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NEWS
By ALICIA ROCKMORE AND SARAH WELCH and ALICIA ROCKMORE AND SARAH WELCH,MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE | July 21, 2006
How many times have you shown up for a doctor's appointment and been handed a stack of multicolored double-sided forms to fill out? You scan the information and realize that you don't remember when you had your tonsils out or the name of the medicine that caused you to break out in hives five years ago. Having complete and accurate records for everyone in your family isn't just a nice thing to have, it's essential. The good news is that getting them in order is a straightforward organizational task.
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TRAVEL
By Diane W. Stoneback, Tribune Newspapers | March 28, 2013
Mutter Museum may leave you shocked and horrified or amazed and fascinated. Either way, its collections of bones, bodies, body parts, plus tumors and other terrors, are unforgettable. The nation's finest and oldest medical museum - celebrating its 150th anniversary this month - bills itself as "disturbingly informative," and that is absolutely true. Specimens lining its wood-and-glass display cases reveal the effects of epidemics and diseases on the body, as well as an amazing array of human curiosities and anomalies.
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NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 17, 1996
Harold E. Hirsch, a Baltimore businessman who won a Silver Star for valor despite being seriously wounded during the Battle of Iwo Jima, died Jan. 26 of congestive heart failure in Plantation, Fla., where he and his wife were planning to retire. The Randallstown resident was 68.For the the past 15 years, Mr. Hirsch operated newsstands in the lobby of Mercantile Safe Deposit and Trust Co. and in the Court Square Building. He had sold the Mercantile stand this year.He came to Baltimore in 1950 after working in the family grocery business in Fairmont, W.Va.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2011
It was after 1 a.m. on June 5, 2010. Tyrone Brown had already had plenty to drink. But he wasn't ready to go home. The 32-year-old Baltimore native tried to drag his sister and a friend into Club Hippo, but they didn't want to go into a gay bar , according to a police account. He got touchy with some women standing outside, moving to hug one, and grabbing the butt of another. When she smacked him, he shoved her back. The woman's companion stepped in. As the confrontation escalated, the companion - off-duty Baltimore Police Officer Gahiji Tshamba - pulled his service weapon and unloaded it into Brown.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | June 11, 1993
Refusing to give your Social Security number to anyone other than the federal government and your employer is one way to safeguard your personal privacy, the American Civil Liberties Union's executive director told a group of business leaders yesterday."
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Sun Staff Writer | February 22, 1994
Your new doctor wants to review your medical history? You need proof of what your surgeon did to convince an insurance company to pay the bill? In today's marketplace, "you could spend $400 to $500 compiling a complete medical history to try to convince Blue Cross and Blue Shield to pay a bill," says Nicole Schultheis, an attorney who specializes in women's health issues.In the past few years, a new industry has moved into Maryland to copy medical records for hospitals. And as more and more people switch insurance companies and doctors, they are finding themselves with unexpected and large bills to move records.
NEWS
By Jennifer Sullivan and Jennifer Sullivan,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | February 26, 1999
Having carved his way through a lifetime of racial barriers, medical student Harold R. Johnson walked into Dr. Joseph Miller's office 43 years ago, seeking a surgical residency at the Fort Howard Veterans Administration Hospital."
NEWS
By Judy Foreman | September 23, 2005
A visit to the doctor these days is a sprint, not a marathon. With luck, you'll have about 22 minutes from start to finish, maybe a couple more if your doctor is a woman. You begin with a disadvantage - you're sitting down, half- naked, sick and scared. The doctor is vertical, dressed, presumably healthy, definitely the top dog. This event is winnable - but winning means finishing together, with a health plan you come up with jointly. To get the max from a minimal doctor visit, you have to screw up your nerve and ask, front and center, about the two or three things that worry you most, not the 20 other things you're vaguely concerned about.
NEWS
By Claire Panosian Dunavan | November 18, 2007
The young man in the hospital bed first cajoled, then narrowed his eyes to angry slits. No-way, no-how did he want certain details in his medical record. Finally, he threatened. He was a lawyer, he said, and the situation could get ugly. "You're a lawyer?" I thought in amazement as my eyes moved from his meaty, chiseled shoulder to the IV drip-drip-dripping antibiotics into his forearm. "You're a lawyer - and you use illegal steroids? Then browbeat doctors into deleting the fact from their notes?"
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2001
In testimony yesterday, a second prosecution expert said that the brain injuries that eventually caused 15-month-old Alexa Shearer's death in November 1999 were inflicted after the child had lunch - and less than an hour before a 911 call was made to police. "She became unconscious, and the injuries were inflicted within seconds of each other," Dr. Barbara Craig, director of the Armed Forces Center for Child Protection in Bethesda, said during the fifth day of testimony in the murder trial of North Laurel day care provider Kathleen A. Butcher.
