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By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | March 21, 1991
"Is Medea's crime Medea's glory?" asks Irish playwright Brendan Kennelly in his important new version of Euripides' riveting classic drama of revenge.With the American premiere of this unique production of "Medea," the UMBC Theatre Department continues its admirable policy of presenting outstanding, innovative experimental works.The most potent example of the truth of the adage, "Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned," Medea is the first completely drawn female character of theater and she expresses the first dramatic protest against the lot imposed on her by the ruling class of men.Like Euripides, who scripted the work in 431 B.C., Kennelly had the quandary of making this woman's terrible acts seem plausible.
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Sports Digest | September 28, 2014
Laurel Park Dreamsgonewild upsets Ben's Cat In a blanket finish, Dreamsgonewild ran down the speed and held off Ben's Cat to win the $100,000 Laurel Dash, the last of six turf stakes Saturday at Laurel Park. The 12-race card featured five open stakes races on the turf and the Jameela Stakes for Maryland-bred and/or -sired runners. Dreamsgonewild, a speedy son of Freud who was ridden by Trevor McCarthy and trained by Bruce Alexander , covered the 6-furlong distance in 1 minute, 7.99 seconds, just a few tenths off the course record of 1:07.29.
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NEWS
By Diane Cameron | May 11, 2008
If productivity was down in your workplace last week, you can blame your mother. All across the Baltimore area, employees lingered through their lunch hour in card stores, reading and sighing. Buying a Mother's Day card is not easy. For some, the card that says, "Mom, thanks for being perfect," is fine, but for the rest of us, with complicated mothers and complicated relationships, the search for the right message is tough. But even as children (of all ages) struggle to summarize their maternal relationship in a card, those on the receiving end have mixed feelings too. Most mothers know that we don't come close to the platitudes in those greeting cards.
NEWS
By Diane Cameron | May 11, 2008
If productivity was down in your workplace last week, you can blame your mother. All across the Baltimore area, employees lingered through their lunch hour in card stores, reading and sighing. Buying a Mother's Day card is not easy. For some, the card that says, "Mom, thanks for being perfect," is fine, but for the rest of us, with complicated mothers and complicated relationships, the search for the right message is tough. But even as children (of all ages) struggle to summarize their maternal relationship in a card, those on the receiving end have mixed feelings too. Most mothers know that we don't come close to the platitudes in those greeting cards.
NEWS
April 9, 1993
"Medea," the Greek tragedy by Euripides, will be presented by the Western Maryland College theater department in six performances, beginning April 23 on the Understage in Alumni Hall.Other performances will be held on April 24-25 and April 29-May 1. All shows will begin at 8 p.m.Written in 431 B.C. during one of the most expansive periods in Western thought, "Medea" was taken from the Greek myth about a sorceress whose amorality and treachery destroy her family.The tragedy, among the timeless works of literature, has influenced novelists and dramatists over the centuries.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer | April 23, 1993
Medea: A woman scorned?Yes, and a lot more."Jason marries a younger woman, and she has power," said Sierra Hurtt, the senior theater major portraying the title character in Western Maryland College's final production of the school year. "[Medea] feels used. She remembers when she was young and alluring and had the riches her husband wanted, but now, he's gone. She's hurt."WMC's theater department will present six performances of the classical Greek tragedy "Medea," beginning tonight on the Understage in Alumni Hall.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | November 9, 2002
Actress Fiona Shaw has a way of making a small, disarming "hah!" just as the character she is playing is about to make an incendiary announcement. It has the effect of making Medea's plans to murder her children sound almost reasonable - at least, for the second it takes for your brain to register what she just said. Laughter is by its very nature dispassionate, so a person with a sense of humor can't help but seem rational. That chuckle is key to blinding the local women of Corinth (not to mention the audience)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 25, 2005
Diary of a Mad Black Woman is an uneasy mix of comedy, drama and good old-fashioned religious fervor. The humor, honed by writer-actor Tyler Perry during years on the stage in urban venues throughout the country, is plentiful, but the drama is obvious, mawkish and too sincere for its own good. Still, the movie is so unapologetically suffused with compassion and good feelings that its shortcomings are hard not to forgive. Diary is the story of poor Helen McCarter (Woman, Thou Art Loosed's Kimberly Elise)
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | March 10, 1991
Reinterpretation of 'Medea' slated at UMBCEuripides' "Medea," as reinterpreted by Irish poet Brendan Kennelly, will be produced by the theater department of the University of Maryland Baltimore County at 8 p.m. Thursday to rTC Saturday and again March 19-23 in the UMBC Theatre.Directed by Sam McCready, the production is mounted in and around a large pool in the center of the stage. Tickets are $6, with a $2 preview at 8 p.m. Wednesday. For more information call 455-2476.@ Marta Renzi and the Project Company will perform Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and next Sunday at 4 p.m. at the Baltimore Museum of Art as part of the Dance on the Edge series presented by the Downtown Dance Company.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna Rifkind and By Donna Rifkind,Special to the Sun | November 10, 2002
Why our town existed, no one knew; how it had started, no one remembered." From such inauspicious beginnings comes the story of Miriam, the teen-age narrator of Your Mouth Is Lovely, (Ecco, 368 pages, $25.95), Nancy Richler's second novel. Set in a woebegone shtetl on the edge of a swamp in pre-revolutionary Russia, the book begins with Miriam's birth to an emotionally disturbed mother who drowns herself the very next day. Little Miriam is raised by her sharp-tongued stepmother, Tsila, a skilled dressmaker who yearns to escape the backwardness and poverty of their marshy village.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 25, 2005
