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NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun reporter | April 29, 2007
Two women whose bodies were found in a remote field in Harford County last year were the victims of homicide, the state medical examiner's office has determined. Jennifer Lynn Blankenship, 26, and Joyce Ann Toliver, 51, were among four women whose bodies were found in remote locations south of U.S. 40 between June and September last year, and investigators said at the time that they believed the deaths were linked to a common suspect. Last week, a 35-year-old laborer was convicted in the killing of Lillian Abramowicz Phelps, whose body was found June 14. Prosecutors said she may have been assaulted before Charles Eugene Burns ran her over with his Dodge Neon, puncturing her skull and leaving her blood on the bottom of the vehicle.
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NEWS
By GUS G. SENTEMENTES and GUS G. SENTEMENTES,Sun Reporter | November 10, 2006
A 39-year-old man shot by a Baltimore police officer earlier this year died last month, and the state medical examiner's office ruled yesterday that his death resulted from his shooting injuries, police said. William J. Burch, who lived in the 3100 block of Strickland St. in Southwest Baltimore, was shot Feb. 11 by an officer who went to the house because of a 911 hangup call, police said. Agent Donny Moses, a police spokesman, said officers found the front door open, went inside and discovered Burch in the kitchen with a steak knife.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN REPORTER | September 29, 2006
After almost three months of investigation, the Maryland Transportation Authority Police said yesterday that a Maryland Port Administration maintenance supervisor who died under suspicious circumstances was fatally injured in an accidental fall. The state medical examiner's office said the determination of the cause of death of Robert L. Benway Jr., 45, was delayed because two co-workers who were with him at the time of the June 26 incident initially gave a false account. Benway died of his injuries July 1. The medical examiner determined that the co-workers' revised explanation was consistent with the 21-year state employee's injuries.
NEWS
By GUS G. SENTEMENTES and GUS G. SENTEMENTES,SUN REPORTER | August 9, 2006
City police said yesterday that they arrested a suspect in connection with a man's killing 23 years ago after staking out a Southeast Baltimore neighborhood not far from where the killing occurred. Acting on information developed through sources, detectives staked out two houses in the Highlandtown neighborhood on Monday evening. Police said they spotted the man in the backyard of a rowhouse wearing only underwear. They spoke briefly with him at his front door, and then he shut the door and barricaded himself in the house for hours as police surrounded the home, police said.
NEWS
By GUS G. SENTEMENTES and GUS G. SENTEMENTES,SUN REPORTER | August 8, 2006
The circumstances of William N. Gibson's death were curious, to say the least: His body was found inside a trash bag, squeezed inside a metal garbage can that was inside a closet, which had been tied shut with rope. A mattress was leaning against it. No one had seen the 57-year-old man for about two weeks at his apartment near Patterson Park. Smelling a foul odor, a landlord entered, saw the closet and then called police. A patrol officer discovered the body. It was the morning of July 31, 1983.
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | August 8, 2006
At least 21 people in Maryland have died from the extreme heat this summer, including seven in Baltimore. Yet the names and addresses of the victims have not been made public or given to state and city agencies responsible for advising people on how to stay healthy. In some other states, such as Pennsylvania, the names of the victims of public health crises are released as soon as the cause of death has been determined. That allows independent agencies to analyze mortality trends and observe demographic or geographic patterns in deaths.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY and ANNIE LINSKEY,SUN REPORTER | June 21, 2006
Philip Merrill, the newspaper publisher and former diplomat whose June 10 disappearance during a lone sailing trip on the Chesapeake Bay prompted an intensive search, apparently committed suicide, the family said in a statement last night. "During the course of the [Department of Natural Resources] investigation into the disappearance of Phil, we have come to learn that the events that occurred on June 10 were in all likelihood the result of his own efforts to take his life," the family said in the statement, which was released in response to media inquiries.
NEWS
By RICHARD IRWIN and RICHARD IRWIN,SUN REPORTER | May 1, 2006
Police are using fingerprints in their attempt to identify a man fatally shot Saturday afternoon on a street in Baltimore's West Arlington neighborhood. No arrest had been made. Northwestern District uniformed officers responding to a report of a shooting found the victim in the rear of the 4100 block of Elderon Ave., between Granada and Eldorado avenues, shortly before 1:30 p.m. The victim had at least one wound to the upper body, said Officer Troy Harris, a police spokesman. The man was pronounced dead at the scene minutes later by Fire Department paramedics, and the body was taken to the state medical examiner's office.
NEWS
By GUS G. SENTEMENTES and GUS G. SENTEMENTES,SUN REPORTER | December 14, 2005
Family members of a detainee who fell ill and died at the state-run Central Booking and Intake Center on Monday said yesterday that they were stunned by the death and are awaiting further information from state prison officials. James Pugh Jr., 41, of West Baltimore was pronounced dead at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He passed out while waiting to be booked after his arrest on a warrant for violating terms of his probation. He had been there about four hours. Mark Vernarelli, a public safety spokesman, said that an investigation is in progress.
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ and JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTER | November 10, 2005
Two Baltimore men in prison for murder have raised questions about their convictions, which public defenders say could be answered through genetic evidence that prosecutors are refusing to allow to be tested. Based on DNA test results, a judge this week ordered a new trial for Robert C. Griffin, a city man convicted in 1986 of murdering a 20-year-old woman. Public defenders say that decision highlights the need to test old DNA whenever possible, but they say they have been hindered by city prosecutors who oppose reopening the cases.
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