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April 13, 2006
Hazel K. Frantz, a former Baltimore meatpacking company worker and bowler, died in her sleep April 5 at the Chestertown Nursing and Rehabilitation Center. The former Hillendale resident was 96. She was born Hazel Kelley and raised in Rock Hall, and was a graduate of Kent County public schools. Mrs. Frantz came to Baltimore during the 1940s and went to work in the bacon preparation department of the old Albert F. Goetze Co. Inc., the Northeast Baltimore meatpacking company. She retired in the late 1970s.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2013
Anita R. Sody, former corporate secretary and treasurer of a Baltimore meatpacking business, died Jan. 21 of pneumonia at Season's Hospice at Good Samaritan Hospital. She was 88. Anita Ramming was born in Baltimore and raised on Harford Road in Northeast Baltimore. She was a 1942 graduate of Eastern High School. In her youth, she enjoyed singing with the choir at St. Matthew's Lutheran Church. A former resident of Sparks and Towson, Mrs. Sody had been secretary and treasurer of A.W. Schmidt & Sons, a family-owned meatpacking business in the old Belair Market, from 1978 to 1991.
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NEWS
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | December 31, 1999
NEW YORK -- New Yorkers crave novelty, even if they have to tiptoe around a puddle of congealed beef fat in their leather Gucci loafers to get to it.Every emissary of city culture, from art world avant-gardians, to culinary royalty, couture kings and club queens, is staking a claim in the meatpacking district.This compact area on the outskirts of the West Village is only four blocks deep, bordered by Ninth Avenue on the east, the Hudson River on the west, West 14th Street on the north and Gansevoort Street on the south.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2012
Andrew W. Schmidt III, former owner of a Northeast Baltimore meatpacking company and cattle breeder, died March 1 of cancer at his Monkton home. He was 80. Andrew William Schmidt III was born in Baltimore and raised in Mayfield. After graduating in 1949 from Polytechnic Institute, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1953 from the University of Delaware. He served in the Army as a lieutenant in the infantry from 1953 to 1955. Mr. Schmidt joined A.W. Schmidt & Son Inc., a wholesale meatpacking house in the 2100 block of Harford Road that had been established in 1880 by his grandfather, Andrew W. Schmidt Sr. He operated the business for 38 years until retiring in 1991.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | November 24, 2002
NEW YORK -- The stench of slaughter is inescapable most days in the meatpacking district. For decades, this cluster of narrow streets on the cusp of trendy Chelsea and the West Village has been home to many of the city's meat distributors. A sign boasts "Gachot, Quality Meats Since 1903," and ubiquitous large ads tout wholesale beef, chicken and lamb. But, lately, a whiff of something different has been creeping into the neighborhood. As an aproned man hosed down the sidewalk outside Eastern Meats on West 14th Street one recent afternoon, stylish women just across the street thumbed through racks of Stella McCartney wool coats and satin bomber jackets.
NEWS
March 21, 1994
* Edward Foss Wilson, a retired board chairman and president of Wilson & Co., died of cancer Saturday at age 89 at Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington, D.C. Mr. Wilson, who lived in White Post, Va., became one of the country's youngest corporate presidents in 1934 when he took over the Chicago meatpacking company founded by his father. He built the company into an $800 million-a-year diversified operation.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | September 3, 1993
A 1,000-pound bull escaped from a Northeast Baltimore slaughterhouse yesterday and ran wild for seven blocks before two police officers fired 10 gunshots and killed it, police said.The bull broke free about 11:50 a.m. from a pen at the Charles J. Schmidt & Co. Inc. meatpacking plant in the 2100 block of Harford Road and ran north, police said.Along the way, the animal frightened numerous motorists who were shocked to see a bull running in traffic, but no accidents were reported, police said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 26, 2005
For the first time, Human Rights Watch has issued a report that harshly criticizes a single industry in the United States, concluding that working conditions among the nation's meatpackers and slaughterhouses are so bad that they violate basic human rights. The report, released yesterday, echoes Upton Sinclair's classic on the industry, The Jungle. It finds that jobs in many beef, pork and poultry plants are so dangerous as to breach international agreements promising a safe workplace.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2000
Michael J. Aiello, a homebuilder and founder of a food processing company, died Saturday of cancer at Mercy Medical Center. He was 65 and lived in Cockeysville. He was chairman of Cher-Chris Construction Co. Inc., a Cockeysville homebuilding firm, and Caribbean Products Ltd., a Hampden meatpacking operation that produces pork and beef products. "He was an entrepreneur who never rested until he was finished," said Virginia Lambrow, a business associate from Baltimore Contractors Inc. "If you were in trouble, he was there to put his hand to your elbow."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2012
Andrew W. Schmidt III, former owner of a Northeast Baltimore meatpacking company and cattle breeder, died March 1 of cancer at his Monkton home. He was 80. Andrew William Schmidt III was born in Baltimore and raised in Mayfield. After graduating in 1949 from Polytechnic Institute, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1953 from the University of Delaware. He served in the Army as a lieutenant in the infantry from 1953 to 1955. Mr. Schmidt joined A.W. Schmidt & Son Inc., a wholesale meatpacking house in the 2100 block of Harford Road that had been established in 1880 by his grandfather, Andrew W. Schmidt Sr. He operated the business for 38 years until retiring in 1991.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2011
George J. Maurer, a butcher who was a former partner and owner of Maurer & Miller Meats in Manchester, died Feb. 20 of progressive supranuclear palsy at the Brethren Home in Cross Keys, Pa. The former longtime Manchester resident was 80. The son of a carpenter and a homemaker, Mr. Maurer was born the sixth of 12 children and raised in Hastings, Mich. When his father died, Mr. Maurer was 11 and got a paper route to help support his family. Three years later, he went to work for a neighbor who owned a grocery store.
