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By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,SUN REPORTER | July 24, 2008
Dr. Victor A. McKusick, a Johns Hopkins professor who pioneered the study of medical genetics and spent his career exploring how patients' genes predisposed them to medical disorders, died of cancer Tuesday at his home in Towson. He was 86. Often referred to as the "father of medical genetics," Dr. McKusick was widely credited with helping establish the scientific link between inheritance and disease. His meticulous research into rare genetic disorders - an intellectual pursuit he was discouraged from exploring as a young cardiologist - led to modern methods of classifying and treating inherited diseases.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2013
Margaret Hawkins Abbott, a retired Johns Hopkins Medical School genetics researcher who investigated families with inherited conditions for nearly five decades, died of dementia complications Feb. 1 at Keswick Multi-Care Center. She was 89 and lived in Ruxton. "She was a Johns Hopkins institution," said Dr. Jason Brandt, Johns Hopkins Medical School director of medical psychology and professor of psychiatry. "She dedicated her career to nursing and genetic diseases and to ferreting out family medical histories.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | January 26, 2007
Dr. Maimon M. Cohen, a leader in the development of medical genetics and first director of the Harvey Institute for Human Genetics at Greater Baltimore Medical Center, died of gastric cancer yesterday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Pikesville resident was 72. In 1997, Dr. Cohen joined GBMC as director of the genetics center that conducts research on adult diseases with genetic links, such as diabetes, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, some types of cancer and heart disease. "Dr. Maimon Cohen was an incredible leader and a wonderful human being.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,SUN REPORTER | July 24, 2008
Dr. Victor A. McKusick, a Johns Hopkins professor who pioneered the study of medical genetics and spent his career exploring how patients' genes predisposed them to medical disorders, died of cancer Tuesday at his home in Towson. He was 86. Often referred to as the "father of medical genetics," Dr. McKusick was widely credited with helping establish the scientific link between inheritance and disease. His meticulous research into rare genetic disorders - an intellectual pursuit he was discouraged from exploring as a young cardiologist - led to modern methods of classifying and treating inherited diseases.
FEATURES
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2000
Now that rival teams of scientists have created first drafts of the human genetic text, they are about to take the next step toward creating tomorrow's wonder drugs. It's called annotation, and it consists of poring through the volumes of DNA to find all the genes and figure out what they do. No one, perhaps, is more eager to start than Dr. Victor A. McKusick of Johns Hopkins University, 78, one of the founders of modern medical genetics. And few, perhaps, are better poised to influence what path the effort takes.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | July 29, 1992
BAR HARBOR, Maine -- Genetic material is surprisingly mobile, new research shows, a finding that offers new insights into many common inherited diseases and ways to cure them.The movable genetic material may also explain how evolution can sometimes occur at an explosive rate, and it underscores the fact that humans are still evolving, says Dr. Haig H. Kazazian Jr., director of Johns Hopkins University's Center for Medical Genetics."Such a roll of the genetic dice may not be so good for the individual, but it is great for the species," because it allows for greater diversity in evolutionary development, he reported at a genetics conference this week sponsored by Jackson Laboratory of Bar Harbor and Johns Hopkins.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN REPORTER | January 17, 2008
Dr. Victor A. McKusick, a Johns Hopkins professor widely considered the father of medical genetics, has been awarded the prestigious Japan Prize in Medical Genetics and Genomics and the $470,000 that goes with it. McKusick, one of the leading figures at the medical school, was recognized for more than a half-century of work deciphering and cataloging inherited disorders, and for laying the foundation for what became the Human Genome Project. "I'm terribly excited about it.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1997
The name of Dr. Anne B. McKusick, wife of Lasker Award winner Dr. Victor A. McKusick, was misstated in yesterday's editions.The Sun regrets the errors.Maybe it was discipline imposed by cold early mornings and the cows waiting impatiently in his father's dairy barn in Maine.Or maybe it is just genetic.In either case, Dr. Victor A. McKusick, 75, can't seem to retire or even slow down after a long career at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. That career has included the founding of Hopkins' Division of Medical Genetics, and quietly convincing the world that by cataloging human genes and the maladies they cause, doctors could discover the nature of the defect in the DNA molecule, and the means to correct it."
