Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMedical Bills
IN THE NEWS

Medical Bills

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Steve Lopez | July 8, 1994
Philadelphia -- EVER SINCE I wrote about a man who thought his mother's medical bills were outrageous enough that someone should be arrested, two things have happened.Doctors have called or written to tell me I don't know what I'm talking about. And more patients have called or written to tell me about their own outrageous medical bills.At first I thought this additional information might make it easier to understand medical billing, collection and reimbursement.I was wrong.After additional research, I can now speak with some authority when I tell you the system is a mess, and even more subject to abuse than I imagined.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | April 7, 2014
Marylanders with serious medical conditions that could be alleviated by marijuana would gain access to the drug with a physician's consent under legislation passed by the General Assembly Monday. The House and Senate approved a compromise between their differing versions of the bill just hours before the end of the 2014 General Assembly session Their action sends the measure to Gov. Martin O'Malley, who is expected to sign the bill. The legislation supersedes a medical marijuana bill passed that year that set up a system that never got off the ground.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1996
Oh deer -- it isn't over.Two hunters who locked horns over a prize buck may end up in court again, but this time the dispute will be over money, not antlers.Baltimore resident Edward L. Sanders has filed a civil suit against Charles A. Weaver in Howard County Circuit Court seeking $150,000 in damages for injuries he suffered in November when Weaver assaulted him in a dispute over a deer.Weaver, of Glen Burnie, was convicted of assault and battery in April. He was ordered to spend 60 days in jail on work release.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | March 15, 2014
The Maryland House gave preliminary approval Saturday to a bill that would make it easier for caregivers to administer medication to patients in mental hospitals against their wishes. The action clears the way for a final House vote Monday on the measure, which is based in part on recommendations from a panel set up by Gov. Martin O'Malley after the 2012 shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Conn.  Similar legislation was passed unanimously in the Senate. Some advocates for people with mental illness argue that such measures are inhumane and violate patients' rights.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 7, 1995
DANVILLE, Va. -- Janie H. Hunt works as a receptionist here at the Danville Regional Medical Center, and even though she is earning $5 an hour at the age of 55, she has never enjoyed a job more.Mrs. Hunt's part-time job was created as part of a new voluntary barter system that allows former patients who were uninsured or underinsured to work off some of the money they owe for unpaid medical bills.Mrs. Hunt, who owed the hospital $15,000 for gall bladder surgery, is one of 18 former patients in the program with bills that ranged from several hundred dollars to more than $20,000.
NEWS
By DANIEL S. GREENBERG | January 6, 1993
Washington -- America's soaring medical bills have bee designated economic enemy No. 1 on Bill Clinton's reform agenda. They're eating up money needed for industrial rejuvenation and other worthy purposes, the president-elect says. And rising costs, he adds, are pricing too many people out of the health-care market.But the incoming administration faces an awesome, perhaps impossible, task in trying to control the economics of the health-care system. Savings are surely possible and must be pursued, but they're greatly overshadowed by forces for even greater spending.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Staff Writer | October 27, 1993
The governor's budget secretary told legislators yesterday that his office has uncovered at least $31 million in state employee medical bills dating to 1992 that the Department of Personnel apparently failed to pay.But budget officials -- acknowledging that they are skeptical about the accuracy of figures supplied by the Personnel Department -- said it is unclear how much of the money owed to Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland is part of a previously estimated...
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Staff Writer | March 1, 1993
In the blink of an eye, Scott Rudolph became a national celebrity -- the University of Maryland Terrapin mascot who broke his arm during a televised run-in with the Virginia Cavalier.His arm never healed fully from the injury at a football game in 1988, but the 26-year-old Sykesville resident has finally won the battle with his alma mater over who is responsible for his medical bills.Mr. Rudolph figured that as a mascot who was paid $25 for some events, he was an employee of the university and therefore entitled to worker's compensation benefits.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | January 4, 1996
Gerald McClellan wakes up in his Freeport, Ill., home every morning, believing it is night because of the perpetual darkness that surrounds him, and grows confused and angry when his request to head for the gym and begin training for his next fight is ignored."
