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By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2011
Investment company T. Rowe Price has invested $461.3 million across several mutual funds in Facebook, Twitter and other social media companies, according to regulatory filings. The investments make up only a small fraction — less than 1 percent — of each fund's portfolio, but show the growing interest by investors to buy a stake in social media companies poised to eventually initiate a public offering. Price had $482 billion in assets under management at the end of last year.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
Don Scott will sign off for the last time Friday morning at WJZ -TV after 40 years at the station. Tens of thousands of Baltimore viewers have started their day with him for the more than three decades that he's been at the station's morning anchor desk. That's a run not likely to be duplicated by many in the new media world. And WJZ has consistently finished at or near the top of the ratings during that time. I talked with the 64-year-old broadcaster this week about his final days on the air in Baltimore.
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BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2011
For every powerhouse like Google, there are dozens of Internet companies that flop. Still, a decade after the dot-com bubble that burst, there is no shortage of investors trying to get a piece of the next online blockbuster. Lately, much of the hype has centered on social media. While many of the big names — Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter — may sell stock publicly through IPOs one day, they have been raising capital by selling stakes to institutional investors, venture capitalists and wealthy investors.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
While Millennial Media pioneered mobile advertising, it now competes with online household names Google and Facebook, which dominate the $18 billion market. To Millennial CEO Michael Barrett, that's a good sign. But it's also meant a rough start to Barrett's tenure at the Baltimore-based firm. He took over in January for Paul Palmieri, who founded and led Millennial from its days as a startup in 2006 to its debut as a public company in 2012. As the company's stock tumbled amid a disappointing earnings report last month, Barrett acknowledged on an investor conference call there were challenges ahead and outlined a plan to address them.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 13, 1999
NEW YORK -- Five of the world's largest media companies are threatening to sue TiVo Inc., Replay Networks Inc. and other makers of so-called TV replay devices unless they agree to obtain licenses to use network programming.Time Warner Inc., Walt Disney Co., News Corp., CBS Corp. and Discovery Communications Inc. said yesterday that they formed a coalition to protect TV copyrights by forcing the device makers to negotiate and acquire program licenses.The devices, or personal video recorders, let users create a lineup of their favorite shows that can be digitally recorded and then viewed anytime.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
Don Scott will sign off for the last time Friday morning at WJZ -TV after 40 years at the station. Tens of thousands of Baltimore viewers have started their day with him for the more than three decades that he's been at the station's morning anchor desk. That's a run not likely to be duplicated by many in the new media world. And WJZ has consistently finished at or near the top of the ratings during that time. I talked with the 64-year-old broadcaster this week about his final days on the air in Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2012
T. Rowe Price Group's stake in Facebook Inc. more than tripled in value as the social networking giant went public Friday. At the close of the market Friday, T. Rowe's investment in Facebook was valued at $695.8 million. The Baltimore-based mutual fund company invested $190.5 million in Facebook last spring. Shares of Facebook finished trading at $38.23 — just 23 cents above the initial public offering price set by the company and its underwriters. T. Rowe holds 18.2 million Facebook shares, which are spread across 80 mutual funds and accounts controlled by the investment company, according to Facebook's IPO registration statement filed earlier this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2012
A couple of controversial, Internet piracy bills in Congress have pit the tech industry against the music business, even independents. In a statement sent out early Wednesday afternoon, A2IM, the largest trade organization of independent musicians and labels, was the latest to support the Stop Online Piracy and the Protect Intellectual Property acts, despite that some high-profile indie musicians, like Baltimore's Wye Oak , are protesting the...
NEWS
By Jenn Topper and S. Derek Turner | November 6, 2013
So far this year, 223 local TV stations have changed hands. This is the biggest wave of media consolidation ever - and it's all happening in small and mid-level markets, involving companies most people have never heard of. Leading this wave is Hunt Valley-based Sinclair Broadcast Group. Sinclair alone is behind seven deals this year, including a $985-million deal to buy nine stations from Allbritton Communications. But it's not alone; other media companies are also racing to gobble up stations.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
Media companies routinely play chicken in negotiations over such issues as retransmission fees and bundling, terms that mean next to nothing to their customers until one of the companies they subscribe to lets things get out of hand. Usually, that never happens. But it did at midnight Tuesday with DirecTV and Viacom, which resulted in the satellite TV provider's 20 million customers being without such Viacom-owned channels as Comedy Central, MTV, Nickelodeon, BET and VH1. In all, 17 channels were lost at midnight with shows that feature such performers as Jon Stewart, Stephen Colbert, SpongeBob SquarePants and Snooki.
