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Meat Thermometer

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NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin | November 22, 2006
Be sure to sanitize your meat thermometer before and between each use. Wash it; then immerse the stem in 170-degree water for 30 seconds or wipe with a sanitizer. eatturkey.com plimoth.org For history (and historical recipes) to go with your Thanksgiving repast tomorrow, check out this Web site from Plimoth Plantation, the living-history museum in Massachusetts.
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NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin | November 22, 2006
Be sure to sanitize your meat thermometer before and between each use. Wash it; then immerse the stem in 170-degree water for 30 seconds or wipe with a sanitizer. eatturkey.com plimoth.org For history (and historical recipes) to go with your Thanksgiving repast tomorrow, check out this Web site from Plimoth Plantation, the living-history museum in Massachusetts.
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NEWS
October 8, 2000
To reduce the risk of food-borne illness from grilled beef, use a meat thermometer to ensure that the internal temperature of the thickest part of the meat reaches 145 degrees for medium rare or 160 degrees for medium. -- Cole's Cooking A to Z
NEWS
By MARGE PERRY and MARGE PERRY,Newsday | August 27, 2006
Grilled chicken may be the easiest of all dinner solutions in warm weather. To make great, moist, juicy and safe grilled chicken, you need a meat thermometer (don't judge doneness by color; it isn't accurate or safe), and to understand the basic differences in techniques depending on whether it is dark or light meat and bone-in or boneless. Grill boneless cuts directly over the fire. Breasts should be cooked to 160 degrees; thighs to 180 degrees. Bone-in cuts get cooked to the same temperature but take longer.
NEWS
By MARGE PERRY and MARGE PERRY,Newsday | August 27, 2006
Grilled chicken may be the easiest of all dinner solutions in warm weather. To make great, moist, juicy and safe grilled chicken, you need a meat thermometer (don't judge doneness by color; it isn't accurate or safe), and to understand the basic differences in techniques depending on whether it is dark or light meat and bone-in or boneless. Grill boneless cuts directly over the fire. Breasts should be cooked to 160 degrees; thighs to 180 degrees. Bone-in cuts get cooked to the same temperature but take longer.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | March 2, 1994
Q: Even though I add an entire bulb (about 12 cloves) of garlic to my pasta sauce and then simmer it, the finished sauce does not taste as spicy as I would like. Should I add more garlic?A: For a very robust red sauce for pasta, the amount of garlic you are using sounds sufficient, but you might change the technique a bit for optimum flavor. Try adding the garlic about 10 minutes before the sauce has finished cooking. The garlic will be more potent since it hasn't simmered for such a long time.
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | September 5, 1999
If ever meat was made for grilling, it's fresh pork tenderloin, or chops cut from the loin. The sweet, rosy flesh accepts a wide range of marinades, bastes and accompaniments, and the natural marbling keeps the meat moist even during direct-heat grilling, with or without the grill lid closed.Good grilling doesn't get much easier than this first recipe: An herbed mustard baste provides a tart counterpoint to the sweet succulence of loin pork chops. In the second recipe, the marinade doubles as a baste for the meat as it grills.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan and By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | April 14, 2002
Q. I have a hard time judging meat temperatures when I prepare lamb. I purchased a meat thermometer, but it didn't work out. The last time I cooked lamb, I waited until it reached 140 degrees. But when I cut into the meat, it was barely cooked inside. I would like to rely on a thermometer, because I always tend to overcook meat and chicken. What am I doing wrong? A. There's just one thing to remember when preparing lamb: Don't overcook it. It's not as hard as you think. As far as a meat thermometer goes, I highly recommend it for large pieces of meat or roasts.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | February 14, 1993
The other night I melted the meat thermometer. It began as many household disasters do, with the best of intentions. I wanted to make sure the hamburgers I was grilling had an internal temperature of at least 160 degrees Fahrenheit.That's the temperature health authorities have said kills bacterium E. coli 0157:H7 -- the culprit linked to death and illness of people who ate tainted Jack-in-the-Box burgers in Washington state.Washington state is on the other side of the country. And there have been no reports of tainted meat here.
FEATURES
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Sun Staff | November 18, 1998
Once again, it's time to do battle with the big bird.Unlike our grandmothers who plopped the poultry in a pan and shoved it in the oven to brown for hours, today's cooks face a barrage of equipment and cooking choices for the Thanksgiving turkey.Should they roast, grill, broil, deep-fry or micro-wave it? How about using a clay pot, a vertical roaster or just a regular rectangular pan?Often, tradition dictates the decision. But, more and more, holiday chefs are becoming adventuresome in preparing the day's main event.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan and By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | April 14, 2002
Q. I have a hard time judging meat temperatures when I prepare lamb. I purchased a meat thermometer, but it didn't work out. The last time I cooked lamb, I waited until it reached 140 degrees. But when I cut into the meat, it was barely cooked inside. I would like to rely on a thermometer, because I always tend to overcook meat and chicken. What am I doing wrong? A. There's just one thing to remember when preparing lamb: Don't overcook it. It's not as hard as you think. As far as a meat thermometer goes, I highly recommend it for large pieces of meat or roasts.
