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NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2005
In yet another attempt to kill legislation to give unmarried couples medical decision-making rights, Del. Donald H. Dwyer Jr. took the unusual preliminary step yesterday of trying to repeal the measure through a voter referendum. Dwyer, an Anne Arundel County Republican, said he filed petition requests with the Maryland State Board of Elections and attorney general's office. "I'm prepared to fight this every step of the way," said Dwyer of the bill, which would be effective July 1. Under Maryland election law, Dwyer would need to collect 51,195 signatures by June 30 of this year to get the question on the 2006 ballot, said Donna Duncan, director of the election management division of the Board of Elections.
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HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2014
An Alzheimer's patient is rushed to the emergency room, where her relatives tell doctors she has swallowed food down the wrong passageway. They insert tubes so she can take in air and fluids. She survives the crisis. But the visit is so invasive that it worsens her other chronic conditions. Months later, she dies in an exhausted state. It's a painful way to end a life, but Dr. Anthony Riley says it's one he sees all too often - and one patients and families can avoid if they plan carefully.
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NEWS
March 20, 1997
A BILL that would require health insurers to give patients the right to appeal unfavorable decisions on coverage would not entirely correct the imbalance of power that characterizes many of these situations. But it would be an important step in the right direction, and we urge its passage -- provided that insurers bear some of the costs.Health insurers, especially health maintenance organizations and other managed care groups, have profited handsomely on their ability to control spiraling costs for medical care.
NEWS
November 18, 2013
As Obamacare crumbles under the weight of its own complexity and dwindling popular support, Americans gain the opportunity to make genuine, systemic changes in health care funding, namely a single-payer program of Medicare-for-all. ( "Md. weighs options after Obama unveils fix to dropped insurance policies," Nov. 14). While touted as a dramatic reform measure, the Affordable Care Act merely solidifies an already broken system in which precious health care dollars are squandered on a Byzantine network of administrative costs and insurance industry profits.
NEWS
By FRANK BRUNO | April 5, 1997
YOUR MARCH 20 editorial, "Curbing the power of HMOs," contained a number of factual errors. The most blatant one was your assertion that "medical decisions are made not by physicians . . . but by bean-counters. . . ."I have been a sole practitioner for 25 years in Columbia. My specialty is family practice and I belong to several HMOs (over two-thirds of my patients are members of HMOs).I have never been told how to practice medicine by any HMO.I have been given practice guidelines on selected diseases (like asthma and heart failure)
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 12, 1990
High-tech medical treatment goes more often to private-pay patients than to people with public insurance or no insurance, according to a new study that found that how a person pays for his medical care may influence the kind of care he gets.The finding, to be published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association, may seem self-evident but, in fact, undercuts what many believe is a basic tenet of medicine -- that a person's care is dictated simply by the state of his health."The finding is alarming because I think the health care system is assumed to be set up in such a way that medical decisions are made on the basis of ... the clinical characteristics of patients," said Joel Weissman, an instructor in health policy at Harvard Medical School and a co-author of the paper.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | November 8, 1995
A former chief of Howard County General Hospital's medical staff is suing the hospital and three doctors for at least $80 million, alleging that "bad blood" and racism -- rather than questionable medical decisions -- led to the suspension last year of his privileges at the facility.In a federal lawsuit filed Monday, Dr. Kline A. Price Jr. -- a black gynecologist who claims to be Columbia's first private doctor and is the brother of National Urban League President Hugh B. Price -- lists a host of alleged medical miscues performed at the Columbia hospital by white physicians that were not punished.
NEWS
By Ruth Faden and Jonathan D. Moreno | May 1, 2009
It's a name only a policy wonk could love: comparative effectiveness research. But get ready to hear a lot about it; it could save your rights as a patient - and maybe even your life. If opponents have their way, it could be the bogeyman that brings down health care reform. Using false and misleading scare tactics, Conservatives for Patients Rights, a group opposed to comprehensive health care reform, announced last week a $1 million ad attacking comparative effectiveness. However, an emerging consensus of strange bedfellows - from insurance companies to the Institute of Medicine to patients rights advocates - all support making a national investment in research to compare the effectiveness of drugs, devices and diagnostic procedures, and sharing the information that results with physicians and patients.
FEATURES
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,The Boston Globe | April 18, 1995
'TC She is a 92-year-old woman -- anybody's mother, anybody's patient.Because of bad circulation, she developed a foot ulcer, for which surgeons offered two choices: Amputating the foot in a fairly simple surgical procedure, or a more complicated bypass operation to save her foot by grafting other blood vessels onto the decayed area.Her chances of walking were limited either way because of her severe arthritis. But her family wanted to save her foot. So she chose the bypass, and at first things went well.
