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Medical Ethics

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By Frederick Rasmussen and Frederick Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2000
Dr. Philip Franklin Wagley, a prominent Baltimore internist who created and taught a highly regarded course in medical ethics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, died Thursday of bone marrow cancer at his home in the Woodbrook section of Baltimore County. He was 83. From his office in an elegant brownstone townhouse at 9 E. Chase St., next to the Belvedere Hotel, Dr. Wagley practiced internal medicine from 1950 until retiring in 1990. Through the years, his patients included writer H.L. Mencken and poet Ogden Nash as well as the prominent and not-so-prominent from across the world who came to Baltimore to consult with him about their ailments.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2012
Dr. Edward Lawrence Suarez-Murias, a retired psychiatrist and World War II veteran, died of pneumonia July 2 at his Roland Park home. He was 96. Named a Distinguished Life Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association, he practiced in Baltimore for more than 40 years. A family biography said he was born in Havana, Cuba, to Marguerite Suarez-Murias y Vendel of Brussels, Belgium, and Eduardo Ramon Suarez-Murias, a Havana resident. He attended grade school in Waterloo, Belgium, and in the public school system of Los Angeles, where his father, a mining engineer, settled the family.
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NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Frank D. Roylance and Gadi Dechter and Frank D. Roylance,SUN REPORTERS | April 19, 2007
Even with early warning signs and multiple campus interventions - as in the case of Virginia Tech gunman Cho Seung-Hui - a university's options for dealing with mentally ill students are limited by privacy laws and medical ethics. Despite two encounters with campus police in 2005 after harassment complaints by female students, and a brief commitment at a psychiatric hospital because of fears that he was suicidal, Cho remained a Hokie in good standing even as he plotted the massacre of 32 students and faculty Monday in Blacksburg, Va., authorities said yesterday.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | February 25, 2010
Barton Childs, a Johns Hopkins University pediatrics professor emeritus who worked in the field of inherited diseases, died of pneumonia Feb. 18. He was 93. Dr. Childs lived in Roland Park and died at Johns Hopkins Hospital. "We have lost a giant of his or any generation of medicine," said Dr. Edward D. Miller, dean and chief executive officer of Johns Hopkins Medicine. "His medical home was at Johns Hopkins, but his influence was worldwide." Born in Hinsdale, Ill., and raised in Chicago, he was an adopted child.
NEWS
By Katharine Q. Seelye and Katharine Q. Seelye,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 19, 2002
WASHINGTON - Just blocks from Ford's Theater, where Abraham Lincoln was assassinated in 1865, members of the Mudd family came to a federal courthouse recently in one more round of a 137-year-old case in which they are trying to clear the family name. Sitting in an appellate court were 10 of the 101 direct descendants of Samuel A. Mudd, the Maryland doctor who treated John Wilkes Booth, who had broken his left leg when he jumped down on the stage of Ford's Theater after shooting the president.
NEWS
July 8, 1991
"Talking Health," a half-hour weekly show produced by WNAV Radio 1430 AM, can be heard at 10:05 a.m. Wednesdays. The live broadcast features Marlene Prendergast as she interviews a different medical expert each week. Listeners are invited to call in and ask questions.Theschedule for the show is as follows:* Emotional Aspects of Weight Management, featuring Director of Annapolis Bariatrics Linda White on July 10.* What is Lupus? featuring Dr. Jack Lichtenstein on July 17.* One Year Anniversary Show/Anne Arundel Medical Center Update, featuring the center's staff physicians on July 24.* Medical Ethics featuring Dr. Nicholas Capozzoli on July 31.
NEWS
By Reported by Frank P.L. Somerville | January 6, 1995
"Medical Ethics and Pastoral Care" will be discussed by a broad sample of Baltimore-area clergy, physicians and other health-care professionals in a public program beginning at 9 a.m. Tuesday at Union Memorial Hospital.The seminar, scheduled to conclude at 3:30 p.m. at the hospital, University Parkway and Calvert Street, is co-sponsored by the Central Maryland Ecumenical Council and the McKendree School, an interfaith college of religion in Baltimore.The Rev. Clyde Shallenberger, who was chaplain of Johns Hopkins Hospital for many years before his recent retirement, will preside at the opening session on "The Patient's Best Interest."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 24, 1993
WASHINGTON -- In a case raising timely issues of health care policy as well as profound questions of medical ethics, a hospital suburban Virginia is appealing a Federal District Court's ruling that it must continue to provide life-sustaining treatment for a baby born there 11 months ago with most of her brain missing.The condition, a congenital defect known as anencephaly, is incurable and quickly fatal without medical intervention. An anencephalic baby has a brain stem, which keeps the heart and other organs working for a time.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 24, 2005
WASHINGTON - Military doctors at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, have aided interrogators in conducting and refining coercive interrogations of detainees, including providing advice on how to increase stress levels and exploit fears, according to new, detailed accounts given by former interrogators. The accounts, in interviews with The New York Times, come as mental health professionals are debating whether the doctors - psychiatrists and psychologists at the prison camp - have violated professional ethics codes.
