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NEWS
January 31, 1994
Nearly 30 years after two all-white juries failed to convict admitted white supremacist Byron De La Beckwith for the 1963 murder of Mississippi civil rights worker Medgar Evers, Mr. De La Beckwith is back in court facing a third trial on the same charges.Mr. Evers, the 37-year-old field secretary for the Mississippi chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, had just returned home from a meeting when he was ambushed in the driveway of his Jackson home in the early morning hours of June 12, 1963.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | July 1, 2007
So, what's going on with you? Nothing much? Wish I could say the same. As you may know if you've seen CNN or read the paper, yours truly has lately been the target of death threats and harassment from the ranks of the not-so-tightly wrapped. This, after a column last month about the torture murder of a young white couple, allegedly by five black people. My column took on white supremacists and far-right bloggers who contend that this "genocide" - their word - goes unremarked by news media too politically correct to report black-on-white crime.
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NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | February 8, 1995
Myrlie Evers-Williams, the widow of an NAACP martyr, declared her candidacy yesterday for the chairmanship of the troubled civil rights organization.Ms. Evers-Williams poses the strongest challenge yet to Chairman William F. Gibson, whom NAACP critics accuse of lavish spending and financial mismanagement. The Baltimore-based National Association for the Advancement of Colored People has a $4 million deficit."We need new leadership," said Ms. Evers-Williams, a longtime NAACP activist whose first husband, Medgar Evers, the group's Mississippi field secretary, was shot to death in 1963 by a white supremacist.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun Staff | July 10, 2005
Civil Rights The Autobiography of Medgar Evers Edited by Myrlie Evers-Williams and Manning Marable. Basic Civitas Books. 352 pages. In the preface, Myrlie Evers-Williams describes her dismay that today's young people rarely recognize the name of her slain husband, with some even mistaking him for a Negro League baseball player. She makes clear that this exhaustive volume chronicling the life and death of her civil rights leader husband is intended to set the record straight. The Autobiography of Medgar Evers etches a rightful place in civil rights history for a man who was content to toil in the shadows while other giants of the movement, such as Martin Luther King Jr. and Ralph Abernathy, worked the spotlight.
NEWS
By Story by Mary Corey and M. Dion Thompson and Story by Mary Corey and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | March 29, 1998
As Van Evers squeezed beside the freshly unearthed casket for the six-hour ride, one thought consumed him: He was going to see his father.He never believed he'd have this chance. Three years old when his father, Medgar Evers, was killed, Van had only faint memories of a man leaving bubble gum cigars on his bunk bed. After the murder, he would pick up the phone and ask, "Have you seen my daddy?"Now, nearly 30 years later, the body was being brought to Albany, N.Y., from Arlington National Cemetery for an autopsy to bolster a case against the accused killer.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane | February 28, 1994
FORGIVE me if I don't lose any sleep over the constitutional rights of Byron De La Beckwith.It took three trials for a jury to find De La Beckwith guilty of killing Medgar Evers in Jackson, Miss., June 12, 1963. Many legal experts believe the conviction will be reversed on the grounds that he was denied his constitutional right to a speedy trial.But if anyone is overdrawn at the Bank of Constitutional Rights, it's one Byron De La Beckwith. Those shedding tears now over some perceived violation of his rights would do well to dwell on this.
FEATURES
By Judith Bolton-Fasman and Judith Bolton-Fasman,Special to The Sun | March 29, 1994
Before the assassinations of John Kennedy, Malcolm X, Martin Luther King and Robert Kennedy, there was the murder of Medgar Evers.Evers' civil rights activism as field secretary for the NAACP in Jackson, Miss., had attracted the disdain of Southern segregationists. He was killed by a single bullet in the back on a June night in 1963 in his own driveway. Ironically, Evers' death galvanized the civil rights movement and helped to fulfill some of his greatest aspirations. It also recast the assassin, Byron De La Beckwith, from an eccentric segregationist into a violent racist.
NEWS
May 18, 1995
The inauguration of Myrlie Evers-Williams as the new head of the NAACP doesn't mean all of its problems are suddenly solved. Not only must she get the NAACP back on firm financial footing, she must take steps to make the nation's oldest civil rights organization relevant in the '90s.Ironically, that is to some degree the same task her first husband, Medgar Evers, had trying to demonstrate the relevance of the NAACP in Mississippi when Martin Luther King Jr.'s upstart Southern Christian Leadership Conference was receiving more attention.
NEWS
February 13, 1998
THE DECISION by NAACP board Chairwoman Myrlie Evers-Williams not to seek re-election this month is disappointing but not surprising.She was reluctant to seek the post three years ago, knowing her husband Walter Edward Williams had terminal prostate cancer.But Mr. Williams, who has since died, persuaded his wife that she was the right person to lead the NAACP, just as he had convinced her to pursue the retrial that after 31 years led to a conviction and long prison term in the 1963 murder of her first husband, Mississippi civil rights leader Medgar Evers.
NEWS
By Harold Jackson | June 12, 1995
GHOSTS OF MISSISSIPPI: THE MURDER OF MEDGAR EVERS, THE TRIALS OF BYRON DE LA BECKWITH, AND THE HAUNTING OF THE NEW SOUTH. By Maryanne Vollers. Little, Brown and Company. Index. 411 pages. $24.95.I VIVIDLY REMEMBER the day Sixteenth Street BaptisChurch was bombed in Birmingham. I was 10 years old and hadn't gone to church that morning. Playing near the back door of our apartment, I heard the blast from less than five miles away. I didn't know what it was and didn't think much about it at the time.