NEWS
By Claire Panosian Dunavan | November 18, 2007
The young man in the hospital bed first cajoled, then narrowed his eyes to angry slits. No-way, no-how did he want certain details in his medical record. Finally, he threatened. He was a lawyer, he said, and the situation could get ugly. "You're a lawyer?" I thought in amazement as my eyes moved from his meaty, chiseled shoulder to the IV drip-drip-dripping antibiotics into his forearm. "You're a lawyer - and you use illegal steroids? Then browbeat doctors into deleting the fact from their notes?"
NEWS
By ALICIA ROCKMORE AND SARAH WELCH and ALICIA ROCKMORE AND SARAH WELCH,MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE | July 21, 2006
How many times have you shown up for a doctor's appointment and been handed a stack of multicolored double-sided forms to fill out? You scan the information and realize that you don't remember when you had your tonsils out or the name of the medicine that caused you to break out in hives five years ago. Having complete and accurate records for everyone in your family isn't just a nice thing to have, it's essential. The good news is that getting them in order is a straightforward organizational task.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman | September 23, 2005
A visit to the doctor these days is a sprint, not a marathon. With luck, you'll have about 22 minutes from start to finish, maybe a couple more if your doctor is a woman. You begin with a disadvantage - you're sitting down, half- naked, sick and scared. The doctor is vertical, dressed, presumably healthy, definitely the top dog. This event is winnable - but winning means finishing together, with a health plan you come up with jointly. To get the max from a minimal doctor visit, you have to screw up your nerve and ask, front and center, about the two or three things that worry you most, not the 20 other things you're vaguely concerned about.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2005
One was a distinguished Army surgeon, destined to go down in history as the man who solved one of medicine's most baffling and vexing mysteries. The other, a lesser-known clinician who'd studied in Baltimore, was a fearless medical adventurer who placed his own life on the line in the search for a cure. Together, just more than a century ago, Walter Reed and James Carroll helped rid the world of the yellow fever menace - but not before surviving a personal relationship that veered from mutual respect to jealousy and distrust before their time together was through.
NEWS
By Tony Pugh and Tony Pugh,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 12, 2004
Top U.S. health officials are asking families to use their Thanksgiving gatherings to discuss and record the medical histories of their parents, grandparents and other kin. Health researchers have known for years that family medical history is a strong indicator for many chronic diseases, including diabetes, stroke, obesity, cancer and heart disease. "In fact, family history is the most consistent risk factor for almost all human diseases across [one's] life span," said Muin Khoury, the director of the Office of Genomics and Disease Prevention at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2002
PORT ST. LUCIE, Fla. -- Orioles ace Scott Erickson proved he could be patient last year. Now, he wants to see results. Erickson, in his first competitive appearance since undergoing radical elbow surgery on Aug. 8, 2000, accomplished everything the team hoped he would in a three-inning appearance against the New York Mets yesterday at Thomas J. White Stadium. The only person who wasn't completely satisfied was Erickson, because he allowed two runs in his 49-pitch effort. "I expected to do a little better," Erickson said.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2005
One was a distinguished Army surgeon, destined to go down in history as the man who solved one of medicine's most baffling and vexing mysteries. The other, a lesser-known clinician who'd studied in Baltimore, was a fearless medical adventurer who placed his own life on the line in the search for a cure. Together, just more than a century ago, Walter Reed and James Carroll helped rid the world of the yellow fever menace - but not before surviving a personal relationship that veered from mutual respect to jealousy and distrust before their time together was through.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | June 7, 1993
Despite advances in the state of software, there are still some things I don't trust to my computer.For example, my accountant still does my income taxes. Somehow, I have the gut feeling that the software in his head is a lot better than anything I can buy off the shelf at Egghead for $44.95.So I was more than a little skeptical when I got a copy of Dr. Schueler's Home Medical Advisor. If I can't trust a computer to do my taxes, can I trust it to diagnose my aches and pains?The answer is that I'm not going to give up calling the doctor.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2001
In testimony yesterday, a second prosecution expert said that the brain injuries that eventually caused 15-month-old Alexa Shearer's death in November 1999 were inflicted after the child had lunch - and less than an hour before a 911 call was made to police. "She became unconscious, and the injuries were inflicted within seconds of each other," Dr. Barbara Craig, director of the Armed Forces Center for Child Protection in Bethesda, said during the fifth day of testimony in the murder trial of North Laurel day care provider Kathleen A. Butcher.
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