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Medal Of Honor

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NEWS
October 10, 1999
These five men who served during the Civil War won the Medal of Honor twice:Thomas W. Custer, 2nd lieutenant, Company B, 6th Michigan Cavalry, received the Medal of Honor for action at Namozine Church, Va., April 3, 1865, where he took about a dozen Confederate prisoners and their regiment's colors; the second award was for action at Sayler's Creek, Va., April 6, 1865, where he was wounded capturing the colors of another Confederate regiment.Frank D. Baldwin, captain, Company D, 19th Michigan Infantry, was decorated for action July 12, 1864, at Peach Tree Creek, Ga., where he entered the Confederate line and captured two officers and a Georgia regiment's guidon; for his second award he was a 1st lieutenant, 5th U.S. Infantry, Nov. 8, 1874, at McClellans Creek, Texas, when with two companies he attacked a superior number of Indians in a strong position to rescue two white girls, who would have been killed if Baldwin had delayed action until reinforcements arrived.
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SPORTS
By Jonas Shaffer, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
Quarterback Danny O'Brien signed with Maryland in 2009 in part because of Ralph Friedgen. O'Brien wanted to win in college and play in the pros, and it wasn't unreasonable to believe the longtime Terps coach would be there for him, helping him, from his freshman-year snaps to his Senior Day game. Where else would they go? We know those answers now, and so their reunion Saturday doesn't seem all that bizarre. But to have Friedgen, happily unemployed and the coach of the Medal of Honor Bowl 's American team, game-planningĀ at a largely unheard-of senior showcase with O'Brien, a senior at Division II Catawba College (N.C.)
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NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Staff Writer | May 30, 1993
The cavalcade of Medal of Honor recipients that John Baca joined reads like a Who's Who of military heroes.There were Sgt. Alvin C. York, Maj. Gregory "Pappy" Boyington, Brig. Gen. James H. Doolittle, 1st Lt. Audie Murphy, and the only father-son recipients, Arthur and Douglas MacArthur.Union Seaman John Williams was the first. While serving aboard the USS Commodore Perry in October 1861, he held his position against withering fire from Confederate batteries at Franklin, Va., to almost single-handedly win the battle on the Blackwater River.
NEWS
September 19, 2011
I think the editors of The Sun have finally suffered a mental breakdown. Please explain to me why Berger Cookies and their drippy containers ("After flood, Berger Cookies back in boxes, on shelves," Sept. 16) would be on the front page while the article regarding Dakota Meyer saving the lives of 36 fellow soldiers ("Medal of Honor recipient braved 'kill zone' to save pals") is relegated to Page 6? Please, I need to know why. Don't tell me it's because Berger is a Baltimore company.
NEWS
By Kirsten Scharnberg and Kirsten Scharnberg,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 10, 2006
CHICAGO -- The men who were there that day say they could see the options flicker across Michael Monsoor's face: save himself or save the men he had long considered brothers. He chose them. In the span of just seconds, on a rooftop in the Iraqi city of Ramadi, Monsoor watched the enemy grenade bounce to the ground. The 25-year-old Navy SEAL assessed that it likely would kill all three of his nearby comrades, men with wives and small children. He screamed, "Grenade!" then hurled himself on top of the explosive and bore the brunt of its lethal blast.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | December 18, 2003
Three Baltimore police officers were awarded the Medal of Honor yesterday for helping save the life of a comrade who had been shot by a sniper during a drug arrest last year. The officers - Sgt. Sean R. Kapfhammer, Ralph J. Ciambruschini and William P. Hoover - were honored during the city Police Department's annual award ceremony, which also recognized the work of dozens of other officers and citizens for valor, assiduousness and service. The wounded officer, Christopher B. Houser, 31, was honored with the department's citation of valor.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1995
An officer who grabbed a woman jumping from the 21st floor of a Towson condominium will receive the Baltimore County Police Department's Medal of Honor -- its highest award -- at a commendations ceremony tonight.The Silver Star, the department's second-highest honor, is being awarded to five other policemen, while three people who helped make arrests will receive Citizen Valor Awards in the 6:30 p.m. program at Goucher College.Receiving the Medal of Honor is Officer Joseph E. Yeater, whose quick action saved a despondent, 39-year-old woman from death when she jumped over a balcony railing at Towson Towers on Allegheny Avenue.
NEWS
By Robert M. Duff and Robert M. Duff,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 26, 2005
When thousands of Civil War re-enactors and spectators gather at Gettysburg, Pa., next weekend to commemorate the 142nd anniversary of the war's pivotal battle, the courage of their forebears will be much on their minds. One indicator of the ferocity of the fighting at Gettysburg is the number of soldiers who received the Medal of Honor. "The Medal of Honor was born of the need to recognize the valor of soldiers in the Civil War, and nowhere were actions of bravery and courage in the war seen more than at the Battle of Gettysburg.