NEWS
March 29, 1998
The stories of the Evers, King and Shabazz families are entwined with the decades-long struggle to intergrate American society. Over the next two days, the landmark events of those years will be chronicled.1951Dec. 24: Medgar Evers marries Myrlie Beasley in Vicksburg, Miss.1953June 18: Martin Luther King Jr. marries Coretta Scott in Marion, Ala.June 30: Darrell Kenyatta Evers is born.1954Jan. 11: Evers files an application with the all-white University of Mississippi Law School. Thurgood Marshall acts as his attorney.
NEWS
By Story by Mary Corey and M. Dion Thompson and Story by Mary Corey and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | March 29, 1998
As Van Evers squeezed beside the freshly unearthed casket for the six-hour ride, one thought consumed him: He was going to see his father.He never believed he'd have this chance. Three years old when his father, Medgar Evers, was killed, Van had only faint memories of a man leaving bubble gum cigars on his bunk bed. After the murder, he would pick up the phone and ask, "Have you seen my daddy?"Now, nearly 30 years later, the body was being brought to Albany, N.Y., from Arlington National Cemetery for an autopsy to bolster a case against the accused killer.
NEWS
February 13, 1998
THE DECISION by NAACP board Chairwoman Myrlie Evers-Williams not to seek re-election this month is disappointing but not surprising.She was reluctant to seek the post three years ago, knowing her husband Walter Edward Williams had terminal prostate cancer.But Mr. Williams, who has since died, persuaded his wife that she was the right person to lead the NAACP, just as he had convinced her to pursue the retrial that after 31 years led to a conviction and long prison term in the 1963 murder of her first husband, Mississippi civil rights leader Medgar Evers.
NEWS
By Harold Jackson | June 12, 1995
GHOSTS OF MISSISSIPPI: THE MURDER OF MEDGAR EVERS, THE TRIALS OF BYRON DE LA BECKWITH, AND THE HAUNTING OF THE NEW SOUTH. By Maryanne Vollers. Little, Brown and Company. Index. 411 pages. $24.95.I VIVIDLY REMEMBER the day Sixteenth Street BaptisChurch was bombed in Birmingham. I was 10 years old and hadn't gone to church that morning. Playing near the back door of our apartment, I heard the blast from less than five miles away. I didn't know what it was and didn't think much about it at the time.
NEWS
May 18, 1995
The inauguration of Myrlie Evers-Williams as the new head of the NAACP doesn't mean all of its problems are suddenly solved. Not only must she get the NAACP back on firm financial footing, she must take steps to make the nation's oldest civil rights organization relevant in the '90s.Ironically, that is to some degree the same task her first husband, Medgar Evers, had trying to demonstrate the relevance of the NAACP in Mississippi when Martin Luther King Jr.'s upstart Southern Christian Leadership Conference was receiving more attention.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 18, 1995
NEW YORK -- In a sign of their discontent, NAACP members have elected two vocal critics of Chairman William F. Gibson to the civil rights group's national board of directors.Civil rights activist Julian Bond and former NAACP President Hazel N. Dukes, running on an anti-Gibson slate, finished first and second, respectively, in the election of seven at-large directors to the 64-member board. The voting took place at NAACP branches across the country in December, and the sealed ballots were tallied here late Thursday.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 18, 1995
NEW YORK -- In a sign of their discontent, NAACP members have elected two vocal critics of Chairman William F. Gibson to the civil rights group's national board of directors.Civil rights activist Julian Bond and former NAACP President Hazel N. Dukes, running on an anti-Gibson slate, finished first and second, respectively, in the election of seven at-large directors to the 64-member board. The voting took place at NAACP branches across the country in December, and the sealed ballots were tallied here late Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun Staff | July 10, 2005
Civil Rights The Autobiography of Medgar Evers Edited by Myrlie Evers-Williams and Manning Marable. Basic Civitas Books. 352 pages. In the preface, Myrlie Evers-Williams describes her dismay that today's young people rarely recognize the name of her slain husband, with some even mistaking him for a Negro League baseball player. She makes clear that this exhaustive volume chronicling the life and death of her civil rights leader husband is intended to set the record straight. The Autobiography of Medgar Evers etches a rightful place in civil rights history for a man who was content to toil in the shadows while other giants of the movement, such as Martin Luther King Jr. and Ralph Abernathy, worked the spotlight.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | February 8, 1995
Myrlie Evers-Williams, the widow of an NAACP martyr, declared her candidacy yesterday for the chairmanship of the troubled civil rights organization.Ms. Evers-Williams poses the strongest challenge yet to Chairman William F. Gibson, whom NAACP critics accuse of lavish spending and financial mismanagement. The Baltimore-based National Association for the Advancement of Colored People has a $4 million deficit."We need new leadership," said Ms. Evers-Williams, a longtime NAACP activist whose first husband, Medgar Evers, the group's Mississippi field secretary, was shot to death in 1963 by a white supremacist.
FEATURES
By Judith Bolton-Fasman and Judith Bolton-Fasman,Special to The Sun | March 29, 1994
Before the assassinations of John Kennedy, Malcolm X, Martin Luther King and Robert Kennedy, there was the murder of Medgar Evers.Evers' civil rights activism as field secretary for the NAACP in Jackson, Miss., had attracted the disdain of Southern segregationists. He was killed by a single bullet in the back on a June night in 1963 in his own driveway. Ironically, Evers' death galvanized the civil rights movement and helped to fulfill some of his greatest aspirations. It also recast the assassin, Byron De La Beckwith, from an eccentric segregationist into a violent racist.
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