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BUSINESS
By Mark Stevens | December 24, 1990
It's no secret to business owners that health insurance costs are taking a big bite out of the bottom line. If that's not depressing enough, this huge cost factor threatens to spin out of control, turning once-profitable companies into money losers.To prevent this fate from befalling their businesses, CEOs must act promptly and decisively to control health-care expenses."The timing for health-care cost containment has never been better," says David Wudyka, president of Westminster Associates, a management firm specializing in human resources.
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NEWS
July 22, 2003
TEN YEARS after Bill and Hillary Rodham Clinton launched the fiasco that began as a bold bid to overhaul the nation's health care system, pressure to provide medical insurance for all Americans is building again. A return of double-digit increases in health insurance premiums has shaken business and political leaders out of the complacency that settled in during the late '90s boom years when insurers could rely on the stock market for profits. And while insurance costs are rising, the struggling economy robs employers and individuals of the wherewithal to pay them.
BUSINESS
By BRUCE JAPSEN and BRUCE JAPSEN,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 14, 2006
Hoping to prod an estimated 5 million uninsured Americans into buying health insurance, the American Medical Association backed yesterday a tax penalty for individuals and families who make enough to buy medical coverage but choose not to. The AMA's policymaking House of Delegates vote in favor of what it called "individual responsibility" comes as state and federal lawmakers are weighing similar ideas in the form of legislation in Congress and statehouses...
NEWS
By Stuart Butler | February 13, 1992
PRESIDENT BUSH'S long-awaited health-care reform plan may well reshape the debate over health care.The president has offered a solid plan for extending medical benefits to the estimated 34 million uninsured and has offered realistic proposals for solving some of the ancillary problems driving up health-care costs, such as malpractice lawsuits based more on greed than justice.But he doesn't push his reform plan far enough.What ails the U.S. health-care system is apparent to virtually everyone.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | May 17, 1992
Q: Could you list companies that cover medical expenses for travelers going out of the country?A: Here are some companies that offer medical insurance -- sometimes available only in combination with other kinds of coverage, such as trip cancellation. Bear in mind that most companies will not cover pre-existing medical problems, and their definition of such problems varies. Rates are for two weeks of coverage; longer-term coverage is also available. Some of the policies have a deductible for each claim.
NEWS
September 29, 1993
Clinton health plan needs more workAfter reading about the president's proposed national health care plan I am greatly disturbed at the level of naivete. While supposedly "all encompassing," it has many faults.The president says that everyone will contribute toward coverage, with employers large and small bearing a fair share of the expense. The plan proposed a 7.9 percent of payroll cap on large businesses, with all small businesses expected to contribute at a prorated level.The reality is that most large employers have contracts that were a result of collective bargaining.
NEWS
By JUDITH GRAHAM and JUDITH GRAHAM,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 6, 2006
CHICAGO -- With millions of Americans losing health insurance and crying for relief from soaring medical costs, Illinois is considering a bold and once-unthinkable proposal - extending medical coverage to all state residents. It's a daunting, politically divisive and potentially expensive prospect, with 1.8 million uninsured people in the state. But experts say health care reform might stand a better chance of passing in Illinois than almost anywhere in the nation. "The odds are long, but they're much better in Illinois than most other states," said Alan Weil, executive director of the National Academy for State Health Policy.
NEWS
By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,Staff Writer | November 2, 1993
When President Clinton and Congress finish pushing that health-care rock down the road a year or so from now, Frances Mackall, 32, will probably be at the end of the line awaiting treatment for a painful kidney stone.She is one of an estimated 37 million Americans without medical coverage.Removing the kidney stone would require an operation that costs $5,000, nearly half of what her family receives annually in Social Security and other benefits. Her remaining options seem to be these:* Acquire a life-threatening condition that qualifies her for free emergency room treatment.
NEWS
By Dallas Morning News | November 10, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Critics contend a U.S. Supreme Court decision not to stop the cutting of medical benefits for a man with AIDS will encourage employers across the country to lessen medical benefits for sufferers of many costly, chronic illnesses."
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1996
Moving to mend holes in the health-care safety net, Gov. Parris N. Glendening is expected today to propose giving government-financed medical coverage to thousands of uninsured children and pregnant women in Maryland.The governor's proposal would provide basic health insurance for more than 5,000 children age 3 and younger, and about 1,000 expectant mothers, according to sources familiar with the plan.The coverage would be offered to uninsured children and pregnant women from families earning up to 250 percent of the federal poverty level -- about $38,000 for a family of four.
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