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NEWS
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,Sun Reporter | April 15, 2007
The morning Don Imus uttered the phrase that appears to have ended his career, Ryan Chiachiere was watching. The veteran shock jock's comment was so incendiary that the 26-year-old researcher for Media Matters in America, a liberal media watchdog group, took the rare step of removing his headphones and repeating the slur to his co-workers in the room, who were also glued to various forms of programming. But the rest of what happened April 4 at the group's Washington office was fairly routine.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 27, 2014
It's usual that an accusation against reporters comes from the political right, whether alleging they're in the tank for President Obama or that they're giving Hillary Clinton a free ride on the Benghazi terrorist attacks. But now a charge comes from the political left, passed on by a professional news kibitzer, Media Matters for America. Its website carries an article titled "By rehabilitating Iraq War boosters, is the press forgiving itself?" Eric Boehlert, a staff member, argues that in the latest military crisis in Iraq, some television reporters have gratuitously given airtime to Bush architects of the 2003 invasion to dump on Obama.
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BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2005
Two days after Staples Inc. became the first company to say it was limiting advertising on Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. television stations because of customer complaints about one-sided news coverage, the office supply chain softened its stance yesterday. While still acknowledging e-mail complaints in part caused it to stop advertising on Sinclair's local programs, Staples issued a statement saying it "does not let political agendas drive our media-buying decisions." In a phone interview last night, Staples spokesman Paul Capelli said the company issued the statement to clarify its position.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2013
The TV remarks about gay marriage that Johns Hopkins surgeon Dr. Benjamin Carson made this week on Fox News were denounced Thursday by a faculty colleague who directs a university program on sexuality and gender. "We have been trying to have an open discussion about this issue, and obviously we support his right to free speech," Todd Shepard, co-director of the school's Program for the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality, told The Sun Thursday night. "But what he said is not about opening up discussion, it's about shutting it down by scaring people.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | February 25, 2012
Pat Buchanan might have seen the end of the line coming at MSNBCwhen, last month, network president Phil Griffin commented on his latest book, "Suicide of a Superpower," by saying, "I don't think the ideas that [Buchanan] put forth are appropriate for the national dialogue, much less on MSNBC. " When Mr. Buchanan was let go last week after 10 years as a commentator on the network, no one was surprised. I don't agree with some of Mr. Buchanan's ideas, especially regarding Jews, his questioning of whether World War II had to happen or whether the United States should be involved militarily in the Middle East, but he has every right to his ideas, as we all have the right to our own. It's called free speech.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | December 15, 2004
Mark Hyman, the on-air editorial voice of Sinclair Broadcast Group, says he's "amused" by a campaign that a coalition of liberal public interest groups has launched against him and the Hunt Valley-based broadcaster. Led by Media Matters for America, a Web-based watchdog organization aimed at monitoring conservative thought in the media, the group claims that Sinclair "abuses the public airwaves" at its 62 owned or operated TV stations, particularly by airing a Hyman commentary segment, `The Point,' without opposing points of view.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | May 8, 2007
WASHINGTON -- A couple of new studies about race and gender bias got me to thinking about an age-old question: Is it possible to think in a racist way without being consciously racist? How about sexist? Stephen Colbert indirectly raises such questions when he declares on his Comedy Central show The Colbert Report that "I don't see race." Unless you are pitifully tone-deaf to irony, you can tell that Mr. Colbert is putting us on with his flip certainty. I don't care what race you are - asserting too casually that race isn't important is a risky invitation to be fooled by how differently the world looks to people of different races.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2013
The TV remarks about gay marriage that Johns Hopkins surgeon Dr. Benjamin Carson made this week on Fox News were denounced Thursday by a faculty colleague who directs a university program on sexuality and gender. "We have been trying to have an open discussion about this issue, and obviously we support his right to free speech," Todd Shepard, co-director of the school's Program for the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality, told The Sun Thursday night. "But what he said is not about opening up discussion, it's about shutting it down by scaring people.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 24, 2007
A story, probably apocryphal: Impatient driver is waiting at intersection as pedestrian crosses in front of him. Pedestrian is slow. Driver leans from his window and yells, "Get out of the street you (bleep) liberal." As I said, the story - I picked it up in a magazine somewhere - probably didn't happen. But it sure feels true, doesn't it? We are, or so we have lately been told, no longer a nation of red, white and blue. Now we are simply red and blue - squishy, effete, egg-headed, godless and liberal along the coasts; principled, tough, instinctive, God-fearing and conservative in between.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2012
With Mitt Romney now officially President Obama's opponent, it truly appears to be game on at the Fox News channel -- at least, if this morning's "Fox & Friends" is any indication. Today's version of the morning show featured an anti-Obama video that resembled propaganda films from 1930's Europe more than it did responsible TV politics of today. And the remarkable thing was the witless crew on the couch that serves as hosts for this show had the audacity to present it as journalism and congratulate the producer who put it together.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2012
