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TRAVEL
By MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN and MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN,michelle.deal@baltsun.com, twitter.com/suntravelblog | March 29, 2009
Vacations are supposed to be good for your health, but what happens when you face a medical emergency in the middle of a trip? In Natasha Richardson's tragic case, a fall on a beginner's slope at a Canadian ski resort was deadly. But many other vacationers have suffered heart attacks, strokes, car crashes or other accidental injuries. Last month, several cruise passengers on an excursion in the Caribbean were seriously hurt when the bus they were riding in lost control and veered into a ditch.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | April 2, 2012
The Orioles have new orange and black banners along Russell Street and Pratt Street, and aren't they pretty, and aren't they grand, and shouldn't we be grateful? The banners proclaim "20 Years," and we're all supposed to understand and appreciate what that means - two decades since the fabulous, taxpayer-funded Oriole Park opened at Camden Yards. But, who cares? It's been nearly 30 years since the Orioles were in a World Series, 14-soon-15 since they had a winning season. In the Angelos era of Baltimore baseball, pessimism springs eternal in the human breast.
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FEATURES
By Jean Marbella | January 14, 1992
KATHLEEN NEWELL and her husband had been living nicely on his more than $100,000-a-year salary. But in the space of four years, her husband's was eliminated, -- and with it their medical coverage -- they had to trade their lakefront town house for a small apartment and she was diagnosed with cancer and now depends on doctors and hospitals to treat her despite her lack of insurance."
TRAVEL
By MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN and MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN,michelle.deal@baltsun.com, twitter.com/suntravelblog | March 29, 2009
Vacations are supposed to be good for your health, but what happens when you face a medical emergency in the middle of a trip? In Natasha Richardson's tragic case, a fall on a beginner's slope at a Canadian ski resort was deadly. But many other vacationers have suffered heart attacks, strokes, car crashes or other accidental injuries. Last month, several cruise passengers on an excursion in the Caribbean were seriously hurt when the bus they were riding in lost control and veered into a ditch.
NEWS
October 4, 1991
Thomas J. Bradley, 47, a Long Island teacher who won a highly publicized court battle last year to get medical coverage for a bone-marrow transplant to fight AIDS, died Sunday of an AIDS-related illness in Manhattan.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | September 20, 1995
Good morning, Hon. This feature died, but that didn't last.General Powell has restored the center to a Republican Party that isn't sure it wants one.Investigators at the Johns Hopkins University discovered that the poor have less medical coverage than the rich.Resurrection is invigorating. I recommend it.
NEWS
February 11, 2007
Ground rent reform proposed Lawmakers and Gov. Martin O'Malley unveiled a ground rent reform package that would make sweeping changes to the arcane system by preventing home seizures, tightening notification requirements and expanding homeowners' options for buying out ground leases. City rowhouse battle ends Baltimore Heritage has dropped its battle to save a row of historic downtown houses, clearing the way for Mercy Medical Center's $292 million expansion. Senator Theatre to be sold The Senator Theatre, one of the last of the nation's once-numerous art deco movie palaces and the only one still showing films in Baltimore, is scheduled to be sold at a foreclosure auction Feb. 21. Medical coverage for uninsured Maryland House of Delegates leaders unveiled a $600 million proposal that would extend medical coverage to nearly 250,000 uninsured residents.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 10, 1997
I am a retiree planning some extensive travel in Europe and Asia. Are there any Medicare-approved hospitals abroad?The only countries outside the United States in which Medicare provides coverage are Canada and Mexico.Even in those countries, Medicare, which helps pay for health-care services for people 65 and older and some disabled people, requires that the foreign hospital be closer and more accessible than the nearest U.S. hospital equipped to treat a patient.For Canadian coverage, at the time of the emergency a patient must be in Canada or traveling via Canada between Alaska and another state by the most direct route.
BUSINESS
By Donald Saltz | March 6, 1992
How surprising a stock can be. One of the analysts' favorites is Mid Atlantic Medical Services, a Rockville-based holding company for health-care organizations that this week reported its best year ever.Revenues soared and earnings improved substantially as the company increased the number of people it serves by more than two-thirds to nearly 600,000 people. So what did the stock do when the 1991 report was issued on Tuesday? It fell 3 points, to 11 1/4 , in very heavy trading.Analysts who were somewhat cool to Mid Atlantic last year have warmed up in recent months.
NEWS
February 8, 2007
WORLD Iraq dangerous for helicopters Iraq is becoming increasingly dangerous for the hundreds of U.S. military helicopters flying missions there. Five helicopters have gone down in Iraq in three weeks. pg 1a NATIONAL FDA approves weight-loss drug The Food and Drug Administration approved the first officially sanctioned weight-loss drug to be sold without a prescription. pg 6a MARYLAND Medical coverage for uninsured Maryland House of Delegates leaders unveiled yesterday a $600 million proposal that would extend medical coverage to nearly 250,000 uninsured residents.
NEWS
February 11, 2007
Ground rent reform proposed Lawmakers and Gov. Martin O'Malley unveiled a ground rent reform package that would make sweeping changes to the arcane system by preventing home seizures, tightening notification requirements and expanding homeowners' options for buying out ground leases. City rowhouse battle ends Baltimore Heritage has dropped its battle to save a row of historic downtown houses, clearing the way for Mercy Medical Center's $292 million expansion. Senator Theatre to be sold The Senator Theatre, one of the last of the nation's once-numerous art deco movie palaces and the only one still showing films in Baltimore, is scheduled to be sold at a foreclosure auction Feb. 21. Medical coverage for uninsured Maryland House of Delegates leaders unveiled a $600 million proposal that would extend medical coverage to nearly 250,000 uninsured residents.
