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EXPLORE
October 19, 2011
We all hear that prevention is the key to wellness. However, people with certain insurances and public assistance such as Medical Assistance lack the basic preventative care that they need. I have not seen a dentist in about 18 years simply because dentists in the area will not accept patients who have insurances with Medical Assistance. People like me cannot pay out of pocket for one reason or another. Furthermore, people like me are on Medical Assistance for a reason, such as disability.
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HEALTH
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2013
The O'Malley administration has settled a class action lawsuit brought by critics who accused the state of failing low-income and disabled Marylanders by regularly taking nearly a year to approve medical assistance applications as part of a severe backlog. The settlement means the Maryland Department of Human Resources will process claims faster and work to eliminate a backlog of more than 9,000 delayed cases, according to the Public Justice Center, the Homeless Persons Representation Project and the National Center for Law and Economic Justice, the organizations that filed suit.
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NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff Writer | October 31, 1992
AIDS activists staged an 11th-hour protest yesterday to draw attention to the state's decision to eliminate health insurance for more than 30,000 poor and disabled Marylanders.The cut is just one of several that go into effect Sunday. To avoid a $450 million shortfall at the end of the current fiscal year, Gov. William Donald Schaefer has cut a total of $240 million from programs.A broad range of services will be affected, but the poor are taking an especially hard hit. In addition to abolishing Medical Assistance, the state will roll back welfare checks to 1988 levels, giving a family of three $359 a month.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2013
A 26-year-old inmate at a state prison in Jessup died Friday after he was found with severe head injuries on Thursday night, Maryland State Police said. Javaughn A. Young was found lying on a walkway in a wing of the Maryland Correctional Institution about 7 p.m., after another inmate alerted correctional officers that an inmate needed assistance, police said. More than 60 inmates are housed in the wing. The officers found Young with severe head trauma and called for medical assistance, police said.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | December 28, 1996
Hundreds of Maryland residents are set to lose federal disability and medical assistance benefits Wednesday because they are alcohol- or drug-addicted, a cutoff state officials fear will almost certainly increase the number of homeless and strain local programs for the poor.Under legislation approved by Congress this year, people will no longer be able to claim an addiction as a disability to qualify for Supplemental Security Insurance (SSI), which carries with it Medicaid benefits.An estimated 2,338 residents of Maryland fall into that category.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | July 6, 1993
The Anne Arundel County health department, joining a growing number of agencies that are privatizing some services, turned over to a Baltimore-based company last week a program that provides transportation for Medicaid recipients.Yellow Transportation Inc. began dispatching its vans and sedans to county residents who have valid Maryland Medical Assistance cards and who have no other way to get to doctor's appointments."This is the transportation of last resort," said Douglas Hart, director of administration for the health department.
BUSINESS
September 29, 2002
Dear Mr. Azrael: We are a couple in our 70s - both have adult children from previous marriages. To safeguard "their inheritance" we have kept our money separate. My husband owns the home we live in. We often consider downsizing - either to a condo (which he would own) or an apartment (investing the money from the sale of this house). We've heard owning a home protects that investment in the event he would have to go to a nursing home. Since my name would not be on this home (or condo)
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1999
Thousands of Marylanders may have left the welfare rolls over the last two years only to have their health insurance improperly cut off due to a bureaucratic snags, according to advocates and state officials who are trying to correct the problem.Other families that have tried unsuccessfully to join the welfare rolls also may have been wrongly denied Medicaid."I'm excited to be working, and in another sense I'm depressed," said Darlene Curry, a Northeast Baltimore woman with diabetes and asthma who has struggled to regain medical assistance since leaving welfare in 1997 for a job as a school custodian.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | December 9, 1991
The state health secretary today announced the start of the "Maryland Access to Care" program, designed to save $24 million in Medicaid costs in the next fiscal year while improving the delivery of health-care services to the state's growing medical assistance population."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | October 14, 2007
The Harford County Health Department will open a dental clinic early next year that will provide care for some of the 7,000 children who are eligible for medical assistance but have little access to a dentist. The number of children receiving medical assistance has increased by 238 percent since 2000 and there could be many other eligible youths who are not enrolled in the program, said Dr. Andrew Bernstein, Harford County's health officer. "There is a real need for this service," Bernstein said.