NEWS
By Nicole Gaouette and Nicole Gaouette,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 13, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Federal officials raided six meatpacking plants across the country yesterday in the culmination of a 10-month investigation triggered by allegations that illegal immigrants were using the stolen identities of U.S. citizens. The raids, all at plants operated by Swift & Co., resulted in arrests of workers on immigration violations and some criminal warrants, with charges of aggravated identity theft possible at a later date, officials said. The number of arrests was not immediately known.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 22, 2006
TOKYO -- Japan said yesterday that it would resume imports of American beef after reaching an agreement that allows Japanese inspectors into American meatpacking plants, a highly unusual concession by the United States. The agreement might end a prickly and long-running trade dispute that had blemished the otherwise close relations between Washington and Tokyo, a loyal American ally. It comes a week before Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi is due to visit the United States, probably for the last time before his scheduled retirement in September.
NEWS
April 13, 2006
Hazel K. Frantz, a former Baltimore meatpacking company worker and bowler, died in her sleep April 5 at the Chestertown Nursing and Rehabilitation Center. The former Hillendale resident was 96. She was born Hazel Kelley and raised in Rock Hall, and was a graduate of Kent County public schools. Mrs. Frantz came to Baltimore during the 1940s and went to work in the bacon preparation department of the old Albert F. Goetze Co. Inc., the Northeast Baltimore meatpacking company. She retired in the late 1970s.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 26, 2005
For the first time, Human Rights Watch has issued a report that harshly criticizes a single industry in the United States, concluding that working conditions among the nation's meatpackers and slaughterhouses are so bad that they violate basic human rights. The report, released yesterday, echoes Upton Sinclair's classic on the industry, The Jungle. It finds that jobs in many beef, pork and poultry plants are so dangerous as to breach international agreements promising a safe workplace.
TRAVEL
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 23, 2003
There are always plenty of reasons to visit Manhattan -- seeing a Broadway show, touring extraordinary museums or dining in high style being just a few. But let's be honest. As the holiday season approaches, one of the city's chief attractions is world-class shopping. So it's distressing that some of Gotham's most prestigious retail areas -- Rockefeller Center, 57th Street and Soho -- have become crowded of late with the same shops you can find at the local mall. Do you really need to brave New York City to buy something at the Disney Store or the Gap?
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 22, 2006
TOKYO -- Japan said yesterday that it would resume imports of American beef after reaching an agreement that allows Japanese inspectors into American meatpacking plants, a highly unusual concession by the United States. The agreement might end a prickly and long-running trade dispute that had blemished the otherwise close relations between Washington and Tokyo, a loyal American ally. It comes a week before Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi is due to visit the United States, probably for the last time before his scheduled retirement in September.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | May 12, 1993
An article in yesterday's Sun about the strike at the Parks Sausage Co. incorrectly described Parks as the only major meatpacker operating in Baltimore. A table of closed meatpacking plants that accompanied the story incorrectly included Saval Foods Corp. and the White Coffee Pot Commissary, which are still operating in Baltimore.The Sun regrets the errors.Managers and striking workers at Parks Sausage Co. agreed yesterday to meet with a federal mediator Monday in an attempt to end a dispute over the company's request for pay cuts and other contract concessions.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | November 24, 2002
NEW YORK -- The stench of slaughter is inescapable most days in the meatpacking district. For decades, this cluster of narrow streets on the cusp of trendy Chelsea and the West Village has been home to many of the city's meat distributors. A sign boasts "Gachot, Quality Meats Since 1903," and ubiquitous large ads tout wholesale beef, chicken and lamb. But, lately, a whiff of something different has been creeping into the neighborhood. As an aproned man hosed down the sidewalk outside Eastern Meats on West 14th Street one recent afternoon, stylish women just across the street thumbed through racks of Stella McCartney wool coats and satin bomber jackets.
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