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Media Circus

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NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | September 28, 1994
Sometimes it's hard to tell what information-seeking Americans really want from the countless voices they lump together as "the media."On the one hand, we have the TV ratings that clearly tell us the O.J. Simpson murder trial is still the hottest of news stories. It is bigger than Haiti, health care or even Monday Night Football.Whether it is the trial itself, or the droning of hired legal experts, the panting TV tabloids, or Larry King and the other talk shows, if the subject is Simpson, the ratings soar.
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NEWS
December 10, 2006
Don't put Brown through media circus THE ISSUE: -- The contract of Columbia Association President Maggie J. Brown expires in April. Half of the board members want "a different style of management," according to Phil Marcus, board member from Kings Contrivance. They think Brown should not be given a contract extension of more than one year. What do you think? Maggie Brown is a fine and decent person who has served our community with great distinction for many years. The CA board has every right to do what they want with her contract.
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NEWS
April 6, 1998
EVEN though the Ruthann Aron murder-for-hire case ended in a mistrial, another aspect of it went as smoothly as could be imagined. The case did not become a media circus inside the Montgomery County Courthouse.Circuit Court Judge Paul A. McGuckian, Administrative Judge Paul Weinstein and Sheriff Raymond M. Kight deserve praise.They understood the needs of the media to cover the trial of a former U.S. Senate candidate accused of plotting to murder her husband and an attorney, while ensuring that the regular business of the courthouse proceeded without interruption.
NEWS
By Stephanie Simon and Ralph Vartabedian and Stephanie Simon and Ralph Vartabedian,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 29, 2006
BOULDER, Colo. -- Prosecutors abruptly dropped their case yesterday against John Mark Karr, the itinerant schoolteacher arrested in the decade-old murder of JonBenet Ramsey, saying that his DNA did not match blood recovered from the crime scene. Less than two weeks after flying him from Thailand to face charges - an event that set off an international media circus - Boulder District Attorney Mary Lacy closed the case, acknowledging that she could find no evidence that he was in Boulder on the night of the killing.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 10, 1998
WASHINGTON -- A federal judge, reacting to fears voiced by President Clinton's lawyers of a "media circus," put off yesterday her plan to release scores of sealed documents in Paula Corbin Jones' sexual misconduct case against Clinton.As a result, hundreds of pages of never-disclosed papers -- many of them likely to be embarrassing to the president -- will not become public Monday, as U.S. District Judge Susan Webber Wright had ordered earlier.Wright said yesterday that she would not release any of the papers for at least two weeks, while she studies a plea by the president's lawyers that she reconsider the issue.
SPORTS
By Gil Lebreton and Gil Lebreton,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | January 22, 1993
At the Super Bowl in Tampa, Fla., two years ago, Downtown Julie Brown, of MTV fame, showed up on Photo Day wearing a minidress that was barely longer than her earrings.Now, that's a distraction.At the Super Bowl in New Orleans in 1986, a TV helicopter hovered too close to the Bears' closed practice session. Chicago quarterback Jim McMahon dropped his pants and showed them the moon over Miami.Now, that's a distraction.At Pontiac, Mich., in 1982, it was so cold during Super Bowl week that the time/temperature clock outside NFL hotel headquarters kept blinking, "1 ... 1 ... 1 ..."
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2004
After the Tet offensive of 1968 shattered the rosy view that many Americans had of the prospects for a U.S. victory in Vietnam, CBS news anchor Walter Cronkite went to that troubled land. On Feb. 27, just after returning, Cronkite ended his newscast with an unusual analytical soliloquy that he described as "speculative, personal and subjective." He concluded that the then-controversial proposal of negotiating with the Viet Cong and North Vietnamese was the only way out of a war that was "mired in a stalemate."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | July 23, 1997
One of last season's strongest episodes of the woefully underappreciated "Law & Order" (10 p.m.-11 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) gets a repeat airing on NBC tonight.Sam Waterston shines in the conclusion of a three-parter that had the detectives and prosecutors scurrying between the East and West Coasts to find the killer of a female movie executive whose body is fished out of a New York river.Tonight's conclusion offers Waterston plenty of chances to bemoan the media circus the trial has become (any similarities to the O. J. case are purely intentional)
NEWS
By John Balzar and John Balzar,Los Angeles Times | May 23, 1993
MEDIA CIRCUS: THE TROUBLE WITH AMERICA'S NEWSPAPERS.Howard Kurtz.Times Books.378 pages. $25. Say, for instance, another of those goofy, ghastly runaway news events is under way. Maybe it's a doomsday cult, or a tyke caught deep down a drainpipe, or a political mischief-maker named David Duke, or maybe a Gennifer with a "G."So the editors gather after a few days and pull on their chins thoughtfully, and one of them begins, "You know, this thing is being overblown to high heaven."Another pipes up: "Hey, good story!
