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BUSINESS
By Bruce Japsen and Bruce Japsen,Chicago Tribune | November 16, 2006
CHICAGO -- Tired of paying for botched medical procedures and low-quality medical care, some of the nation's largest businesses called on U.S. hospitals yesterday to agree to apologize and waive costs related to so-called "never events" - medical errors these employers say should never happen. Both the Leapfrog Group, a national coalition of large health care purchasers such as Boeing Co., General Motors Corp., General Electric Co., Lockheed Martin Corp. and Marriott International Inc., and the Midwest Business Group on Health, a Chicago business coalition representing more than 80 local employers, said hospitals should commit to new policy on 28 health care never events as a way to make providers of medical care more accountable.
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NEWS
By Doug Donovan and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
The July death of a 10-year-old disabled foster child has been ruled a homicide — six years after the Baltimore city boy's mother was accused of shaking him into a coma-like state, Baltimore police announced Monday. Damaud Martin died July 2 at an Anne Arundel County group home that state regulators were in the process of closing down for multiple problems. State health officials are investigating whether Damaud received adequate care while living at the home, which was run by a company called LifeLine, but have cautioned against drawing any premature conclusions.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | August 15, 2012
Not so long ago mixing a shopping trip with a visit to the doctor might not have crossed most people's minds. But the concept has caught on quickly. Clinics located in drug stores, supermarket and retail stores are attracting a rapidly growing number of patients, according to a new study released Wednesday by research group the RAND Corporation. Researchers found that visits to retail medical clinics increased four-fold from 2007 to 2009. Visits reached 5.97 million in 2009, compared to 1.48 million in 2007.
NEWS
ByJoe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
Officials at an animal rescue center in Harwood said Friday they are housing the feral cat that last week prompted closure of Richard Henry Lee Elmentary School in Glen Burnie. Anne Arundel County school officials had spotted the cat last Friday and, after failing to capture it, closed the school over concerns that students might be bitten or scratched. The cat was finally caught Sept. 2 by county animal control officials. On Friday, officials from Rude Ranch Animal Rescue in Harwood, a volunteer-based nonprofit, said animal rescue had brought the feline to its facility.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2012
You can see why a state might require minors to have a parent's OK before they receive medical care. But Maryland law has made life especially difficult for homeless teenagers who have no adults watching out for them. It's the sort of problem that drives Lisa Stambolis crazy. As director of pediatric and adolescent health at Health Care for the Homeless in Baltimore, she organized people — including homeless teens — to press for change. It worked. A new law offering more leeway for minors' medical treatment goes into effect Oct. 1. In July, Stambolis was honored for her efforts and named a White House "Champion of Change," one of 13 selected for their efforts on behalf of homeless youth.
NEWS
By Richard C. Reynolds | June 2, 1993
THE national debate on health care reform has highlighted a fundamental flaw in our medical system -- the lack of doctors, even for those who have insurance, in rural and inner-city areas.There is only one practical way to deliver medical care to the tens of millions of Americans who lack it: mandatory public service by physicians.At the end of 1992, an estimated 3,700 non-specialist physicians were needed in medically underserved areas. Although many physicians provide care to the needy at a reduced fee or no charge, volunteer efforts, splendid as they are, will never reach all Americans isolated by poverty, geography or residence in inadequate nursing homes, prisons or mental institutions.