NEWS
October 8, 2000
To reduce the risk of food-borne illness from grilled beef, use a meat thermometer to ensure that the internal temperature of the thickest part of the meat reaches 145 degrees for medium rare or 160 degrees for medium. -- Cole's Cooking A to Z
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | September 5, 1999
If ever meat was made for grilling, it's fresh pork tenderloin, or chops cut from the loin. The sweet, rosy flesh accepts a wide range of marinades, bastes and accompaniments, and the natural marbling keeps the meat moist even during direct-heat grilling, with or without the grill lid closed.Good grilling doesn't get much easier than this first recipe: An herbed mustard baste provides a tart counterpoint to the sweet succulence of loin pork chops. In the second recipe, the marinade doubles as a baste for the meat as it grills.
FEATURES
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Sun Staff | November 18, 1998
Once again, it's time to do battle with the big bird.Unlike our grandmothers who plopped the poultry in a pan and shoved it in the oven to brown for hours, today's cooks face a barrage of equipment and cooking choices for the Thanksgiving turkey.Should they roast, grill, broil, deep-fry or micro-wave it? How about using a clay pot, a vertical roaster or just a regular rectangular pan?Often, tradition dictates the decision. But, more and more, holiday chefs are becoming adventuresome in preparing the day's main event.
FEATURES
By Tina Danze and Tina Danze,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | November 15, 1995
Thanksgiving dinner gives even seasoned cooks the jitters. And it's no wonder. The traditional feast is the most trumped-up meal of the year, yet it's one we never practice. How often do you make turkey, gravy and trimmings for 12?Not to despair.When the burden of Thanksgiving dinner rests solely with you, it's still possible to create a fine traditional meal without burning out before the guests arrive.With careful menu selection, planning and a few turkey pointers, you can roll out a feast that would make Grandma proud.
FEATURES
By Russ Parsons and Russ Parsons,Los Angeles Times | March 8, 1995
Browned and meaty, yet pink and tangy. Crusty outside, yet buttery inside. Firm, yet tender. Juicy, but not stringy. The art of roasting is the art of compromise.It is one of the oldest forms of cookery, and it is one of the grandest. For most cooks, it is also one fraught with concern."We can learn to be cooks, but we must be born knowing how to roast," wrote the French culinary philosopher Brillat-Savarin in "The Physiology of Taste" in 1825. But that was before the invention of the instant-read thermometer.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | November 23, 1994
Tell me about it. Your mouth is dry, your heart is thumping and your hands are trembling like the last few leaves on a maple tree in November. It's that time again. T time. The big T word. Yes. It's time to roast the annual Thanksgiving turkey.Chill. It's a simple process, really. And there are experts standing by at hot-line services run by turkey producers and the U.S. Department of Agriculture.There are really only three stages in the roasting of a turkey: Preparing the bird, cooking/timing the roasting period, and storing the leftovers.
FEATURES
By Gerald Etter and Gerald Etter,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 4, 1992
"Great Food Without Fuss" (Holt, $25) is a compilation of favorite recipes culled from the kitchens of 70 great cooks, such as Diana Kennedy and Julia Child.The book focuses on dishes that can be made quickly with minimum effort. Authors Frances McCullough, a cookbook editor, and Barbara Witt, a food consultant and former restaurateur, include their own recipes, plus general cooking tips.The structure of the book allows the reader to use it strictly as a recipe collection, or to take suggestions to improvise.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | November 23, 1994
Tell me about it. Your mouth is dry, your heart is thumping and your hands are trembling like the last few leaves on a maple tree in November. It's that time again. T time. The big T word. Yes. It's time to roast the annual Thanksgiving turkey.Chill. It's a simple process, really. And there are experts standing by at hot-line services run by turkey producers and the U.S. Department of Agriculture.There are really only three stages in the roasting of a turkey: Preparing the bird, cooking/timing the roasting period, and storing the leftovers.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | March 2, 1994
Q: Even though I add an entire bulb (about 12 cloves) of garlic to my pasta sauce and then simmer it, the finished sauce does not taste as spicy as I would like. Should I add more garlic?A: For a very robust red sauce for pasta, the amount of garlic you are using sounds sufficient, but you might change the technique a bit for optimum flavor. Try adding the garlic about 10 minutes before the sauce has finished cooking. The garlic will be more potent since it hasn't simmered for such a long time.
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