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NEWS
May 7, 2012
I would like to respond to Dan Rodricks ' column on taking DNA samples from people who are arrested ("DNA: Why wait for an arrest?" May 3). I support his opinion, but I think he could have included more reasons, especially for a general gathering of DNA. If all of us gave samples, the medical world would benefit tremendously. Close matching organ donors could be located immediately. Untold information could ease the tracking of diseases from the common cold to virulent cancers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 17, 2013
As a Howard County retired teacher [almost 30 years service] and on Medicare, I am disturbed that the Board of Education abruptly changed the medical benefits plan. In the past my coverage has been excellent. Now, starting on Jan. 1, 2014, the coverage is changing and unclear. It doesn't seem to be written in print. From what I have read, it doesn't seem that Howard County General Hospital is available to me except in an emergency. What about the excellent coverage and reputation of Johns Hopkins Hospital?
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NEWS
December 17, 2013
As a Howard County retired teacher [almost 30 years service] and on Medicare, I am disturbed that the Board of Education abruptly changed the medical benefits plan. In the past my coverage has been excellent. Now, starting on Jan. 1, 2014, the coverage is changing and unclear. It doesn't seem to be written in print. From what I have read, it doesn't seem that Howard County General Hospital is available to me except in an emergency. What about the excellent coverage and reputation of Johns Hopkins Hospital?
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2012
The American Academy of Pediatrics is modifying its stance on circumcision for the first time in more than a decade, acknowledging that the health benefits outweigh the risks of the procedure, which involves removing the foreskin of a baby boy's penis. In new recommendations it plans to announce Monday, the group doesn't go as far as suggesting that all babies should have the operation. But when parents choose it for their sons, insurance companies and state Medicaid programs should pay for it, the academy now says.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Sun Staff Writer | May 16, 1994
Indicted Baltimore Comptroller Jacqueline F. McLean's medical insurance benefits ran out over the weekend, jeopardizing her continued treatment for depression at a private psychiatric hospital.Mrs. McLean, who is accused of stealing more than $25,000 in public funds and trying to arrange a city lease for the former headquarters of her travel agency, has been under care at Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital in Towson.Her city health benefits expired Saturday, however, and Mrs. McLean could either be discharged or committed to a state mental health institution, warned her attorney, M. Cristina Gutierrez.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2002
As Bethlehem Steel Corp. looks for a way out of its financial morass and Congress debates whether the government should help, retirees of Sparrows Point are watching anxiously to see what happens to the benefits they thought they had earned after decades of work at the plant. The Baltimore area is home to about 20,000 Bethlehem retirees and surviving spouses. They count on the steelmaker for their pensions and to help pay for their medical benefits and prescription drugs. But with the company in Chapter 11 bankruptcy and facing pension and health-care obligations of about $5 billion without nearly enough funds to pay for them, the once solid benefits retirees counted on are now anything but. "It's scary, really," said Fred Crenshaw, 65, of Edgewood, who worked at the Sparrows Point tin mill for nearly 43 years before retiring four years ago. "If I had to put out for medical expenses, I'd be bankrupt - I'd be in Chapter 11 or Chapter 7 myself."
NEWS
By Harry Rosenfeld | December 28, 1997
It was widely deemed good news that yet another medical study, this one more comprehensive than earlier ones, confirmed the medical benefits of taking one drink a day. A shot a day keeps the doctor at bay; it's a saying in the process of establishing itself.It doesn't matter much whether it's a glass of wine, a stein of beer or a shot of whiskey. In whatever guise, booze will do much DTC to enhance the longevity of the imbiber. It's best for codgers and those in middle life than for the sprouts.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2012
About 1,500 Sparrows Point workers overflowed a union hall Monday with urgent questions about the future of the recently sold steel mill - questions that mostly don't have answers yet. The Baltimore County complex's $72.5 million sale to a redevelopment firm working with a liquidation company was approved by a federal bankruptcy judge last week. Benefits for the mill's roughly 2,000 employees are about to end. The meeting came shortly after RG Steel, saying payment obligations under union contracts "are simply too much … to bear," disclosed in court papers that it had come to an agreement with the United Steelworkers of America on an end date.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | May 9, 1999
The primary elections for Baltimore's next mayor might be four months away, but at least one community group has begun building its campaign agenda on two issues it views as critical to the city: better-paying jobs and medical benefits.Four years ago, Baltimoreans United for Leadership Development (BUILD) successfully pushed for the city to adopt a "living wage" bill requiring any business receiving a city contract to pay workers at least $6.10 an hour, well over the $4.25 minimum wage at the time.
NEWS
By Brent Jones, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2010
Five months into a court order requiring the state to speed up delivery of food stamps and medical benefits to low-income residents, Department of Human Resources officials say more Marylanders are getting those services at a quicker pace. As of the end of May, the compliance rate for food stamps was about 89 percent, up 6 percentage points from the beginning of February, according to the DHR. The compliance rate for the Maryland Children's Health Insurance program was 85.7 percent, up 6 percentage points; and the rate for the Temporary Cash Assistance program was 93.8 percent, up about 5 percentage points since February.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2012
About 1,500 Sparrows Point workers overflowed a union hall Monday with urgent questions about the future of the recently sold steel mill - questions that mostly don't have answers yet. The Baltimore County complex's $72.5 million sale to a redevelopment firm working with a liquidation company was approved by a federal bankruptcy judge last week. Benefits for the mill's roughly 2,000 employees are about to end. The meeting came shortly after RG Steel, saying payment obligations under union contracts "are simply too much … to bear," disclosed in court papers that it had come to an agreement with the United Steelworkers of America on an end date.