NEWS
By Charles Lane | July 24, 1998
I CAN'T think of any logical argument to refute Ken Starr's claim that the president should not be able to engage in raw illegalities in front of his Secret Service bodyguards, safe in the knowledge that they can't be compelled to testify. Mr. Starr was also right that no court or statute had previously recognized the Secret Service's claim of a "protective function privilege."("A constitutional absurdity," harrumphed Judge Laurence Silberman of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and David Zurawik and Mary Carole McCauley and David Zurawik,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2005
From live updates on the news networks to nightly re-enactments on the cable channel E!, stories about the Michael Jackson trial have been as difficult to avoid this season as Law and Order spinoffs. But this week, reports about a court ruling in the trial appeared on the front pages of major American newspapers, causing heated debates in newsrooms nationwide about whether a news organization's primary responsibility is to inform its audience about the issues of the day or to entertain them.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2005
ON JAN. 30, 1925, Floyd Collins was negotiating a tight spot in a Kentucky cave that he was exploring when a rock slid onto his foot. Collins couldn't move. Eventually, relatives located him and rescue efforts began. For two weeks, workers struggled to get Collins out of Sand Cave. Efforts to remove the rock only lodged it more securely. Reporters descended on the place in droves as the story captivated the nation. William Burke Miller of the Louisville Courier-Journal went down into the cave and interviewed the trapped Collins.
NEWS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2005
WASHINGTON - The line started to form at 6 a.m. outside the hearing room at the Rayburn Office Building, reaffirming the drawing power of Major League Baseball, even in one of its darkest hours. There were fans and Capitol Hill interns and visiting students, all hoping to get a glimpse of the five current and former major league players who were scheduled to testify in front of a congressional committee on the scope of the sport's steroid problem. The high drama of Mark McGwire and Jose Canseco brought together to answer questions about baseball's dirtiest secret was too much to resist for John Wertman of Alexandria, Va., who showed up in a green Boston Red Sox cap and claimed to be a longtime Canseco fan. "They'll probably put [Curt]
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2004
After the Tet offensive of 1968 shattered the rosy view that many Americans had of the prospects for a U.S. victory in Vietnam, CBS news anchor Walter Cronkite went to that troubled land. On Feb. 27, just after returning, Cronkite ended his newscast with an unusual analytical soliloquy that he described as "speculative, personal and subjective." He concluded that the then-controversial proposal of negotiating with the Viet Cong and North Vietnamese was the only way out of a war that was "mired in a stalemate."
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | January 24, 2001
TAMPA, Fla. - Ray Lewis had a chance to make the rest of his life a lot easier. All he had to do was give the Super Bowl media what they wanted yesterday. A dash of humility. A pinch of remorse. A pang of regret over his role in the unsolved double homicide that occurred after last year's Super Bowl in Atlanta. He wouldn't do it. "I'm not here to please the country," Lewis said during an hour-long session with reporters at Raymond James Stadium. Too bad. It wouldn't have taken much from him to drain a lot of the emotion from a tragic, volatile issue that lacks resolution and, thus, continues to simmer, casting a shadow over Lewis' on-field magic.
NEWS
By Jim Haner and Jim Haner,SUN STAFF | May 28, 1999
George A. Dangerfield Jr., a convicted drug dealer described by city housing officials as one of Baltimore's worst scofflaw landlords, agreed yesterday to pay up to $100,000 in damages to an impoverished couple that he illegally evicted from their home.The settlement ended a lawsuit by former tenants Eric Holmes, 43, and his fiancee, Rosetta Bailey, 38, who were homeless for nearly two years after the incident.The couple charged that Dangerfield ordered a group of thugs to break down their door, drag them from their bed and cast them into the street in their underwear on a hot summer night two years ago as the landlord leaned against his Rolls-Royce, laughing.
NEWS
December 10, 2006
Don't put Brown through media circus THE ISSUE: -- The contract of Columbia Association President Maggie J. Brown expires in April. Half of the board members want "a different style of management," according to Phil Marcus, board member from Kings Contrivance. They think Brown should not be given a contract extension of more than one year. What do you think? Maggie Brown is a fine and decent person who has served our community with great distinction for many years. The CA board has every right to do what they want with her contract.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | January 24, 2001
TAMPA, Fla. - Ray Lewis had a chance to make the rest of his life a lot easier. All he had to do was give the Super Bowl media what they wanted yesterday. A dash of humility. A pinch of remorse. A pang of regret over his role in the unsolved double homicide that occurred after last year's Super Bowl in Atlanta. He wouldn't do it. "I'm not here to please the country," Lewis said during an hour-long session with reporters at Raymond James Stadium. Too bad. It wouldn't have taken much from him to drain a lot of the emotion from a tragic, volatile issue that lacks resolution and, thus, continues to simmer, casting a shadow over Lewis' on-field magic.
NEWS
By Charles Lane | July 24, 1998
I CAN'T think of any logical argument to refute Ken Starr's claim that the president should not be able to engage in raw illegalities in front of his Secret Service bodyguards, safe in the knowledge that they can't be compelled to testify. Mr. Starr was also right that no court or statute had previously recognized the Secret Service's claim of a "protective function privilege."("A constitutional absurdity," harrumphed Judge Laurence Silberman of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 10, 1998
WASHINGTON -- A federal judge, reacting to fears voiced by President Clinton's lawyers of a "media circus," put off yesterday her plan to release scores of sealed documents in Paula Corbin Jones' sexual misconduct case against Clinton.As a result, hundreds of pages of never-disclosed papers -- many of them likely to be embarrassing to the president -- will not become public Monday, as U.S. District Judge Susan Webber Wright had ordered earlier.Wright said yesterday that she would not release any of the papers for at least two weeks, while she studies a plea by the president's lawyers that she reconsider the issue.
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