NEWS
March 8, 2013
What! I can't believe it. The Sun reports that Secretary of State John Kerry promises to give Egypt $190 million to help the government pay its bills ("Egypt deal with IMF of paramount importance: Kerry," Mar. 2). Last week I heard it was $60 million. That was bad enough. They shouldn't get anything since Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi has formed an alliance with Hamas who is supported by al-Qaida and Iran. We can't buy their loyalty when a majority of them advocate that Sharia law is their goal, not democracy.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2013
Citing a severe and chronic backlog, advocacy groups have filed a class-action lawsuit accusing the state of failing low-income and disabled Marylanders by regularly taking nearly a year to approve medical assistance applications. The lawsuit, filed last week in Baltimore Circuit Court on behalf of nearly 10,000 disabled adults, seeks to force the Department of Human Resources to approve the Medicaid applications within 60 days, as required by state law. The advocates allege that nearly 46 percent of applications in 2012 were illegally delayed.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2012
Baltimore will send an "ambulance strike force" to New Jersey to help victims of superstorm Sandy, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said Wednesday.  “The people of Baltimore stand with the people of New Jersey and New York who have suffered great damage and tragedy as a result of this historic storm," the mayor said in a statement.  Two Baltimore city medics and a supervisor will travel to New Jersey, overseeing a team of five medic units...
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2012
One city firefighter received minor injuries battling a three-alarm fire that broke out Thursday morning in a commercial building in the 1700 block of Fleet Street near Broadway in Fells Point. According to Chief Kevin Cartwright, spokesman for the Baltimore City Fire Department, the fire was reported around 5:30 a.m. in a three-story, mid-block building with a liquor store on the first level. He said fire fighters reported heavy smoke on the first level and fire on the second and third levels.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2012
Owings Mills ophthalmologist Marc Honig and his son, Evan, could have simply donated some money to help the disadvantaged in Honduras. They could have collected some old eyeglasses, or solicited their colleagues and fellow students for help, or tried to convince big corporations to hand over cash and equipment. In fact, they've done all of that — and more. This weekend, the Honigs are beginning a week-long stay at a makeshift medical clinic in a small Honduran village. They and some 40 other doctors and students will volunteer their time, screening and treating thousands of villagers from the surrounding area, bringing healing to a corner of the world desperately in need.
NEWS
June 24, 2012
As a practicing endocrinologist, I write with heavy heart regarding your article on medical insurance ("Maryland braces for Supreme Court decision on health care reform law," June 19). Through the years of recession, several patients of mine lost their jobs and could not afford their office co-pays. Unfortunately, among them were people with diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease. Even those with insurance had high deductibles and had to meet the cost of an office visit up front.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2000
New positions Jurkowsky named VP of Lockheed naval unit Lockheed Martin Corp. appointed Thomas J. Jurkowsky vice president, communications and public affairs, for its Baltimore-based naval electronics and surveillance systems division. A 30-year Navy veteran and retired rear admiral, he was chief of naval information before joining the Bethesda-headquartered defense and space technology contractor. Jurkowsky graduated from Boston University and holds a master's degree from American University.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2013
Citing a severe and chronic backlog, advocacy groups have filed a class-action lawsuit accusing the state of failing low-income and disabled Marylanders by regularly taking nearly a year to approve medical assistance applications. The lawsuit, filed last week in Baltimore Circuit Court on behalf of nearly 10,000 disabled adults, seeks to force the Department of Human Resources to approve the Medicaid applications within 60 days, as required by state law. The advocates allege that nearly 46 percent of applications in 2012 were illegally delayed.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2012
After three years of intense scrutiny, a Baltimore judge has decided that the state had done enough to get poor Marylanders signed up quickly for food stamps, medical help and cash assistance — a decision that has advocates for the poor worried that the problems will return. The Department of Human Resources hailed Thursday's ruling by Circuit Judge Barry Williams, which found the state was processing nearly all of its applications within the time allowed by law — typically 30 days after an application is submitted.
EXPLORE
October 19, 2011
We all hear that prevention is the key to wellness. However, people with certain insurances and public assistance such as Medical Assistance lack the basic preventative care that they need. I have not seen a dentist in about 18 years simply because dentists in the area will not accept patients who have insurances with Medical Assistance. People like me cannot pay out of pocket for one reason or another. Furthermore, people like me are on Medical Assistance for a reason, such as disability.
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