NEWS
By BRADLEY OLSON and BRADLEY OLSON,SUN REPORTER | February 8, 2006
The United States Naval Academy Alumni Association and Foundation has named four alumni recipients of the academy's Distinguished Graduate Award, including a Medal of Honor winner and a two-time academy superintendent. The award recipients are: Capt. Thomas Hudner, a 1947 graduate; Adm. Kinnaird R. McKee, a 1951 graduate; Gen. Robert T. Herres, a 1954 graduate; and Adm. Charles R. Larson, a 1958 graduate. George P. Watt Jr., president and chief executive of the alumni association, said in a statement that the four men were chosen among a pool of hundreds of distinguished alumni.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 7, 1998
SARATOGA SPRINGS, N.Y. -- They wore baseball caps and golf shirts and, some of them, hearing aids. They talked about wives and ex-wives, reminisced about 10-cent bottles of beer and just laughed a lot. Only the pointed gold medals dangling from their necks hinted that this was a convention of old heroes.There was Lewis Lee Millett, his Army crew cut still sharp at age 77, who in Korea led a bayonet charge up a hill against enemy fire. And Ronald Ray, 56, who in Vietnam shielded his men from a grenade by diving in front of it. And Jack Montgomery, a small, quiet man of 80, who in World War II killed 11 Germans and captured 32 others in a single battle.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2011
On Christmas Day during the Battle of the Bulge, Paul J. Wiedorfer charged 150 yards across a snow- and ice-covered field under intense enemy fire, single-handedly knocked out two German machine gun nests and took 24 prisoners. His spectacular feat earned him the Medal of Honor, the nation's highest military honor. "Suddenly something popped into my mind. Something had to be done, and someone had to do it. And I just did it. I can't tell you why," Mr. Wiedorfer recalled in a 2008 interview with The Baltimore Sun. Mr. Wiedorfer died Wednesday of heart failure at Loch Raven Community Living and Rehabilitation Center.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2011
Paul J. Wiedorfer, who was Maryland's last surviving World War II recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor, died Wednesday of heart failure at Loch Raven Community Living and Rehabilitation Center. The former Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. director of safety and training, who lived in Parkville, was 90. Wiedorfer, who was decorated with the nation's highest military honor for bravery, had dashed some 150 yards across a field and singlehandedly knocked out two German machine gun nests during the Battle of the Bulge.
NEWS
August 2, 2009
STUART I. ROCHESTER, 63 Co-author of book on POWs Stuart I. Rochester, chief historian of the Office of the Secretary of Defense and the co-author of a book many consider the definitive account of American prisoners of war in Southeast Asia, died of melanoma Wednesday at his home in Burtonsville. Honor Bound: American Prisoners of War in Southeast Asia, 1961-1973 (1998) was written with Frederick T. Kiley, a retired Air Force colonel and teacher at the U.S. Air Force Academy. In harrowing detail, the 720-page volume tells the story of hundreds of American captives, among them future Sen. John McCain, former Alabama Republican Sen. Jeremiah Denton and Medal of Honor recipients George "Bud" Day and Humbert "Rocky" Versace.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | November 5, 2008
With the election over, the TV schedule returns to some semblance of normal. But expect the networks to break into news programming as events dictate - we do, after all, have a president-elect. AMERICAN HEROES PBS takes a look at those who have received one of the nation's highest awards in Medal of Honor, a documentary co-produced by Ken Burns' Florentine Films. Produced and directed by Roger Sherman, Medal of Honor profiles several people who have won the award. Starting with Sgt. Paul Smith, the first soldier to win the medal in the Iraq war, Sherman follows the award back to its roots in the Civil War. (9 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67)
NEWS
By KATHLEEN PARKER | September 12, 2008
CAMDEN, S.C. - While the political class was focused on the meaning of pigs wearing lipstick, a few fortunate South Carolinians were riveted by the meaning of valor. The occasion was a celebration of four of the state's living recipients of the Medal of Honor: Charles Murray Jr. (Army, World War II, 1944), John Baker (Army, Vietnam, 1966), James Livingston (Marines, Vietnam, 1968) and Michael Thornton (Navy, Vietnam, 1972). The four appeared in Camden (at an event my husband helped organize)
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2000
WASHINGTON -- It took 34 years, but Alfred V. Rascon has finally received his due. Yesterday, the North Laurel resident received the Medal of Honor, the nation's highest military award for valor, for his bravery on March 16, 1966 -- the day he jumped into enemy fire not once but several times to rescue fellow platoon members. At least six of Rascon's war comrades attended the afternoon ceremony at the White House. Before they flew in earlier this week, Rascon had not seen them for more than three decades, not since the day he risked his life to save theirs.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2003
At some point during the day, Brian M. Thacker's mind travels back to a remote hilltop in Kontum Province, in South Vietnam's Central Highlands. He vividly recalls the faces and names of the brave men who occupied Fire Base 6. It is forever 1971. "I came to realize that it was inevitable and that I would think about it every day," Thacker said in an interview this week. "I tried to put it behind me and I think that's the way it is with all of my colleagues." A Vietnam-era Army first lieutenant, Thacker, 58, is retired from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and lives in Wheaton.
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