NEWS
March 16, 1997
Richard C. Weibel, 66, contract managerRichard C. Weibel, 66, of Ellicott City, a retired Westinghouse Electric Corp. contract manager, died Feb. 5 of complications of surgery at Howard County General Hospital.He began his career with Westinghouse in his native Pittsburgh and moved to Baltimore in 1955. He worked in the controller's department until he was promoted to contracts management in the 1960s. He retired in 1988.He was married in 1953 to the former Jane O'Meara, who died in 1994.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Frank D. Roylance and Gadi Dechter and Frank D. Roylance,SUN REPORTERS | April 19, 2007
Even with early warning signs and multiple campus interventions - as in the case of Virginia Tech gunman Cho Seung-Hui - a university's options for dealing with mentally ill students are limited by privacy laws and medical ethics. Despite two encounters with campus police in 2005 after harassment complaints by female students, and a brief commitment at a psychiatric hospital because of fears that he was suicidal, Cho remained a Hokie in good standing even as he plotted the massacre of 32 students and faculty Monday in Blacksburg, Va., authorities said yesterday.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2005
South Korea's pioneering stem cell scientists have once again smashed a biological barrier and reignited a fierce ethical debate, spending three years to produce another cloned animal - a frisky, lovable puppy. The researchers, led by Hwang Woo Suk, insist that they cloned an Afghan hound only to help find cures for human diseases and improve techniques that make it easier to clone stem cells for use in human therapies. The team from Seoul National University told reporters yesterday that the dog, named Snuppy in honor of the school, was the lone success in an extensive effort subsidized by the South Korean government.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | July 29, 2005
Diana Paolitto was lying on a gurney late last year, all prepped for surgery to remove a major vein in her leg. In her 50s, she was alone and nervous, starting to feel the effects of the drugs she was getting through an intravenous tube and unable to see properly without the reading glasses she had given her husband for safekeeping. It was at this most inopportune moment that hospital staff thrust informed consent forms into her hand. "They didn't give me any time to process what they were having me sign.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 24, 2005
WASHINGTON - Military doctors at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, have aided interrogators in conducting and refining coercive interrogations of detainees, including providing advice on how to increase stress levels and exploit fears, according to new, detailed accounts given by former interrogators. The accounts, in interviews with The New York Times, come as mental health professionals are debating whether the doctors - psychiatrists and psychologists at the prison camp - have violated professional ethics codes.
TOPIC
By Julie Bell and By Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2005
DR. ALESSIO FASANO once publicly disclosed his research results without first ensuring that the University of Maryland, Baltimore, where he works, had secured the commercial rights. Scolded by a university technology manager, he altered his habits. These days, balancing the interests of private companies that provide a growing amount of income to academic institutions with ethical obligations is making life much more complex for university leaders and researchers such as Fasano. Fasano, 48, heads the university's Center for Celiac Research and is also chief scientific officer of Alba Therapeutics Corp.
NEWS
By Katharine Q. Seelye and Katharine Q. Seelye,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 19, 2002
WASHINGTON - Just blocks from Ford's Theater, where Abraham Lincoln was assassinated in 1865, members of the Mudd family came to a federal courthouse recently in one more round of a 137-year-old case in which they are trying to clear the family name. Sitting in an appellate court were 10 of the 101 direct descendants of Samuel A. Mudd, the Maryland doctor who treated John Wilkes Booth, who had broken his left leg when he jumped down on the stage of Ford's Theater after shooting the president.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Sun Staff Writer | May 19, 1995
The first director of the Johns Hopkins University's new Bioethics Institute said yesterday that while the standards for the use of human subjects in medical research have been tightened significantly in the past 50 years, a test subject's sturdiest protection remains the same.That protection, Ruth R. Faden said in a written version of her remarks, is "the integrity of the physician and the strength of her commitment to the patient's welfare."Dr. Faden spoke at a medical school ceremony marking the creation of the institute and her appointment as the university's first Wagley Professor of Biomedical Ethics.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 24, 1993
WASHINGTON -- In a case raising timely issues of health care policy as well as profound questions of medical ethics, a hospital suburban Virginia is appealing a Federal District Court's ruling that it must continue to provide life-sustaining treatment for a baby born there 11 months ago with most of her brain missing.The condition, a congenital defect known as anencephaly, is incurable and quickly fatal without medical intervention. An anencephalic baby has a brain stem, which keeps the heart and other organs working for a time.
NEWS
By Frederick Rasmussen and Frederick Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2000
Dr. Philip Franklin Wagley, a prominent Baltimore internist who created and taught a highly regarded course in medical ethics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, died Thursday of bone marrow cancer at his home in the Woodbrook section of Baltimore County. He was 83. From his office in an elegant brownstone townhouse at 9 E. Chase St., next to the Belvedere Hotel, Dr. Wagley practiced internal medicine from 1950 until retiring in 1990. Through the years, his patients included writer H.L. Mencken and poet Ogden Nash as well as the prominent and not-so-prominent from across the world who came to Baltimore to consult with him about their ailments.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | June 27, 1997
Yesterday's U.S. Supreme Court decision on physician-assisted suicide throws the issue back to the states. And Maryland is already one step ahead.Staff members at the state attorney general's office and the Johns Hopkins University Bioethics Institute are teaming up to investigate local and regional influences on the care of the dying.Through community meetings and focus groups, they will create a forum to look at physician-assisted suicide, but also at the larger, complex web of issues surrounding end-of-life care.
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