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By Jonathan Bor | June 23, 1991
In an era when the cost of medical care is downright frightening, a quiet revolution is going on inside Shepherd's Clinic, a trim suite just a few steps down from the sidewalks of St. Paul Street.Just listen to Kathy Moss, the administrator responsible for myriad chores, including making appointments and charging patients for their care."I'm not going to bill them; I'm not going to bill the patients," she said emphatically yesterday, a few minutes after the first patients walked into Baltimore's newest medical clinic.
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NEWS
By New York Times | May 13, 1991
WASHINGTON -- In his first response to calls for changes in the nation's health care system, President Bush is sending to Congress this week a plan to pressure states to limit court awards for medical malpractice.According to a draft of the proposal made available by White House officials, states would be encouraged to adopt limits on the amounts that malpractice victims can collect for pain and suffering, to set up mediation systems for resolving disputes and to strengthen medical licensing boards, among other things.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 12, 1994
NEW YORK -- A wide-ranging, three-year study of young American children to be released today confirms some of society's worst fears: millions of infants and toddlers are so deprived of medical care, loving supervision and intellectual stimulation that their growth into healthy and responsible adults is threatened.The plight of the nation's youngest and most vulnerable children, the report says, is a result of many parents' being overwhelmed by poverty, teen-age pregnancy, divorce or work.
NEWS
By Bruce Japsen and Bruce Japsen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 11, 2002
CHICAGO - Low-quality health care in the United States is costing nearly $400 billion a year, about 30 percent of the total $1.3 trillion annual medical expenditures in the nation, according to a study to be released today in Chicago. Medical errors and unnecessary treatments to misused drugs and bureaucratic waste - new research suggests such problems compromise quality medical care and each year cost private employers $1,700 to $2,000 per insured worker. The findings in a study commissioned by the Chicago-based Midwest Business Group on Health come as employers are wrestling with soaring health-care costs.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | October 8, 2000
Aside from God, who has been endorsed by both major political parties, the big issue in the presidential campaign is health care. Every time we turn on the TV, we see either an ad from the Republicans telling us how horrible Al Gore's health-care plan is, or an ad from the Democrats telling us how horrible George W. Bush's plan is. So to summarize what we, as voters, have learned from this campaign: If Gore is elected: Health care will be controlled by...
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1996
Baltimore County officials are moving to bolster medical services to women jammed into an overflowing jail, but say inmate complaints about other problems aren't easily fixed in the outmoded building.EMSA Correctional Care, a Florida firm that has the $1.4 million annual contract for medical care at the county's jails, is ready to hire a physician's assistant to improve services for inmates, said county Corrections Administrator James M. Dean.But, he added, only emergency care is available nights and weekends, and conditions in the women's jail are difficult, especially when the 40-year-old building is so crowded.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 1, 2003
WASHINGTON - With reports that hundreds of Army National Guard and Reserve soldiers mobilized for the war on terror are living in substandard military base housing and sometimes waiting months for medical care, the Army is sending more medical staff to the bases and moving the soldiers to better quarters. But Sen. Patrick J. Leahy, a Vermont Democrat and co-chairman of the National Guard Caucus, said he wonders whether the problems, which surfaced at Fort Stewart, Ga., are widespread. He wants an investigation of more than a dozen other bases where part-time soldiers stay before heading to duty overseas.
NEWS
By Jessica Valdez and Jessica Valdez,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2003
Baltimore physician Bill McConnell's first trip to Honduras was as part of a relief team after a 1998 hurricane that devastated the Central American country. And although the effort was meant to provide emergency relief wrought by Hurricane Mitch, McConnell soon realized that Honduras - one of the poorest countries in the Western Hemisphere - required assistance that went beyond the need created by that single catastrophic storm. "It's a developing country," he said. "Most of the people don't have access to the most basic health care."
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 3, 2003
SHUMULLI, Iraq - Residents of this farming community southeast of Baghdad believed they had good reason to fear the approach of American troops. According to what Iraqi government officials have told them, the Americans planned to steal their land and kill all their young men. But a convoy of U.S. Marines rumbled into the community's palm fringed streets this week to attempt to prove them wrong. The Marines came bearing gifts of medical care, water and food for the community of 30,000.
NEWS
By Reginald Fields and Reginald Fields,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2003
Tony Davis is homeless, jobless, doesn't have a doctor, doesn't have medical insurance, but he does have ailments that could use a physician's touch. Despite his circumstances, Davis is fortunate. He's getting the medical attention he needs and from an unlikely source -- a full-fledged primary care doctor's office on wheels that visits two Baltimore homeless shelters each week. Davis, with bloodshot eyes, raspy voice and toothy smile, strolls into the huge white mobile home parked outside the Franciscan Center in Charles Village and looks for nurse practitioner Bill Gough, whom he has seen almost exclusively since first using the vehicle for medical care in May 2001.
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