NEWS
September 19, 2002
The Coalition of Geriatric Services and the Howard County Office on Aging will offer a day of free workshops, "Arm Yourself With Knowledge: Your Rights, Your Risks in Medical Care," from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. today at the Ellicott City Senior Center. The conference aims to raise awareness of what an individual can do to prevent medical errors. Attendees can register for door prizes and visit exhibits from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Del. Elizabeth Bobo will discuss "A Statewide Perspective" at 2 p.m., and Kathryn Chrystal of St. Agnes Home Health Care and Hospice will discuss "Medical Records: A Personal Perspective" at 2:30 p.m. Other workshops and discussions include "Medical Records Rights" by elder law attorney Patricia Storch at 3 p.m.; "Hospital How-To's With Medical Records" by Nancy Smith, director of nursing at Howard County General Hospital, at 4 p.m.; "Medications: Herbal Interactions" by Lynn Shumake, a pharmacist of natural medicine, at 4:30 p.m.; and "Problematic Medications for Older Americans" by Lillian Alade, a pharmacist at Howard County General Hospital, at 5:10 p.m. Chrystal also will discuss "Medication and Safety of Administra- tion" at 5:30 p.m. The public is invited to attend the whole program or drop in for individual sessions.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2004
Anne Arundel County inmates are getting medical care too cheaply, and work-release inmates are being undercharged for their expenses, according to a county audit of its detention centers that was released Friday. The report also says the detention centers have been improperly collecting $25 fees from inmates enrolled in a community service program. And it notes several examples of other improper fee collections and inadequate oversight of funds. "I'm not overly alarmed," said Richard J. Baker, the superintendent of detention facilities.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | February 5, 2002
GUANTANAMO BAY NAVAL BASE, Cuba - One captive expressed surprise when he woke up after surgery to repair a gunshot wound he had suffered in Afghanistan. He told his doctor he thought he was going to be killed. Several other captives have thanked doctors and nurses for easing their pain by treating their wounds and infections. The Taliban and al-Qaida prisoners brought to Guantanamo for confinement and medical care until American officials can figure out what to do with them are supposed to be among the hardest of a hard lot. But the medical staff brought in to treat them say they have generally been cooperative and appreciative.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 31, 2006
President Bush's expected push for health reform in tonight's State of the Union address could face significant political obstacles, but the president is counting on the public's deepening frustration with rising medical costs to overcome the resistance. Bush's proposals include a significant extension of tax breaks for individual medical spending and a broad expansion of tax-free health savings accounts, according to sources. The goal is to make medical markets more efficient and give consumers an incentive to shop more carefully for health care.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
As kids spend time in the water, officials warn parents to keep a close watch to ensure children don't drown. But there is another condition parents should know about: secondary drowning. It afflicts children who survive a near-drowning incident. And though it's uncommon, it can be fatal if left untreated, according to Dr. Melissa Sparrow, clinical director for pediatric inpatient and emergency services at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. What is secondary, or dry, drowning? Secondary drowning is a term that is used by the public, and less so by physicians.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan | April 7, 2014
The former owner of St. Joseph Medical Center has agreed to pay up to $37 million to resolve allegations that cardiologist Mark G. Midei put hundreds of patients through unnecessary heart stent procedures, according to court documents. As many as 273 patients stand to get payments of at least $134,000 before lawyers' and other fees. The settlement represents a major step toward resolution after more than four years of court fights that began when St. Joseph informed hundreds of people that their surgeries might not have been needed.
NEWS
March 4, 2014
The op-ed from Laura Howell ( "Minimum wage debate ignores crucial group," Jan. 15), touches on the heart of the issue: Should those who render care and assistance to people with special needs be forgotten as we try to address the issue of the minimum wage? Obviously the answer is no. Further, while her excellent piece focuses on the here and now, I would urge legislators to also look forward. The people served by this workforce present plenty of challenges today, but like everyone else they are aging.
NEWS
January 24, 2014
Blood donations The Greater Chesapeake and Potomac Blood Services Region of the American Red Cross is requesting blood donations. Eligible donors can call 800-GIVE-LIFE to schedule an appointment. Platelet donors should call 800-272-2123. Dance classes Presented by Vantage House, a retirement community, classes are held from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Thursdays in the Vantage House auditorium, 5400 Vantage Point Road in Columbia. Dance has shown to improve balance, gait and mood in those with Parkinson's disease.
NEWS
January 18, 2014
With increasing frequency, the editorial pages of local and national newspapers are featuring articles on liberalizing the use of marijuana. In view of the 2013 legislative action in the states of Washington and Colorado - plus a failed push in the state of Oregon - to provide legalization for recreational use as well as for medical care, focus on the ongoing debate is highly appropriate. However, support for medical purposes is a markedly different matter than establishing and trying to control marijuana availability for recreational use. Senior legislators, judges and candidates for higher offices who are approving and promoting recreational legality and less criminal consequence have decidedly forgotten the psyche of their youth with recognized lack of reality about mortality and the tendency - or even need - of teenagers to "explore" new experiences.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | June 23, 1991
In an era when the cost of medical care is downright frightening, a quiet revolution is going on inside Shepherd's Clinic, a trim suite just a few steps down from the sidewalks of St. Paul Street.Just listen to Kathy Moss, the administrator responsible for myriad chores, including making appointments and charging patients for their care."I'm not going to bill them; I'm not going to bill the patients," she said emphatically yesterday, a few minutes after the first patients walked into Baltimore's newest medical clinic.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 12, 1994
NEW YORK -- A wide-ranging, three-year study of young American children to be released today confirms some of society's worst fears: millions of infants and toddlers are so deprived of medical care, loving supervision and intellectual stimulation that their growth into healthy and responsible adults is threatened.The plight of the nation's youngest and most vulnerable children, the report says, is a result of many parents' being overwhelmed by poverty, teen-age pregnancy, divorce or work.
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