NEWS
March 24, 1997
HMO regulations raise many more questionsIn a March 12 letter, "HMOs seen in need of more regulations," Steve Shearer supports legislation making physician administrators in health maintenance organizations accountable for their medical policy decisions.He references a March 5 article, "Stronger oversight of HMOs sought," that detailed current legislative efforts to micromanage health care in this state. I say such efforts are Band-Aids. We need a tourniquet.State and federal legislation created the problem.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2013
Former cardiologist Mark Midei took the stand Tuesday during the most recent civil suit against him and the previous owners of St. Joseph's Medical Center, in which the plaintiff is accusing him of performing unnecessary stent procedures. Much of his brief testimony centered on the types of evaluations Midei used when he considered Glenn Weinberg, a Baltimore businessman, for the procedures. Stents are mesh tubes that hold blocked arteries open to improve blood flow. Weinberg contends he lost at least $50 million because Midei wrongly led him to believe that he had severe coronary artery disease, leading him to curtail his business dealings.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2013
St. Joseph Medical Center did not have authority over the medical decisions cardiologist Mark Midei made for his stent patients, attorneys for the Towson hospital's former owners said in court Monday as they attempted to separate the institution from the doctor accused of performing unnecessary procedures. Midei's former patient, Glenn Weinberg, a Baltimore businessman who said he lost at least $50 million because the doctor misled him to believe that he had severe coronary artery disease, is suing the doctor and the hospital, the doctor's former employer.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
A Baltimore County judge denied Mark Midei's appeal for reinstatement of his medical license, ruling that there was "substantial evidence" for the Maryland Board of Physicians to revoke it last year after finding that the Towson cardiologist falsified patient records to justify the placement of unnecessary coronary stents. The decision ends an ordeal that began more than three years ago, when an anonymous letter was sent to the state board, claiming Midei, a well-regarded physician who earned a seven-figure salary at St. Joseph Medical Center, was improperly treating patients.
NEWS
By Ruth Faden and Jonathan D. Moreno | May 1, 2009
It's a name only a policy wonk could love: comparative effectiveness research. But get ready to hear a lot about it; it could save your rights as a patient - and maybe even your life. If opponents have their way, it could be the bogeyman that brings down health care reform. Using false and misleading scare tactics, Conservatives for Patients Rights, a group opposed to comprehensive health care reform, announced last week a $1 million ad attacking comparative effectiveness. However, an emerging consensus of strange bedfellows - from insurance companies to the Institute of Medicine to patients rights advocates - all support making a national investment in research to compare the effectiveness of drugs, devices and diagnostic procedures, and sharing the information that results with physicians and patients.
NEWS
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 10, 2008
WASHINGTON - Medical researchers and politicians are tiptoeing into an area of health care that makes some Americans uncomfortable, even angry, and it has nothing to do with such hot-button issues as cloning and stem-cell research. This time, the idea is to press doctors and patients to use particular drugs and treatments in order to save money. On the surface, it seems simple enough: Billions of dollars could be saved if everyone adopted the regimens that research showed were best and most cost-effective - which, experts say, happens far less often than most patients think.
NEWS
By ANDREW A. GREEN and ANDREW A. GREEN,SUN REPORTER | May 3, 2006
Maryland military veterans will get tax breaks worth up to $400 a year under a bill Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. signed into law yesterday. The governor also gave his blessing to measures designed to crack down on underage drunken driving and to allow unmarried couples -- including gays -- to make medical decisions for each other. But the big winners in yesterday's bill signing ceremony were veterans, always a politically popular constituency, who saw more than a half-dozen measures to honor and assist them win final approval in this election year.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | March 27, 2005
MOST OF US might never have heard of Terri Schiavo if she had put her medical wishes in writing. Now she has become a household name after Congress and the president entered the legal battle to prolong her life against her husband's insistence that she would have preferred to die rather than live with severe brain damage. The emotional case in Florida has many people across the country scrambling to get documents in place to spell out their wishes on life-sustaining treatment. The documents can go a long way toward helping family members who must make hard choices on behalf of loved ones who are unable to speak for themselves.
NEWS
January 4, 1997
WHEN IS LIFE no longer worth living? That ancient question has long received a standard response: That is not for men and women to decide.What about the 94-year-old woman who is "ready to go" but finds a new lease on life after a cataract is removed? Or the cancer patient who says he "can't take it anymore" -- until he gets proper pain medication? And what about the uninsured father who faces the agonizing choice of using his meager savings for treatment or finding a way to "go quickly" and leave something for his family to live on?
NEWS
By Karen Blum and By Karen Blum,Special to the Sun | August 5, 2005
When Nancy Welsh's breast cancer was diagnosed in June 2004, she and her husband began a lengthy process of interviewing physicians for her treatment. As the Laurel couple visited the offices of various oncologists, radiation specialists and plastic surgeons, they took careful notes, not only about the procedures being recommended but about the physicians' attitudes and office settings. They paid attention to which doctors took cell phone calls in the middle of their conversations or talked down to them, and who had outdated technology or dirty bathrooms.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2005
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. has staked out a middle ground on gay rights by signing two measures and vetoing two others. But rather than ducking controversy, he's left himself the task of finding compromise on the touchiest issue of the four - whether same-sex couples should have the same right to make medical decisions for each other that married couples do. The question stirs passions on both sides, with proponents saying that denying gays the right...
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