NEWS
May 7, 2012
I would like to respond to Dan Rodricks ' column on taking DNA samples from people who are arrested ("DNA: Why wait for an arrest?" May 3). I support his opinion, but I think he could have included more reasons, especially for a general gathering of DNA. If all of us gave samples, the medical world would benefit tremendously. Close matching organ donors could be located immediately. Untold information could ease the tracking of diseases from the common cold to virulent cancers.
NEWS
By Brent Jones, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2010
Five months into a court order requiring the state to speed up delivery of food stamps and medical benefits to low-income residents, Department of Human Resources officials say more Marylanders are getting those services at a quicker pace. As of the end of May, the compliance rate for food stamps was about 89 percent, up 6 percentage points from the beginning of February, according to the DHR. The compliance rate for the Maryland Children's Health Insurance program was 85.7 percent, up 6 percentage points; and the rate for the Temporary Cash Assistance program was 93.8 percent, up about 5 percentage points since February.
NEWS
By Austin Lopez | June 7, 2010
Patients and potheads alike rejoiced a few weeks ago when the District of Columbia Council voted to legalize medical marijuana use. The unanimous decision adds D.C. to the 13 states that have already circumvented national legislation in order to allow doctors to write prescriptions for the infamous herb. (Maryland does not sanction medical marijuana but allows drug defendants to cite medicinal need as a potential mitigating factor.) Although the issue of medical marijuana remains contentious, the council's decision reflects the drug's growing acceptance in the eyes of the voting population.
NEWS
By Brent Jones | brent.jones@baltsun.com | March 15, 2010
Three months after a judge ordered the state to speed up delivery of food stamps and medical benefits to low-income Maryland residents, the problem has worsened, court filings show. At the end of January, the state's Department of Human Resources was operating at an 81 percent compliance rate processing those requests, down 2.5 percentage points from the previous month, according to papers filed in Baltimore Circuit Court. Lawyers for the plaintiffs say the decline shows that the state - which faces a year-end deadline to improve services - continues to struggle.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones , brent.jones@baltsun.com | December 11, 2009
A Baltimore Circuit Court judge ruled Thursday that the state has failed to deliver food stamps and medical benefits in a timely manner to thousands of Marylanders, and he ordered a corrective action plan to be filed by late January. Judge Barry Williams ruled that the Department of Human Resources needs to fully comply by the end of 2010 with a law that requires that emergency and medical benefits be received by applicants within 30 days. The case was brought by a Baltimore County woman who sued the state after she applied for food stamps in February but did not receive the services until April, more than 60 days after the request.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2000
As relatives remembered Officer Kevon M. Gavin yesterday as "the essence of a family man," police charged a 17-year-old Baltimore youth with first-degree murder in connection with his death. Eric Stennett of the 800 block of Harlem Ave. was released from Maryland Shock Trauma Center yesterday and was taken to Central Booking and Intake Center after being charged last night, said Sgt. Scott Rowe, a police spokesman. Police said Stennett, wearing a bulletproof vest and armed with a semiautomatic handgun, was fleeingafter officers allegedly saw him shoot an 18-year-old man near South Pulaski Street and Wilkens Avenue in Southwest Baltimore.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | May 5, 1995
Former Baltimore Comptroller Jacqueline F. McLean, whose political career ended with her conviction in a corruption scandal last year, is fighting to keep her pension.Lawyers for Mrs. McLean yesterday appealed a decision by city trustees to revoke her $23,850 annual pension. The seven-member pension board voted in a closed-door session April 6 that Mrs. McLean had to relinquish her benefits because she was convicted of theft and misconduct.Mrs. McLean tearfully pleaded guilty in September to stealing thousands in taxpayer dollars by having a fictitious employee on her payroll.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | October 27, 2008
While researching the multitude of questions that come with being a new mother, Tina Overton encountered one that made her dizzy: whether to circumcise her newborn son. She never had reason to think about it before, let alone consider an alternative. But quickly, Overton became familiar with a small but vocal minority of parents and researchers arguing against circumcision. After months of scouring books, articles and the Internet, she reasoned the procedure was unnecessary, painful - and a violation of her son's human rights.
BUSINESS
By Janet Kidd Stewart and Janet Kidd Stewart,Chicago Tribune | February 4, 2007
We spend years (we hope) saving for retirement and years (again, we hope) managing the nest egg while in retirement. But what about that pivotal year when we hang it up? Miss a deadline or miscalculate a 401(k) payout and you could be in real trouble. So here's a guide to getting the proverbial ducks in a row in that final 12 months leading up to quitting time: Make sure you can do this. Many workers start dreaming about quitting long before their bank accounts would justify doing so. "They get it in their head that they're going to retire by a certain age, and it's hard to shake," said Patricia Wiley, a New York-based principal with Ernst & Young who co-wrote the firm's retirement planning guide.
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