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By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2012
The Maryland medical society and attorney general's office launched a website Saturday aimed at helping doctors file complaints with the state when insurance companies refuse to cover patient care. "Essentially, our goal was to educate our patients and our physicians that there is an avenue for these complaints," said Gene Ransom III, CEO of MedChi, the state medical society. "We thought, 'Let's make it easier.'" The site, called Insurance Watch, is hosted on the Internet by the medical society.
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NEWS
August 3, 2014
Advocates are generally praising Maryland's proposed new medical marijuana regulations as a step in the right direction after an initial effort failed to make the drug available to patients with chronic pain, nausea and other conditions thought to be alleviated by it. But they have raised concerns about some details, particularly in how doctors would be required to handle the drug, that essentially boil down to this paradox: They object that the regulations...
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HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | April 10, 2012
State lawmakers have passed legislation pushed by Maryland doctors that will change the state's child safety seat laws. The law requires children under the age of 8 to sit in a child car safety seats unless they are 4'9" or taller. The bill, pushed by doctors group MedChi, did not include requirements that kids stay rear facing until age 2 or ride in the backseat until age 13 as the doctors group had wanted. Maryland law still recommends that kids under age 13 sit in the backseat.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2012
The Maryland medical society and attorney general's office launched a website Saturday aimed at helping doctors file complaints with the state when insurance companies refuse to cover patient care. "Essentially, our goal was to educate our patients and our physicians that there is an avenue for these complaints," said Gene Ransom III, CEO of MedChi, the state medical society. "We thought, 'Let's make it easier.'" The site, called Insurance Watch, is hosted on the Internet by the medical society.
NEWS
By Rawle Andrews Jr. and Gene M. Ransom III | December 7, 2010
First, the good news: Congress has voted to avert a 23 percent pay cut for Medicare doctors, which was scheduled to take effect Dec. 1. The bad news? This fix only lasts one month. Unless Congress acts by year's end, doctors who treat seniors and the disabled will see their reimbursement rates cut by 25 percent, threatening seniors' ability to either find a doctor or keep the one they have. This crisis has been more than a decade in the making. Congress created a new system for paying Medicare doctors in 1997.
NEWS
August 3, 2014
Advocates are generally praising Maryland's proposed new medical marijuana regulations as a step in the right direction after an initial effort failed to make the drug available to patients with chronic pain, nausea and other conditions thought to be alleviated by it. But they have raised concerns about some details, particularly in how doctors would be required to handle the drug, that essentially boil down to this paradox: They object that the regulations...
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2010
Hundreds of Maryland doctors have accepted fees, some exceeding six figures, from pharmaceutical companies in the past two years to promote their drugs to other doctors — a practice that is not illegal but raises ethical questions about the industry's influence over patient care. Large companies such as Merck and Eli Lilly have disclosed $258 million in payments nationwide in 2009 and the first half of 2010, with about $6 million going to Maryland physicians and a handful of nurses.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Sun Staff Writer | March 29, 1995
The former assistant controller of the state medical society has been charged with embezzling more than a half-million dollars from the organization over a six-year period.Phillip H. Moore, 49, of Lansdowne is charged with stealing $552,816.71 from the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland between 1987 and 1993, prosecutors said yesterday. He is to be arraigned April 10 in Baltimore Circuit Court on one count of felony theft.Mr. Moore is accused of taking the money by writing fraudulent checks on organization accounts, said Gary Honick, a prosecutor in the economic crimes unit of the Baltimore state's attorney's office.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Staff Writer | May 4, 1993
A story in yesterday's editions of The Sun incorrectly identified the hospital affiliation of Dr. Donald H. Dembo, newly chosen president-elect of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland. Dr. Dembo is chief of cardiology at Good Samaritan Hospital and teaches at Sinai Hospital.The Sun regrets the errors.The state medical society, apparently unhappy with the way Maryland doctors were represented in Annapolis this year, has ousted one of its top leaders in protest.Dr. Joseph Fastow, who has held the third highest post of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland, had been expected to become president-elect when the group met over the weekend in College Park.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2002
The prospects for major reforms of Maryland's system for disciplining doctors appear to be dimming in the wake of an aggressive lobbying effort by the state's medical society. The society, known as MedChi, is trying to strip the most significant elements from a legislative proposal to change the system of regulating physicians, said Sen. Paula C. Hollinger. "They're pulling out all the stops," the Baltimore County Democrat said of MedChi's lobbying efforts to thwart her bill, which aims to lessen the role that MedChi plays in regulating and disciplining Maryland doctors.