While much is being made of Karl Rove's post-election return to the air this week on Fox, I don't think that's really the news that matters these days at Rupert Murdoch's channel. Reflecting in a way the very post-election GOP malaise that they discussed, both Bill O'Reilly and Rove seemed off their games Wednesday night on "The O'Reilly Factor. " Two of the most self-confident blowhards in American media and political life seemed less confident, less energized, less animated than I have ever seen either when it comes to saying bad things about President Obama.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2012
With Mitt Romney now officially President Obama's opponent, it truly appears to be game on at the Fox News channel -- at least, if this morning's "Fox & Friends" is any indication. Today's version of the morning show featured an anti-Obama video that resembled propaganda films from 1930's Europe more than it did responsible TV politics of today. And the remarkable thing was the witless crew on the couch that serves as hosts for this show had the audacity to present it as journalism and congratulate the producer who put it together.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | February 25, 2012
Pat Buchanan might have seen the end of the line coming at MSNBCwhen, last month, network president Phil Griffin commented on his latest book, "Suicide of a Superpower," by saying, "I don't think the ideas that [Buchanan] put forth are appropriate for the national dialogue, much less on MSNBC. " When Mr. Buchanan was let go last week after 10 years as a commentator on the network, no one was surprised. I don't agree with some of Mr. Buchanan's ideas, especially regarding Jews, his questioning of whether World War II had to happen or whether the United States should be involved militarily in the Middle East, but he has every right to his ideas, as we all have the right to our own. It's called free speech.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | October 27, 2010
First, a confession: I listen to NPR. Sometimes, when I have to explain this fact to my right-wing brethren, I'll forgo trying to make the case that much of what NPR does is simply great radio and instead I'll note that it's more useful to listen to enemy broadcasts than more friendly fare. This is a serious point. Like never before, it's now possible to get all of your news from avowedly nonliberal or explicitly right-wing media outlets. (It's been possible to dine exclusively on liberal fare since World War II, at least)
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 24, 2007
A story, probably apocryphal: Impatient driver is waiting at intersection as pedestrian crosses in front of him. Pedestrian is slow. Driver leans from his window and yells, "Get out of the street you (bleep) liberal." As I said, the story - I picked it up in a magazine somewhere - probably didn't happen. But it sure feels true, doesn't it? We are, or so we have lately been told, no longer a nation of red, white and blue. Now we are simply red and blue - squishy, effete, egg-headed, godless and liberal along the coasts; principled, tough, instinctive, God-fearing and conservative in between.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | May 8, 2007
WASHINGTON -- A couple of new studies about race and gender bias got me to thinking about an age-old question: Is it possible to think in a racist way without being consciously racist? How about sexist? Stephen Colbert indirectly raises such questions when he declares on his Comedy Central show The Colbert Report that "I don't see race." Unless you are pitifully tone-deaf to irony, you can tell that Mr. Colbert is putting us on with his flip certainty. I don't care what race you are - asserting too casually that race isn't important is a risky invitation to be fooled by how differently the world looks to people of different races.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 27, 2014
It's usual that an accusation against reporters comes from the political right, whether alleging they're in the tank for President Obama or that they're giving Hillary Clinton a free ride on the Benghazi terrorist attacks. But now a charge comes from the political left, passed on by a professional news kibitzer, Media Matters for America. Its website carries an article titled "By rehabilitating Iraq War boosters, is the press forgiving itself?" Eric Boehlert, a staff member, argues that in the latest military crisis in Iraq, some television reporters have gratuitously given airtime to Bush architects of the 2003 invasion to dump on Obama.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2012
While much is being made of Karl Rove's post-election return to the air this week on Fox, I don't think that's really the news that matters these days at Rupert Murdoch's channel. Reflecting in a way the very post-election GOP malaise that they discussed, both Bill O'Reilly and Rove seemed off their games Wednesday night on "The O'Reilly Factor. " Two of the most self-confident blowhards in American media and political life seemed less confident, less energized, less animated than I have ever seen either when it comes to saying bad things about President Obama.
NEWS
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,Sun Reporter | April 15, 2007
The morning Don Imus uttered the phrase that appears to have ended his career, Ryan Chiachiere was watching. The veteran shock jock's comment was so incendiary that the 26-year-old researcher for Media Matters in America, a liberal media watchdog group, took the rare step of removing his headphones and repeating the slur to his co-workers in the room, who were also glued to various forms of programming. But the rest of what happened April 4 at the group's Washington office was fairly routine.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2005
Two days after Staples Inc. became the first company to say it was limiting advertising on Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. television stations because of customer complaints about one-sided news coverage, the office supply chain softened its stance yesterday. While still acknowledging e-mail complaints in part caused it to stop advertising on Sinclair's local programs, Staples issued a statement saying it "does not let political agendas drive our media-buying decisions." In a phone interview last night, Staples spokesman Paul Capelli said the company issued the statement to clarify its position.
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