NEWS
By Jenn Topper and S. Derek Turner | November 6, 2013
So far this year, 223 local TV stations have changed hands. This is the biggest wave of media consolidation ever - and it's all happening in small and mid-level markets, involving companies most people have never heard of. Leading this wave is Hunt Valley-based Sinclair Broadcast Group. Sinclair alone is behind seven deals this year, including a $985-million deal to buy nine stations from Allbritton Communications. But it's not alone; other media companies are also racing to gobble up stations.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2013
When Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. completes three deals announced in the past two months, it will own more television stations across the country than any other company. The Hunt Valley company will operate 134 stations in 69 markets, reaching more than a third of all U.S. homes with televisions. It will have more than doubled in size in about two years, and that's presuming it doesn't broker any more acquisitions. It still won't own stations in megamarkets such as New York or Los Angeles, but that's part of its strategy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2012
What an ignorant, dishonest and pathetic response to Sandy Hook today from the National Rifle Association. As a media critic, I will limit myself to the disingenuous attack on the media from Wayne LaPierre, chief executive of the organization. Of course, it's a shameless attempt to avoid accepting any responsibility by his organization. But in the interest of a sane discussion about media violence -- rather than the demagogued, crazy-right-wing-paranoid speechifying of LaPierre -- some social science research, facts and context need to be presented.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | October 18, 2012
I was at the Mid-Atlantic Marketing Summit this morning in downtown Baltimore, where I caught the Baltimore Ravens digital marketing guru, Michelle Andres, talking about how the NFL team handles the Internet, social media and apps. In short, the soup-to-nuts digital experience for both players and fans of the Ravens franchise. Sure, the team is covered by a lot of traditional media outlets, including us at The Baltimore Sun. But they've also become a digital marketing and publishing powerhouse in their own right.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2012
With three nights of record ratings, NBC's coverage of the London Summer Olympics is winning on the prime-time TV front. But it looks to be losing in major ways in the world of social media, as a rising tide of complaints about the network's policy of tape-delaying major events - such as those involving Michael Phelps - appear on Twitter, accompanied by such hashtags as #nbcfail and #nbcdelayed. The disconnect between NBC's success on TV and failure in social media highlights not only the landmark transformation taking place in media these days, but also the radical change in audience expectations and behavior, analysts say. Like many media companies, NBC has tried to lure viewers to its digital platforms with promises of providing information 24/7, whenever the consumer wants it. But now, the network is feeling the heat in social media for not feeding the very on-demand appetite it helped create “This kind of reaction to tape delay in Olympics coverage has always been there.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
Media companies routinely play chicken in negotiations over such issues as retransmission fees and bundling, terms that mean next to nothing to their customers until one of the companies they subscribe to lets things get out of hand. Usually, that never happens. But it did at midnight Tuesday with DirecTV and Viacom, which resulted in the satellite TV provider's 20 million customers being without such Viacom-owned channels as Comedy Central, MTV, Nickelodeon, BET and VH1. In all, 17 channels were lost at midnight with shows that feature such performers as Jon Stewart, Stephen Colbert, SpongeBob SquarePants and Snooki.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2012
What an ignorant, dishonest and pathetic response to Sandy Hook today from the National Rifle Association. As a media critic, I will limit myself to the disingenuous attack on the media from Wayne LaPierre, chief executive of the organization. Of course, it's a shameless attempt to avoid accepting any responsibility by his organization. But in the interest of a sane discussion about media violence -- rather than the demagogued, crazy-right-wing-paranoid speechifying of LaPierre -- some social science research, facts and context need to be presented.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2012
With three nights of record ratings, NBC's coverage of the London Summer Olympics is winning on the prime-time TV front. But it looks to be losing in major ways in the world of social media, as a rising tide of complaints about the network's policy of tape-delaying major events - such as those involving Michael Phelps - appear on Twitter, accompanied by such hashtags as #nbcfail and #nbcdelayed. The disconnect between NBC's success on TV and failure in social media highlights not only the landmark transformation taking place in media these days, but also the radical change in audience expectations and behavior, analysts say. Like many media companies, NBC has tried to lure viewers to its digital platforms with promises of providing information 24/7, whenever the consumer wants it. But now, the network is feeling the heat in social media for not feeding the very on-demand appetite it helped create “This kind of reaction to tape delay in Olympics coverage has always been there.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2012
T. Rowe Price Group's stake in Facebook Inc. more than tripled in value as the social networking giant went public Friday. At the close of the market Friday, T. Rowe's investment in Facebook was valued at $695.8 million. The Baltimore-based mutual fund company invested $190.5 million in Facebook last spring. Shares of Facebook finished trading at $38.23 — just 23 cents above the initial public offering price set by the company and its underwriters. T. Rowe holds 18.2 million Facebook shares, which are spread across 80 mutual funds and accounts controlled by the investment company, according to Facebook's IPO registration statement filed earlier this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2012
A couple of controversial, Internet piracy bills in Congress have pit the tech industry against the music business, even independents. In a statement sent out early Wednesday afternoon, A2IM, the largest trade organization of independent musicians and labels, was the latest to support the Stop Online Piracy and the Protect Intellectual Property acts, despite that some high-profile indie musicians, like Baltimore's Wye Oak , are protesting the...
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