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NEWS
By New York Times News Service HC | September 29, 1991
Federal officials and other experts say that unscrupulous companies are abusing the Medicare home health care program by selling elderly people millions of dollars worth of medical equipment they do not need.Court records show that some suppliers have used aggressive sales tactics, including telephone solicitations; have induced gullible people to accept unneeded items; have submitted inflated, fraudulent bills to Medicare; and have filed claims through states that pay the most for a particular item, regardless of where the patient actually lives.
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NEWS
February 25, 2013
The home medical equipment industry has been growing ever since it became clear that getting patients out of the hospital sooner would reduce overall health care costs. Home medical equipment companies provide the products that disabled, elderly and infirm people need in order to live independently. They deliver the equipment, train patients and caregivers in its use and repair or replace it when needed. But in Maryland, a conflagration of regulatory events threatens to dismantle the industry.
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BUSINESS
By MARK GUIDERA and MARK GUIDERA,SUN STAFF | September 27, 1995
A Columbia start-up company that develops and makes medical diagnostic equipment plans to sign a $60 million contract tomorrow to supply a Russian health care company with disease-testing equipment, oral vaccines and medical equipment manufacturing expertise.The deal to be signed between Universal HealthWatch Inc., a privately held venture less than a year old, and Health Care Ltd., a publicly traded company on the Russian stock exchange, is considered by international trade experts as an example of the strong business opportunities for medical equipment and pharmaceutical companies as a result of the dismantling of the former Soviet Union's government-controlled health care structure.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2012
Daniel Borowy, the 17-year-old student shot in the cafeteria of Perry Hall High School on the first day of school, was discharged from the hospital Monday afternoon after two weeks recovering there, according to hospital officials and the family's pastor. "Everybody was very happy and relieved to see that he had gotten to a point that he could go home," Cindy Rivers, a Maryland Shock Trauma Center spokeswoman, said of how Borowy's medical team responded to his departure, which occurred between 5:30 p.m. and 6 p.m. Borowy's mother and father, sister and two brothers were at the hospital to bring him home, Rivers said.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff writer | January 29, 1992
Del. Donald B. Elliott had advocated strategically identifying and eliminating wasteful government spending, even before it became the new rallying cry among legislators.In the late 1980s, Elliott, R-Carroll, Howard, supported a bill that would have created a panel of business leaders to uncover inefficiencies in government. It was defeated repeatedly.Not until last year, in the midst of a recession, did a diluted version of the bill pass.In hindsight, Republican legislators, including Elliott, and other fiscal conservatives have rebuked their more free-spending colleagues with a resounding, "I told you so."
BUSINESS
April 27, 1991
Kirschner Medical Corp.This Timonium-based manufacturer of medical equipment reported an upswing in profits and revenues for the quarter that ended March 31.A company statement said that Kirschner had improved profits and revenues in its core domestic orthopedic and medical video businesses.Kirschner primarily develops and manufactures medical equipment that has applications in the field of orthopedics.In addition to its facilities in Timonium, the company has operations in Marlow, Okla.; Hopkinton, Mass.
NEWS
By Tim Baker | October 22, 1990
BEFORE LAST FALL'S overthrow of the Communist regime, an American traveling in the German Democratic Republic might have feared, more than anything else, a late-night encounter with the Stasi, the notorious secret police. But reunification has shut down the Stasi and revealed what any traveler in East Germany should have feared more than anything else all along: a serious encounter with a Communist medical system.Last month on a trip through Central Europe, my mother fell in a freak accident in Dresden and badly banged her hip and leg. The hotel staff summoned an ambulance by phone.
NEWS
By Mary Knudson | November 2, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Federal health officials denounced "fraud and abuse" in billings by some medical suppliers and announced plans yesterday to tighten regulations on Medicare payments for such equipment as wheelchairs, oxygen and braces."
NEWS
December 1, 1993
The Sykesville-Freedom District Fire Department recently took possession of its newest ambulance, a 1993 Excellance demonstrator that cost the company $90,000.President Bill Wagner said the vehicle is being outfitted with new radios and medical equipment and should be in service within the next two weeks. The new ambulance is white with red and blue "Z" stripes, he said."It's a big piece of equipment," Mr. Wagner said. "It has bigger space inside, a bigger chassis and longer body."He said the larger ambulance was needed partly for all the equipment needed for advanced life support that emergency medical technicians and cardiac rescue personnel need.
