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By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | September 27, 1990
The themes that life is a "miracle" even the most ordinary person can make happen and that "trust" and "freedom" are the most valuable commodities form the philosophical crux of "The Road to Mecca." Athol Fugard's probing study of two women bTC played out against the background of a near feudal village in South Africa is being presented at the Fells Point Corner Theatre through Oct. 7.Admirably directed by Denise Ratajczak, this is a first-class production featuring strong performances by veteran local actors Beverly Sokal, Julie-Ann Elliott and Bruce Godfrey.
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NEWS
By Stephen J.K. Walters | September 23, 2012
If you haven't been to Harborplace lately, stop by. It's had some work done. And like many facelifts, the beauty of this one surely depends on the eye of the beholder. Suburban mall rats will feel right at home. The Light Street pavilion features chain retailers like Urban Outfitter, chain restaurants like Hooters, and even a chain tourist attraction in Ripley's Believe It or Not "Odditorium" (one of 32 nationwide). Pratt Street's offerings also skew generic (featuring, e.g., one of 170 extant Cheesecake Factories)
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NEWS
February 3, 2004
The hajj - the pilgrimage to Islam's holy city of Mecca - is required of all Muslims once in their lifetime, if they are physically and financially capable of making the journey. It is one of the five pillars of Islam, following the footsteps of the Prophet Muhammad, reminding Muslims of their commitment to God and of Judgment Day. As this year's hajj approached, with more than 2 million pilgrims heading to Mecca, Saudi authorities prepared to prevent an epidemic of SARS, meningitis or yellow fever and, at the last minute, worried about avian flu. As usual, they made plans for crowd control in Mina, where 180 people were killed in a stampede in 1998.
NEWS
June 2, 2012
Kudos to the Loyola Greyhounds and Maryland Terrapins for putting Baltimore and Maryland back at the apex of men's Division I college lacrosse ("Charles Street bragging rights," May 30). But where's the love for the Salisbury mens' lacrosse team? What The Sun seems to consistently overlook are the tremendous feats the Division III Salisbury Gulls mens' lacrosse program has amassed. Head Coach Jim Berkman is the winningest mens' college lacrosse coach in the history of the game (that includes all divisions)
NEWS
August 25, 1991
Rosemarie Mecca and Hedy Dachel of Bendix Field Engineering Corp. presented an Allied-Signal Foundation grant of $3,000 to Andrea Ingram,executive director of the Grassroots Crisis Intervention Center.Mecca, an associate program manager, and Dachel, a manager with employee benefits serve on Grassroots' board of directors.ILLUSTRATION: PHOTO 1CAPTION: ROSEMARIE MECCAILLUSTRATION: PHOTO 2CAPTION: HEDY DACHELILLUSTRATION: PHOTO 3CAPTION: ANDREA INGRAMSPEICE NAMED VPByron D. Speice of Ellicott City has been named vice president ofoperations at the Baltimore Aircoil Co. in Jessup.
TRAVEL
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 27, 2005
Visitors to the Las Vegas Strip will see a sight more suited to London than the gambling mecca -- double-decker buses. The Deuce, which the Regional Transportation Commission of Southern Nevada launched last month, takes riders on a 4-mile loop from the South Strip Transfer Terminal to the north end. It runs every seven minutes. A ride on the 97-passenger buses costs $2; a day pass is $5. Transportation officials expect the Deuce will carry 37,000 people or more, and they hope that, along with the monorail that runs along the Strip's east side, the buses will alleviate traffic congestion along the Strip "in a fun way," said Ingrid Reisman, a spokeswoman for the commission.
NEWS
By ANDREI CODRESCU | November 14, 1994
Minneapolis -- I went to the Mecca of America near Minneapolis. It's called the Mall of America. It has two freeway entrances all its own. It's the size of my hometown in Romania. It's self-sufficient.Not only is it self-sufficient; it has everything. Clothes for the body. Shoes for the mind. Food for the hungry. A hotel for the sleepy. Action for children. Heat for the old. Roller-blading routes for the limber. Jogging space for the trim. It has a huge Lego ball that rotates while you eat. There are Lego dinosaurs and a plunging canoe for you and your date.
NEWS
September 8, 1998
Herbert Barness, 74, a millionaire real estate developer and prominent Republican fund-raiser, died Saturday in Doylestown, Pa.Mr. Barness' family business, the Barness Organization, is one of the largest developers of houses and shopping malls in the area. His parents, Mary and Joe Barness, launched the business 73 years ago.Mr. Barness used his wealth to support the political campaigns of prominent Republicans, such as Sen. Arlen Specter. He was a member of the Republican National Committee at the time of his death.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 30, 1994
CAIRO, Egypt -- Saudi Arabia will not participate in the United Nations population conference next month in Cairo, U.N. officials here said yesterday, giving rise to fears that other Islamic nations will follow the lead of the Saudis.The Saudis' withdrawal supplies political ammunition to both moderate and militant Islamic groups that have condemned the conference as a plot to dominate the Muslim world by spreading Western "immorality."The agenda for the conference, which has also drawn fire from the Vatican, addresses the impact that population pressures have on development.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | July 24, 2005
WASHINGTON - It is probably not a good idea in terms of job security to publicly call your boss a horse's ass. So have some sympathy for Will Adams, spokesman for Colorado Rep. Tom Tancredo. He was asked by reporters to explain the asinine thing the congressman said recently. Mr. Adams told them Mr. Tancredo is just a "free thinker." By which standard Michael Jackson is just a tad eccentric. Or haven't you heard? Mr. Tancredo thinks maybe the United States should bomb Mecca. You know Mecca.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2011
Baltimore Taphouse in Canton looks just fine when you walk in. It's a long, narrow hall, with plenty of beer on tap and a pool table at the back. But the first sign that you might be in better hands than you thought is found above the cash register. There, owner John Bates has propped up a dog-eared copy of Michael Jackson's "Great Beer Guide. " Jackson is the elder statesman among beer and whiskey writers — the Julia Child of beer lovers. His place above the bar suggests that the Taphouse serves one master: beer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2011
The strip mall bar is maybe a rung below the outlet mall bar and just a couple of notches above a dive on U.S. 40. From the outside, Columbia's newest watering hole, the Frisco Tap and Brew House, doesn't inspire much confidence. It's sandwiched between a furniture store and a BMW motorcycle showroom. At the end of the strip, there's a Batteries Plus. Frisco looks handsome — wide windows and a tastefully designed facade — just the way a Chipotle can look handsome.
NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Ken Ellingwood,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 6, 2007
JERUSALEM -- Leaders of rival Palestinian groups Fatah and Hamas will meet today in a new venue, but they confront the same obstacles to a power-sharing arrangement that have torpedoed past negotiations. The two sides gather in the Muslim holy city of Mecca in what could be a final attempt to form a unity government aimed at ending their yearlong power struggle and breaking the Western aid embargo imposed after Hamas won parliamentary elections in January 2006. Stakes are high. The talks come after a new spate of factional clashes in the Gaza Strip that left more than two dozen Palestinians dead and dimmed hopes of resolving the deadlock through peaceful negotiations.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 29, 2007
. JERUSALEM --King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia called yesterday on rival Palestinian factions to hold emergency talks in the holy city of Mecca in the most recent bid to halt some of the worst-ever Palestinian internal fighting. As the two main factions, Hamas and Fatah, waged a fourth straight day of fighting in the Gaza Strip, leaders from both groups said they would take up the invitation by the Saudi monarch, though no date was set. "I call on my brothers, the Palestinian people, represented by their leaders, to put an immediate end to this tragedy and to abide by righteousness," the king said in an announcement carried by the official Saudi Press Agency.
NEWS
By RON HOLLANDER and RON HOLLANDER,SUN REPORTER | July 10, 2006
Never mind the trains, they want the bricks. Yes, the bricks. Forget that they're no more unusual than any one of a million rail spikes securing a length of track anywhere in America. Doesn't matter that they're painted red. The customers of MB Klein--downtown Baltimore's model train store founded in 1913 and as venerated as a Lionel steam engine -- are so devoted to this mecca of model railroading that they want souvenir bricks from the building when the store moves next June. A few bricks are already missing from the southeast corner of the 19th-century, two-story building that with its brick sills and green, wood-framed windows looks as if it were transported from a model railroad's industrial section.
NEWS
By ERICKA BLOUNT DANOIS and ERICKA BLOUNT DANOIS,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 5, 2006
BALTIMORE'S RICH African-American history comes from a combination of its unique locale and its status and opportunities as a port city during slavery and the Civil War. Residents never considered the city a part of the Deep South, although Maryland was a slave state. Baltimore's harbor was once a port in the slave trade. However, because the city wasn't an agricultural area, there were free blacks as well, which created a more open political and social climate for slaves seeking freedom.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 16, 2003
NEW YORK - On the way home from the hajj, his emotion-laden pilgrimage to Islam's holy shrines in Saudi Arabia, Shamsul Quadir began to worry that he might get in trouble for coming back a changed man. "I left clean-shaven and with a full head of hair, and now look at me," Quadir said Friday after clearing the immigration and customs booths at Kennedy International Airport in New York. Quadir, a Pakistani-born shopkeeper from Louisiana, wore a five-day growth of dark beard, and when he shyly lifted his baseball cap he revealed a bare, shiny scalp.
NEWS
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 14, 1991
DHAHRAN, Saudi Arabia -- For many Saudis, Jan. 15 was an important date long before the arrival of American soldiers, a day whose significance was not appreciably altered by the impasse between the United States and Iraq or any other events.For soldiers, tomorrow is the day when the United States gains United Nations authority to launch a war against Iraq to push it out of Kuwait. For Saudis, it remains primarily the date for school vacation and taking relaxing trips abroad."It's part of a 10-day break," a Saudi businessman earnestly explained.
NEWS
By MEGAN K. STACK and MEGAN K. STACK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 13, 2006
CAIRO, Egypt -- A stampede at one of Islam's holiest sites crushed to death at least 345 worshippers yesterday, tainting with tragedy the annual hajj pilgrimage to the Muslim religion's birthplace in Saudi Arabia. As thick waves of worshippers made their way through the desert plain of Mina to perform one of the fundamental rituals of hajj, lost luggage piled up underfoot and tripped pilgrims. With thousands of eager Muslims pressing from behind, the bodies quickly piled up - and the crowd trampled over them.
TRAVEL
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 27, 2005
Visitors to the Las Vegas Strip will see a sight more suited to London than the gambling mecca -- double-decker buses. The Deuce, which the Regional Transportation Commission of Southern Nevada launched last month, takes riders on a 4-mile loop from the South Strip Transfer Terminal to the north end. It runs every seven minutes. A ride on the 97-passenger buses costs $2; a day pass is $5. Transportation officials expect the Deuce will carry 37,000 people or more, and they hope that, along with the monorail that runs along the Strip's east side, the buses will alleviate traffic congestion along the Strip "in a fun way," said Ingrid Reisman, a spokeswoman for the commission.
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