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Medal Of Honor

NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | May 11, 2008
There are 30 living Medal of Honor recipients from World War II, and Paul J. Wiedorfer from Parkville is one of them. "In fact, I'm the only living Maryland Congressional Medal of Honor winner," Wiedorfer, 87, said in an interview from his home the other day. Three days before V-E Day, May 8, 1945, Wiedorfer was recuperating at the 137th United States Army General Hospital in England, from wounds he received in a mortar attack while crossing the Saar...
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NEWS
November 26, 2007
JEFFERSON DeBLANC SR., 86 Medal of Honor recipient Retired Marine Col. Jefferson DeBlanc Sr., an ace fighter pilot who was awarded the Medal of Honor for bravery during World War II, died Thursday in Lafayette, La., of complications from pneumonia. Colonel DeBlanc was presented with the Medal of Honor, the nation's highest military honor, on Dec. 6, 1946, for his actions during a bombing raid against the Japanese in the Solomon Islands on Jan. 31, 1943. A lieutenant barely in his 20s, he was in charge of the six planes providing air cover.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | November 10, 2007
The other day, Ted Lingelbach, City College Class of '58, who edits the high school's alumni newsletter, contacted me. With Veterans Day coming up, he wanted to call my attention to the three City College graduates who were posthumously decorated with the Medal of Honor for heroism during World Wars I and II. Several years ago, a plaque to Henry G. Costin, Milton E. Ricketts and Isadore Jachman was unveiled outside the City College auditorium. Costin, who lived at 1041 Myrtle Ave., had gained fame playing football and baseball while a student at City College.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,Sun Reporter | August 29, 2007
The nicknames of Rear Adm. Eugene B. Fluckey -- "The Galloping Ghost of the China Coast" and "Lucky Fluckey" -- meant to bring a little levity to the exploits of one of the most decorated sailors in history. But as loved ones and shipmates approached an urn on display under the vast dome of the Naval Academy chapel yesterday to say a few words, many stopped in awe, bowing slightly as a last homage to the man who sank 29 Japanese ships as a submarine commander in the Pacific on his way to receiving the Medal of Honor and four Navy Crosses.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | July 1, 2007
Rear Adm. Eugene B. Fluckey never saw problems, only solutions that he would steadfastly work through. The philosophy stood him well during a naval career that spanned nearly 40 years. One of the Navy's top submarine commanders during World War II, the Medal of Honor recipient sank 29 ships, including an aircraft carrier, and members of his crew blew up a Japanese troop transport train on shore. And, for years afterward, he boasted that he never had to award a Purple Heart to any of his crew.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,sun reporter | April 13, 2007
Howard County police this week awarded Officer Raymond Trodden the department's highest honor for shooting a suspect as he dragged another officer from a sport utility vehicle for several hundred feet. The injured officer, Pfc. Daniel Besseck, who suffered a herniated disk in his neck and lower back and nerve damage in the July 2006 confrontation, received the Purple Heart during the Police Department's annual awards ceremony Wednesday in the County Council chambers in Ellicott City. "He was trying to kill me," Besseck said during a video, in which he and Trodden described their efforts to arrest Robert Michael Brown of Frederick, who police said was naked from the waist down and had a crack pipe in his Hyundai SUV. Besseck thanked the department for its support during his recuperation.
NEWS
By Kirsten Scharnberg and Kirsten Scharnberg,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 10, 2006
CHICAGO -- The men who were there that day say they could see the options flicker across Michael Monsoor's face: save himself or save the men he had long considered brothers. He chose them. In the span of just seconds, on a rooftop in the Iraqi city of Ramadi, Monsoor watched the enemy grenade bounce to the ground. The 25-year-old Navy SEAL assessed that it likely would kill all three of his nearby comrades, men with wives and small children. He screamed, "Grenade!" then hurled himself on top of the explosive and bore the brunt of its lethal blast.
NEWS
By James Gerstenzang and James Gerstenzang,Los Angeles Times | November 11, 2006
WASHINGTON -- On what would have been the 25th birthday of Marine Cpl. Jason Dunham, President Bush said yesterday that the Marine, who died from wounds suffered in Iraq, would be awarded the Medal of Honor, the nation's highest decoration for valor. Dunham, from Scio, N.Y., was 22 years old when he died in April 2004, after using his body and helmet to save two fellow Marines from an insurgent's grenade. Bush recounted Dunham's exploit during a ceremony marking the opening of the National Museum of the Marine Corps at Quantico, Va., on the 231st anniversary of the founding of the Marine Corps "He and his men stopped a convoy of cars that were trying to make an escape," said Bush.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | November 4, 2006
Paul J. Wiedorfer, a seasoned World War II infantryman, was in traction and recuperating from wounds in an English hospital when he heard the news. A fellow patient reading Stars and Stripes, asked him how he spelled his name and then said, "You know you got the Medal of Honor?" "That was the first I heard of it. When I found out I was getting it, I didn't even know what the hell it was," said Wiedorfer, now 85, in an interview from his Parkville home the other day. Wiedorfer, who was born and raised in Baltimore, is one of four Medal of Honor recipients thought to be residing in the state.
NEWS
By BRADLEY OLSON and BRADLEY OLSON,SUN REPORTER | February 8, 2006
The United States Naval Academy Alumni Association and Foundation has named four alumni recipients of the academy's Distinguished Graduate Award, including a Medal of Honor winner and a two-time academy superintendent. The award recipients are: Capt. Thomas Hudner, a 1947 graduate; Adm. Kinnaird R. McKee, a 1951 graduate; Gen. Robert T. Herres, a 1954 graduate; and Adm. Charles R. Larson, a 1958 graduate. George P. Watt Jr., president and chief executive of the alumni association, said in a statement that the four men were chosen among a pool of hundreds of distinguished alumni.
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