He illustrated several medical textbooks, journal articles and technical exhibits. He created technical drawings of a hyperbaric operating chamber designed by Dr. R Adams Cowley of the University of Maryland, and his illustrations of cardiopulmonary resuscitation were published by the American Heart Association.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | December 16, 1999
Leon Schlossberg, a Johns Hopkins University professor known internationally as a medical illustrator and the creator of "Mr. Bones," died Tuesday of colon cancer at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. The longtime Northwest Baltimore resident was 87."One of his strengths and his loves was living anatomy," said Gary P. Lees, chairman of the Department of Art as Applied to Medicine, where Mr. Schlossberg worked for nearly all his career.Mr. Schlossberg's most famous work, The Johns Hopkins Atlas of Human Functional Anatomy -- an all-time best seller for the Johns Hopkins University Press -- is entering a fifth printing and has been translated into 11 languages.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2004
The vibrant black, red and tan harlequin beetle somersaults chaotically in one painting. Nearby is a double self-portrait of artist Faith Gillum - with the big bug resting on her cheek in one image. The unusual art exhibit also includes a pen-and-ink pointillism piece showing a harpy eagle's head, with skull partially exposed, that reflects 50 hours of work by artist Natalie Sigwart. The exhibit at McDaniel College, Uncovering Biology Through Art, features the work of these artists and Katherine Yi, who focused on face-painting in cultures throughout the world.
NEWS
November 7, 2003
Betsy G. Bang, a renowned medical illustrator and translator of several books of Indian folk tales, died Oct. 31 at her home in Woods Hole, Mass., of complications from a fall. The former Guilford resident was 91. Betsy Garrett was born in Lancaster, N.C., and raised in Washington and attended public schools. She earned her bachelor's degree in 1933 from George Washington University. She moved to Baltimore and studied medical illustration at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine with Max Broedel, the world-renowned medical illustrator who was credited with bringing "art to medicine."
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