Diary of a Mad Black Woman is an uneasy mix of comedy, drama and good old-fashioned religious fervor. The humor, honed by writer-actor Tyler Perry during years on the stage in urban venues throughout the country, is plentiful, but the drama is obvious, mawkish and too sincere for its own good. Still, the movie is so unapologetically suffused with compassion and good feelings that its shortcomings are hard not to forgive. Diary is the story of poor Helen McCarter (Woman, Thou Art Loosed's Kimberly Elise)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna Rifkind and By Donna Rifkind,Special to the Sun | November 10, 2002
Why our town existed, no one knew; how it had started, no one remembered." From such inauspicious beginnings comes the story of Miriam, the teen-age narrator of Your Mouth Is Lovely, (Ecco, 368 pages, $25.95), Nancy Richler's second novel. Set in a woebegone shtetl on the edge of a swamp in pre-revolutionary Russia, the book begins with Miriam's birth to an emotionally disturbed mother who drowns herself the very next day. Little Miriam is raised by her sharp-tongued stepmother, Tsila, a skilled dressmaker who yearns to escape the backwardness and poverty of their marshy village.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | November 9, 2002
Actress Fiona Shaw has a way of making a small, disarming "hah!" just as the character she is playing is about to make an incendiary announcement. It has the effect of making Medea's plans to murder her children sound almost reasonable - at least, for the second it takes for your brain to register what she just said. Laughter is by its very nature dispassionate, so a person with a sense of humor can't help but seem rational. That chuckle is key to blinding the local women of Corinth (not to mention the audience)
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 7, 2002
Shakespeare created a number of strong, smart female characters, and Helena in All's Well That Ends Well would appear to be one of them. She goes after what she wants - marriage to a nobleman named Bertram - with unflagging determination and no shortage of stratagems. And, as the title indicates, she gets her prize in the end. Considering the nature of that prize, however, you have to wonder how smart she really is. Bertram is an impudent, spoiled, rich boy who openly disdains lovely Helena, and there's little reason to believe he's had a true change of heart by the final curtain.
NEWS
By Mark Fritz and Mark Fritz,Los Angeles Times | July 2, 1999
NEW YORK -- Suppose you were rambling around the Internet and stumbled across a Web site devoted to the works of Euripides, the ancient Greek dramatist. Maybe you'd think this was the obscure hangout of professors exchanging ideas about things written on scrolls.Well, you would be wrong. You would find typical yet tightly wound college students, burdened with homework, pressed for time, cheating their hearts out with ingenuous amorality. You'd find scholars such as Jeremy, whose last name is being withheld to spare him a scowl from his instructor, in deep research.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 22, 1998
SEAN MACTIRE, dressed in black jeans and a blue denim shirt and with his pony tail, frizzled hair and mustache making him look like a throwback to the hippie days of the late 1960s, sat in his chair and scoffed.Men do not, Mactire insisted, commit more violent crimes than women. Violent crime is a raceless, genderless phenomenon that is linked more to mental illness, said Mactire, author of several books who has worked with brain injury survivors for more than 10 years.Women, Mactire believes, are every bit as deadly as men. I'm skeptical, but I agree to meet him for lunch anyway.
NEWS
By Mark Fritz and Mark Fritz,Los Angeles Times | July 2, 1999
NEW YORK -- Suppose you were rambling around the Internet and stumbled across a Web site devoted to the works of Euripides, the ancient Greek dramatist. Maybe you'd think this was the obscure hangout of professors exchanging ideas about things written on scrolls.Well, you would be wrong. You would find typical yet tightly wound college students, burdened with homework, pressed for time, cheating their hearts out with ingenuous amorality. You'd find scholars such as Jeremy, whose last name is being withheld to spare him a scowl from his instructor, in deep research.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | April 9, 1993
A new and exciting option for theatergoers is about to appear on the Annapolis scene: Theatre in the Woods is coming!Theatre in the Woods is the brainchild of the gifted director T. G. Cooper, the Howard University professor whose Pamoja troupe will become the theater's ensemble in residence.Performances will be Thursday through Sunday evenings and Saturday matinees at the picturesque Unitarian Church set in a wooded lot off Dubois Road in Annapolis.The new theater will open May 27 with "Bojangles," Cooper's own musical docudrama on the life of the real Mr. Bojangles, Bill Robinson.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer | April 23, 1993
Medea: A woman scorned?Yes, and a lot more."Jason marries a younger woman, and she has power," said Sierra Hurtt, the senior theater major portraying the title character in Western Maryland College's final production of the school year. "[Medea] feels used. She remembers when she was young and alluring and had the riches her husband wanted, but now, he's gone. She's hurt."WMC's theater department will present six performances of the classical Greek tragedy "Medea," beginning tonight on the Understage in Alumni Hall.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | April 9, 1993
A new and exciting option for theatergoers is about to appear on the Annapolis scene: Theatre in the Woods is coming!Theatre in the Woods is the brainchild of the gifted director T. G. Cooper, the Howard University professor whose Pamoja troupe will become the theater's ensemble in residence.Performances will be Thursday through Sunday evenings and Saturday matinees at the picturesque Unitarian Church set in a wooded lot off Dubois Road in Annapolis.The new theater will open May 27 with "Bojangles," Cooper's own musical docudrama on the life of the real Mr. Bojangles, Bill Robinson.
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