NEWS
By Gary Gately | December 4, 1990
He always pitied them, he says, the people he had seen and read about, the ones sleeping in doorways, the ones panhandling on the streets, the ones whose teeth chattered on the TV news on frigid winter nights.Just a few years ago, such images sprung to his mind when he thought of the homeless.Then, suddenly, the 60-year-old grandfather's perception of the homeless changed. He became one of them."Homeless?" Bill says, his eyes widening, his bushy gray-flecked eyebrows rising. "I never even gave it much of a thought.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2014
The House of Delegates gave preliminary approval Saturday to legislation that would liberalize its current law allowing the use of marijuana for medical purposes.  The legislation, sponsored by Baltimore County Democratic Del. Dan K. Morhaim, would replace a system created last year that is now widely regarded as a failure. Under that system, medical marijuana can only be prescribed through a program run by an academic medical center. After the law took effect last year, no medical center agreed to participate, making it impossible for patients to gain legal access to the drug.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | February 26, 2014
If the third try's the charm, the Maryland Senate gave preliminary approval Wednesday to a bill aimed at untangling for the third time an emotional controversy over dog owners' liability if their pets bite someone. The bill would reverse a Court of Appeals opinion declaring that pit bulls are "inherently dangerous", a decision that has prompted many landlords in the state to evict the dogs - or threaten to kick out their owners - to avoid potential liability if someone is bitten on the premises.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
Prompted by recent multimillion-dollar medical malpractice judgments, Maryland lawmakers are pushing to create a fund to help pay for treating babies who suffer neurological injuries during birth. Proposed legislation calls for hospitals and doctors with obstetrics and gynecological practices, as well as malpractice insurers, to pay annual fees to the birth injury fund, which families could tap to pay medical bills, recoup lost earnings potential and cover other costs. Virginia, Florida and New York are the only states with such funds.
NEWS
January 6, 2014
The General Assembly should approve Gov. Martin O'Malley's emergency proposal to allow temporary and retroactive enrollment in the state's existing high risk health insurance pool for those whose efforts to enroll in new plans were stymied by the technical disaster of Maryland's Obamacare exchange. The governor's proposal doesn't begin to make up for the damage done by the state's failure to deliver a workable exchange and may in fact provide a viable option for few of those who have suffered as a result.
BUSINESS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2013
Jerry Bailey can look back on a Hall of Fame jockey career that featured 5,892 victories but also the searing memory of 17 fractures, including a broken back, jaw and collarbone, and several busted ribs. Yet Bailey considers himself lucky. He never sustained an injury that kept him off the track more than several months. And unlike many jockeys, he could afford disability insurance designed to fill the gap between what riders need after life-altering accidents and what they receive from racetrack policies.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
The General Assembly is poised to pass legislation that would make Maryland the 19th state to legalize marijuana use for medical reasons - though how quickly the state's cancer patients and others might benefit remains in question. The state Senate gave the legislation preliminary approval Friday evening without debate. The bill, which has passed the House, would allow the legal distribution of marijuana by doctors and nurses through academic medical centers. A commission would be set up to spell out the terms under which it would be grown and dispensed.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2002
CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, the area's largest health insurer, reported yesterday second-quarter profit of $24.6 million, up 11 percent from $22.2 million in the corresponding period last year. However, medical costs escalated faster than premium revenue. Growth in membership and a reduction in the administrative costs ratio accounted for the additional earnings. Medical bills for CareFirst's 3.2 million members came in at $1.54 billion, 14.9 percent more than in the year-earlier quarter.
BUSINESS
By William Salganik and William Salganik,SUN STAFF | September 1, 2002
On a waiting list for a heart transplant, Sanusi Cole wishes he had more medical bills. If he had enough -- more than $6,000 worth -- he'd be eligible for the state's Medicaid program. His cardiologist has assured him that he'll get the transplant when his turn comes, regardless of his insurance status. Meanwhile, he's been on an insurance merry-go-round. Sometimes he's covered, sometimes he's not. He got a Medicaid card in mid-August, and for the first time in months he was able to obtain most of his expensive heart, liver and kidney medications.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2013
Legislation to allow academic centers to dispense medical marijuana is headed to the House of Delegates after two committees endorsed the proposal Wednesday. The bill would allow doctors and nurses to give the drug to cancer patients, those with intractable pain and others.  Gov. Martin O'Malley's administration has backed what it called a "yellow-light approach" to medical  marijuana. A House committee earlier this month killed a broader proposal to create "compassionate care" centers to distribute medical marijuana.  Del. Dan Morhaim, a doctor, introduced the measure that passed the Health and Government Operations and Judiciary committees Wednesday.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.