NEWS
February 8, 2007
WORLD Iraq dangerous for helicopters Iraq is becoming increasingly dangerous for the hundreds of U.S. military helicopters flying missions there. Five helicopters have gone down in Iraq in three weeks. pg 1a NATIONAL FDA approves weight-loss drug The Food and Drug Administration approved the first officially sanctioned weight-loss drug to be sold without a prescription. pg 6a MARYLAND Medical coverage for uninsured Maryland House of Delegates leaders unveiled yesterday a $600 million proposal that would extend medical coverage to nearly 250,000 uninsured residents.
BUSINESS
By Marilyn Geewax and Marilyn Geewax,Cox News Service | February 8, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Wal-Mart Stores Inc. chief executive Lee Scott joined one of his toughest critics, labor leader Andrew L. Stern, yesterday to unveil a political campaign to promote universal health care coverage. The two longtime antagonists are helping lead a coalition of labor and business leaders in trying to get Congress to end the nation's reliance on employer-backed health insurance and develop a system for providing universal low-cost coverage within five years. "What unites us here today is our shared belief that it will be a far greater America when we get affordable health care for all Americans," Stern, president of the Service Employees International Union, said at a news conference at a Capitol Hill hotel.
NEWS
By Judith Graham and Michael Martinez and Judith Graham and Michael Martinez,Los Angeles Times | January 21, 2007
For almost a dozen years, conventional wisdom has dictated that far-reaching, national health care reform wasn't possible in this country. But political winds are blowing in a strong new direction. Now, states are seizing the initiative on this issue, challenging persistent policy deadlock in Washington. Business groups are standing with labor unions and consumer activists, calling for reform. Even the insurance industry has advanced a proposal for universal coverage. As a new wave of reform initiatives surges across the nation, Congress is showing interest in supporting state innovations and is likely to begin a renewed debate over which direction national reforms should take.
BUSINESS
By BRUCE JAPSEN and BRUCE JAPSEN,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 14, 2006
Hoping to prod an estimated 5 million uninsured Americans into buying health insurance, the American Medical Association backed yesterday a tax penalty for individuals and families who make enough to buy medical coverage but choose not to. The AMA's policymaking House of Delegates vote in favor of what it called "individual responsibility" comes as state and federal lawmakers are weighing similar ideas in the form of legislation in Congress and statehouses...
NEWS
By JUDITH GRAHAM and JUDITH GRAHAM,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 6, 2006
CHICAGO -- With millions of Americans losing health insurance and crying for relief from soaring medical costs, Illinois is considering a bold and once-unthinkable proposal - extending medical coverage to all state residents. It's a daunting, politically divisive and potentially expensive prospect, with 1.8 million uninsured people in the state. But experts say health care reform might stand a better chance of passing in Illinois than almost anywhere in the nation. "The odds are long, but they're much better in Illinois than most other states," said Alan Weil, executive director of the National Academy for State Health Policy.
NEWS
By KELLY BREWINGTON and KELLY BREWINGTON,SUN REPORTER | October 27, 2005
Attorneys for the Legal Aid Bureau filed a lawsuit yesterday on behalf of eight children, alleging that the state discriminated against them and other non-U.S. citizens by eliminating medical coverage for low-income, legal, permanent resident children. The lawsuit, filed yesterday in Montgomery County Circuit Court, asks that the cuts be declared unconstitutional and requests an injunction requiring the state to provide health coverage to the plaintiffs. "We feel that the budgetary cuts are discriminatory and violate the equal protection section of the state constitution," said Regan Bailey, a Legal Aid Bureau attorney for the plaintiffs.
BUSINESS
By Mark Stevens | December 24, 1990
It's no secret to business owners that health insurance costs are taking a big bite out of the bottom line. If that's not depressing enough, this huge cost factor threatens to spin out of control, turning once-profitable companies into money losers.To prevent this fate from befalling their businesses, CEOs must act promptly and decisively to control health-care expenses."The timing for health-care cost containment has never been better," says David Wudyka, president of Westminster Associates, a management firm specializing in human resources.
NEWS
By KELLY BREWINGTON and KELLY BREWINGTON,SUN REPORTER | October 27, 2005
Attorneys for the Legal Aid Bureau filed a lawsuit yesterday on behalf of eight children, alleging that the state discriminated against them and other non-U.S. citizens by eliminating medical coverage for low-income, legal, permanent resident children. The lawsuit, filed yesterday in Montgomery County Circuit Court, asks that the cuts be declared unconstitutional and requests an injunction requiring the state to provide health coverage to the plaintiffs. "We feel that the budgetary cuts are discriminatory and violate the equal protection section of the state constitution," said Regan Bailey, a Legal Aid Bureau attorney for the plaintiffs.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2004
With jockeys boycotting races at Churchill Downs and the nationally known Shane Sellers being escorted from the track in handcuffs, the National Thoroughbred Racing Association is stepping into the exploding crisis over jockeys' insurance. D.G. Van Clief Jr., commissioner of the NTRA, said yesterday that the NTRA will convene a working group to try to resolve the dispute that cost the Breeders' Cup a marquee rider and now threatens racing at the home of the Kentucky Derby. Terry Meyocks, special assistant to the NTRA and former president of the New York Racing Association, will preside over the group.
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