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | April 10, 2012
State lawmakers have passed legislation pushed by Maryland doctors that will change the state's child safety seat laws. The law requires children under the age of 8 to sit in a child car safety seats unless they are 4'9" or taller. The bill, pushed by doctors group MedChi, did not include requirements that kids stay rear facing until age 2 or ride in the backseat until age 13 as the doctors group had wanted. Maryland law still recommends that kids under age 13 sit in the backseat.
NEWS
By Gene M. Ransom III | August 29, 2011
As we all know, it's not necessarily what you do that matters but how you do it. In response to the Maryland General Assembly's mandate to slash an additional $40 million from this year's fiscal budget, the state's Medicaid Advisory Committee (MAC) and the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DHMH) are being forced to consider a series of radical cost-cutting measures for the state's Medicaid program. Make no mistake: Spending must be curbed. It's how costs are contained that matters.
NEWS
By Rawle Andrews Jr. and Gene M. Ransom III | December 7, 2010
First, the good news: Congress has voted to avert a 23 percent pay cut for Medicare doctors, which was scheduled to take effect Dec. 1. The bad news? This fix only lasts one month. Unless Congress acts by year's end, doctors who treat seniors and the disabled will see their reimbursement rates cut by 25 percent, threatening seniors' ability to either find a doctor or keep the one they have. This crisis has been more than a decade in the making. Congress created a new system for paying Medicare doctors in 1997.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2010
Hundreds of Maryland doctors have accepted fees, some exceeding six figures, from pharmaceutical companies in the past two years to promote their drugs to other doctors — a practice that is not illegal but raises ethical questions about the industry's influence over patient care. Large companies such as Merck and Eli Lilly have disclosed $258 million in payments nationwide in 2009 and the first half of 2010, with about $6 million going to Maryland physicians and a handful of nurses.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | August 19, 2005
The state medical society yesterday filed suit against UnitedHealth Group, the Minnesota health insurance giant, charging that United is illegally requiring doctors to contract with all of its health plans in order to contract with any of them. T. Michael Preston, executive director of MedChi, the 7,000- member medical society, said the freedom to choose among different plans offered by an insurer was "a major issue for physicians" and was guaranteed under a state law passed in 2000. The suit was filed in Circuit Court in Montgomery County.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | October 20, 2004
A group of legislators - including Republicans and Democrats, senators and delegates -threw their weight yesterday behind a malpractice reform package backed by MedChi, the state medical society, adding momentum to the drive to find a solution to soaring insurance premiums. The package and its legislative support can "give impetus to the discussion" as the governor, House speaker and Senate president try to craft a consensus package that could be presented to a special session this fall, said Del. Kumar P. Barve of Gaithersburg.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | October 20, 2004
A group of legislators - including Republicans and Democrats, senators and delegates -threw their weight yesterday behind a malpractice reform package backed by MedChi, the state medical society, adding momentum to the drive to find a solution to soaring insurance premiums. The package and its legislative support can "give impetus to the discussion" as the governor, House speaker and Senate president try to craft a consensus package that could be presented to a special session this fall, said Del. Kumar P. Barve of Gaithersburg.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2002
A Washington-based advocacy group said yesterday that Maryland has one of the nation's weakest systems of disciplining bad doctors, in part because it gives the state medical society a key role in investigating complaints of wrongdoing. Public Citizen's Health Research Group said the state ranked 43rd last year on license revocations, suspensions and surrenders - compared with a rank of 40 a year earlier. Dr. Sidney Wolfe, executive director of the group, placed blame squarely on the role played by MedChi, the state medical society, calling it a conflict of interest that allows doctors who have made serious medical mistakes to remain in practice and endanger other patients.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2002
A Washington-based advocacy group said yesterday that Maryland has one of the nation's weakest systems of disciplining bad doctors, in part because it gives the state medical society a key role in investigating complaints of wrongdoing. Public Citizen's Health Research Group said the state ranked 43rd last year on license revocations, suspensions and surrenders - compared with a rank of 40 a year earlier. Dr. Sidney Wolfe, executive director of the group, placed blame squarely on the role played by MedChi, the state medical society, calling it a conflict of interest that allows doctors who have made serious medical mistakes to remain in practice and endanger other patients.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2002
The prospects for major reforms of Maryland's system for disciplining doctors appear to be dimming in the wake of an aggressive lobbying effort by the state's medical society. The society, known as MedChi, is trying to strip the most significant elements from a legislative proposal to change the system of regulating physicians, said Sen. Paula C. Hollinger. "They're pulling out all the stops," the Baltimore County Democrat said of MedChi's lobbying efforts to thwart her bill, which aims to lessen the role that MedChi plays in regulating and disciplining Maryland doctors.
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