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By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2012
A Patriots fan's tweet Sunday night - intended for Ravens wide receiver Torrey Smith - has ignited a firestorm on the web, raising new questions about the way online discourse intersects with real life. "Hey, Smith, how about you call your bro and tell him all about your wi--- ohhhh. Wait. #TooSoon?" wrote Baltimore resident Katie Moody, posting as @katiebrady12, as Smith caught two touchdowns in the Ravens' 31-30 win over the Patriots. The game and the Tweet came less than 24 hours after Smith's younger brother Tevin Jones was killed in a motorcycle accident.
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SPORTS
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2012
A Patriots fan's tweet Sunday night - intended for Ravens wide receiver Torrey Smith - has ignited a firestorm on the web, raising new questions about the way online discourse intersects with real life. "Hey, Smith, how about you call your bro and tell him all about your wi--- ohhhh. Wait. #TooSoon?" wrote Baltimore resident Katie Moody, posting as @katiebrady12, as Smith caught two touchdowns in the Ravens' 31-30 win over the Patriots. The game and the Tweet came less than 24 hours after Smith's younger brother Tevin Jones was killed in a motorcycle accident.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2012
Everyone who has ever tuned into a cable channel has heard the names Natalee Holloway and Laci Peterson. Show hosts like Nancy Grace have used their TV pulpits to chronicle the disappearance of such white, female victims night after night. But what about black victims like Yasmin Acree or missing sisters Diamond and Tiondra Bradley? That's one of the questions raised by a new docu-series, "Find Our Missing," hosted by S. Epatha Merkerson and produced by TV One, the African-American-themed cable channel based in Silver Spring.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2012
Everyone who has ever tuned into a cable channel has heard the names Natalee Holloway and Laci Peterson. Show hosts like Nancy Grace have used their TV pulpits to chronicle the disappearance of such white, female victims night after night. But what about black victims like Yasmin Acree or missing sisters Diamond and Tiondra Bradley? That's one of the questions raised by a new docu-series, "Find Our Missing," hosted by S. Epatha Merkerson and produced by TV One, the African-American-themed cable channel based in Silver Spring.
NEWS
By McCLATCHY NEWSPAPERS | May 23, 2007
The biggest difference in this and the kids 10 or 15 years ago who played fantasy role-playing games like Dungeons & Dragons and, later, the people who engaged in multiplayer online role-playing games is you can't really characterize current users as geeks or loners. These are people with lives, real friends." - BETH COLEMAN, a professor of comparative media studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, on the occupants of popular online fantasy worlds such as SecondLife.com, which has more than 6 million virtual residents
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | November 6, 1992
Peggy Say writes that Terry Anderson has never thanked her for her 6 1/2 -year effort to get him released from captivity in Lebanon, but in a statement yesterday she said she didn't blame him, citing her own "unrealistic expectations."In December's Redbook, Ms. Say said she had barely seen her brother since his release Dec. 4 and that they speak only occasionally. She notes that he invited two of her siblings -- but not her -- to the Bahamas where he retreated after his release. "I felt crushed that he hadn't invited me," Ms. Say writes.
NEWS
August 4, 2001
Funeral services for commercial photographer Daniel James Breitenbach, who died at Maryland Shock Trauma Center after a helicopter crash Wednesday at Baltimore-Washington International Airport, will be held at 11 a.m. Monday at the Ruck Towson Funeral Home, 1050 York Road. Mr. Breitenbach, 50, was a free-lance photographer who did work for state agencies. He lived in Parkville. For 10 years he also shot sports and feature photos for the Weekly Record, a paper circulated in southern York County, Pa. Born in Baltimore and raised in Parkville, Mr. Breitenbach was a 1969 graduate of Parkville High School.
NEWS
September 18, 1995
The text type used in the new Sun is a customized version of a font known as Ionic No. 5, which was developed in the late 1920s specifically for newspapers and which quickly became one of the most popular in America.The typeface first appeared in the Evening News of Newark, N.J., in 1926. Within 18 months of its introduction, more than 3,000 newspapers across the country were using Ionic No. 5 for their text.One reason this type is so popular, beyond its classic look, is that it is all but impossible to reproduce badly.
NEWS
March 1, 1998
Ken Fuson, a writer for The Sun's Today section, has been awarded the top prize in feature writing by the American Society of Newspaper Editors for his June 1997 series "A Stage in Their Lives."The six-day series, which chronicled the making of the musical "West Side Story" at North County High School in Anne Arundel County, won the ASNE's 1998 Distinguished Writing Award for nondeadline writing.It was one of seven annual journalism prizes awarded by the society, made up of top editors from daily newspapers in the United States and Canada.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jarrett Graver and Jarrett Graver,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 16, 1998
Don't expect any paparazzi to lurk outside the Baltimore DTC Museum of Art, but when the first Johns Hopkins Film Festival opens today at 7 p.m. with a screening of Paddy Breathnach's gritty Irish crime fable "I Went Down," more than a few "indie" (independent) film buffs will be on hand to herald the return of the film festival to Baltimore.Each winter, Hollywood relocates to a small, snow-covered town in Utah to fete a wealth of quirky independent films with chilled beluga and distribution deals, but ever since poor ticket sales and spoiled sentiment combined to deep six Charm City's own folksy version of Sundance - the Baltimore International Film Festival - area fans of indie films have been left out in the cold.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | August 5, 1997
Just a year after becoming director of the writing seminar at the Johns Hopkins University, cultural critic Mark Crispin Miller has accepted a post at New York University because, he says, he has not been granted sufficient respect or support by Hopkins.Miller, 47, has written extensively on advertising and film. But he has received perhaps his widest exposure for his deeply skeptical views on corporate control of U.S. news organizations and of the effects of the evolving new media."I've been a one-man band here all along.
FEATURES
By New York Times Sun feature reporter Henry Scarupa contributed to this article | February 4, 1991
John Sivert was surprised recently when his 7-year-old daughter, Laura, returned home from her second-grade class at the Fulton School in Minneapolis and announced, "You shouldn't accept everything you see on television commercials as truth."But Mr. Sivert should not have wondered at his child's precociousness. Like all public school students in Minneapolis, she is learning to be "media literate."Long the bane of teachers who denounced its hypnotic allure and saw it competing with books for children's time, television is slowly but surely entering American classrooms as a subject.
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