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Frank D. Roylance and Jonathan Bor and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1997
Also, Tuesday's article on the Lasker Awards omitted Dr. William B. Kouwenhoven from a list of past Johns Hopkins University recipients. Kouwenhoven won the Lasker Award in 1973.The Sun regrets the errors.Two leading scientists at the Johns Hopkins University will receive the coveted Albert Lasker Medical Research Awards this week -- Victor McKusick for his contributions to medical genetics and Alfred Sommer for his pioneering research into vitamin A.The annual awards are given to scientists, physicians and public servants who have made major inroads against the great killers and cripplers.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun reporter | May 2, 2008
WASHINGTON -- The House of Representatives passed legislation yesterday barring the use of genetic information in job and health insurance decisions, moving the government to the cusp of enacting the first federal law dealing with DNA-based medical care. "It really is the law catching up to science," said Rep. Judy Biggert, an Illinois Republican who helped lead the 13-year fight for the legislation. The House approved the measure 414-1, with Rep. Ron Paul, a Texas Republican, the lone dissenter.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun reporter | May 29, 2008
WASHINGTON - The government's leading geneticist announced yesterday that he is stepping down after 15 years, paving the way for the growing role that DNA will play in medical care. As director of the National Human Genome Research Institute, Dr. Francis S. Collins led the successful effort to sequence the human genome and helped secure a new law, signed just last week, barring discrimination based on genetic information. He also shepherded significant advances in understanding the genetic causes of common diseases, while attempting to reassure a public concerned about the ethical implications of the fast-moving developments.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun reporter | May 2, 2008
WASHINGTON -- The House of Representatives passed legislation yesterday barring the use of genetic information in job and health insurance decisions, moving the government to the cusp of enacting the first federal law dealing with DNA-based medical care. "It really is the law catching up to science," said Rep. Judy Biggert, an Illinois Republican who helped lead the 13-year fight for the legislation. The House approved the measure 414-1, with Rep. Ron Paul, a Texas Republican, the lone dissenter.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN REPORTER | January 17, 2008
Dr. Victor A. McKusick, a Johns Hopkins professor widely considered the father of medical genetics, has been awarded the prestigious Japan Prize in Medical Genetics and Genomics and the $470,000 that goes with it. McKusick, one of the leading figures at the medical school, was recognized for more than a half-century of work deciphering and cataloging inherited disorders, and for laying the foundation for what became the Human Genome Project. "I'm terribly excited about it.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | January 26, 2007
Dr. Maimon M. Cohen, a leader in the development of medical genetics and first director of the Harvey Institute for Human Genetics at Greater Baltimore Medical Center, died of gastric cancer yesterday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Pikesville resident was 72. In 1997, Dr. Cohen joined GBMC as director of the genetics center that conducts research on adult diseases with genetic links, such as diabetes, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, some types of cancer and heart disease. "Dr. Maimon Cohen was an incredible leader and a wonderful human being.
FEATURES
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2000
Now that rival teams of scientists have created first drafts of the human genetic text, they are about to take the next step toward creating tomorrow's wonder drugs. It's called annotation, and it consists of poring through the volumes of DNA to find all the genes and figure out what they do. No one, perhaps, is more eager to start than Dr. Victor A. McKusick of Johns Hopkins University, 78, one of the founders of modern medical genetics. And few, perhaps, are better poised to influence what path the effort takes.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1997
The name of Dr. Anne B. McKusick, wife of Lasker Award winner Dr. Victor A. McKusick, was misstated in yesterday's editions.The Sun regrets the errors.Maybe it was discipline imposed by cold early mornings and the cows waiting impatiently in his father's dairy barn in Maine.Or maybe it is just genetic.In either case, Dr. Victor A. McKusick, 75, can't seem to retire or even slow down after a long career at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. That career has included the founding of Hopkins' Division of Medical Genetics, and quietly convincing the world that by cataloging human genes and the maladies they cause, doctors could discover the nature of the defect in the DNA molecule, and the means to correct it."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2013
Margaret Hawkins Abbott, a retired Johns Hopkins Medical School genetics researcher who investigated families with inherited conditions for nearly five decades, died of dementia complications Feb. 1 at Keswick Multi-Care Center. She was 89 and lived in Ruxton. "She was a Johns Hopkins institution," said Dr. Jason Brandt, Johns Hopkins Medical School director of medical psychology and professor of psychiatry. "She dedicated her career to nursing and genetic diseases and to ferreting out family medical histories.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun reporter | May 29, 2008
WASHINGTON - The government's leading geneticist announced yesterday that he is stepping down after 15 years, paving the way for the growing role that DNA will play in medical care. As director of the National Human Genome Research Institute, Dr. Francis S. Collins led the successful effort to sequence the human genome and helped secure a new law, signed just last week, barring discrimination based on genetic information. He also shepherded significant advances in understanding the genetic causes of common diseases, while attempting to reassure a public concerned about the ethical implications of the fast-moving developments.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Frank D. Roylance and Jonathan Bor and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1997
Also, Tuesday's article on the Lasker Awards omitted Dr. William B. Kouwenhoven from a list of past Johns Hopkins University recipients. Kouwenhoven won the Lasker Award in 1973.The Sun regrets the errors.Two leading scientists at the Johns Hopkins University will receive the coveted Albert Lasker Medical Research Awards this week -- Victor McKusick for his contributions to medical genetics and Alfred Sommer for his pioneering research into vitamin A.The annual awards are given to scientists, physicians and public servants who have made major inroads against the great killers and cripplers.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | July 29, 1992
BAR HARBOR, Maine -- Genetic material is surprisingly mobile, new research shows, a finding that offers new insights into many common inherited diseases and ways to cure them.The movable genetic material may also explain how evolution can sometimes occur at an explosive rate, and it underscores the fact that humans are still evolving, says Dr. Haig H. Kazazian Jr., director of Johns Hopkins University's Center for Medical Genetics."Such a roll of the genetic dice may not be so good for the individual, but it is great for the species," because it allows for greater diversity in evolutionary development, he reported at a genetics conference this week sponsored by Jackson Laboratory of Bar Harbor and Johns Hopkins.
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