BUSINESS
By Adriane B. Miller and Adriane B. Miller,Special to The Sun | January 7, 1991
It's a fact of hospital life that patients demand state-of-the-art treatment and care. Even the smallest hospitals offer a dizzying array of sophisticated medical services to patients, using elaborate computerized equipment to help diagnose illness and injury.Maintaining the equipment -- computerized tomography (CT) scanners, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems, and other devices that help study body organs -- requires special skills. Not everyone with a socket wrench and knowledge of electronics qualifies as a technician.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Conrad, aconrad@tribune.com | October 23, 2011
Fans of medical dramas such as 'ER', 'Grey's Anatomy' and ' Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman ' certainly had plenty to enjoy in Sunday night's episode of 'The Walking Dead,' aptly titled ' Bloodletting '. In this episode, little Carl Grimes finds relief for his gunshot wound in the caring hands of surgeon/veterinarian Hershel Greene, one of several new additions to the cast of characters. Carl Grimes is in a bad way though, as the bullet fired from Otis' rifle has shattered into half a dozen jagged little pieces that need to be painstakingly removed in a process requiring medical equipment that Hershel does not have in his Civil War-era farm house.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2011
Bay Theatre's season-opening production of Margaret Edson's "Wit" may be the most compelling theater experience in the company's 10-year history. By all critical standards, this show is a winner, starting with artistic director Janet Luby's selection of this honest, powerful drama. A stellar cast provides riveting delivery, the direction is strong and "Wit" has the additional advantage of the Bay technical staff's providing scrupulous attention to detail. Edson's first play, "Wit" focuses on a 50-year old English professor battling metastasized Stage 4 ovarian cancer.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2011
Nelson Leighton "Pete" Bond Jr., a former Alex. Brown & Sons investment executive and business owner, died Monday of complications from diabetes at Good Samaritan Hospital. He was 75. Mr. Bond, whose father was executive vice president of McGraw Hill Publishing Co. and president of McGraw Hill International and whose mother was a homemaker, was born in Montclair, N.J., and raised in Essex Fells, N.J. After graduating from Montclair High School in 1953, he earned a bachelor's degree in history in 1957 from Lehigh University.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2010
On a recent Friday afternoon, a 40-foot metal shipping container clanged down in front of the Catonsville home of Martin and Audrey Peter. As soon as the massive container hit the pavement, a handful of men led by Martin Peter began filling it with medical equipment: motorized wheelchairs, walkers and assorted devices that had been stored in the Peters' home. The crew worked at a hurried pace — in just two hours the truck that had dropped the container would return to haul it to the Port of Baltimore, where it would be loaded onto a freighter bound for Durban, South Africa.
NEWS
By Rob Stein and Rob Stein,The Washington Post | September 21, 2009
WASHINGTON - -Many state and local governments are not adequately prepared to deal with a surge of patients in a flu pandemic or quickly distribute vaccine and antiviral drugs, according to two reports by federal investigators being released today. An analysis of preparations by five states and 10 municipalities around the country found that many had failed to take steps crucial during a pandemic, such as recruiting health care workers to volunteer, creating systems to track hospital beds and medical equipment, and determining how to manage a patient load that exceeds what emergency rooms are able to handle.
NEWS
July 19, 2003
John Paul "Jack" Hill, a retired medical equipment salesman, died of a heart attack July 12 at his Charles Village home. He was 57. Born in Baltimore and raised in Govans, he graduated from City College in 1963 and later attended the University of Maryland. Mr. Hill sold cardiac X-ray equipment for Toshiba, General Electric and Phillips until two years ago, when ill health caused him to retire. Earlier in his career, he had worked as an X-ray technologist for Johns Hopkins and the Bayview Medical Center.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | June 7, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Having learned in the last year that it did not have as much economic leverage over Japan as it thought, the Clinton administration signaled yesterday that it is ready to jettison its all-or-nothing, package-deal approach to a trade agreement with Japan and strike whatever arrangements it can get piece by piece.The U.S. trade representative, Mickey Kantor, hinted at the change in remarks to reporters yesterday. Since opening trade talks with Japan last July, the administration has been pressing Tokyo for a package deal, known as a "framework," that would consist of agreements for opening five priority markets in Japan: automobiles, auto parts, insurance, medical equipment and telecommunications.
NEWS
March 25, 1992
Carroll's pupil services director says it's just as well the Frederick and Carroll delegations withdrew a bill to create a pilot truancy program in both counties because suggested amendments would have diminished the legislation's intent.The program would have authorizedlaw enforcement officials to issue citations to students if they believed the youths were unlawfully absent from school. The citation would have made students subject to civil fines and would have triggeredan intervention process involving schools and possibly the juvenile system.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | July 2, 1997
A bankruptcy attorney representing Novatek International Inc., the former Columbia company under federal investigation for securities fraud, says the company and its major creditors are renegotiating a licensing agreement for medical diagnostic kits the company planned to market in Latin America and the Caribbean.It remains unclear, however, if a new licensing agreement would allow trading in Novatek shares to resume, thereby offering shareholders a chance to recoup losses they sustained when trading was halted by regulators in October.
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