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By Julie Rothman,
For The Baltimore Sun
| April 16, 2013
Holly Renew from Baltimore was looking for a recipe for a mushroom loaf that was served at the now-closed restaurant in Canton called the Wild Mushroom. She said it was a featured item on the menu and similar to a meatloaf in consistency but contained no meat. I was not able to track down the exact recipe she sought, but I did some research and found a recipe for a very tasty vegetable "meatloaf" that was published in the March 2012 issue of Cooking Light magazine. This loaf is full of mushrooms and other vegetables.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman,
For The Baltimore Sun
| April 16, 2013
Holly Renew from Baltimore was looking for a recipe for a mushroom loaf that was served at the now-closed restaurant in Canton called the Wild Mushroom. She said it was a featured item on the menu and similar to a meatloaf in consistency but contained no meat. I was not able to track down the exact recipe she sought, but I did some research and found a recipe for a very tasty vegetable "meatloaf" that was published in the March 2012 issue of Cooking Light magazine. This loaf is full of mushrooms and other vegetables.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | February 18, 1994
Jim Steinman seems perfectly cast as a rock 'n' roll eminence grise. He's definitely a man with a vision -- a complete package of sound, image and mystique -- but it's one fashioned for and performed by others. Consequently, Steinman's biggest successes as a songwriter and producer invariably have someone else's name up in lights, while his moniker is relegated to the fine print and album credits.Others might find that situation horribly frustrating, but Steinman, in classic man-behind-the-scenes fashion, merely chuckles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2012
Foreman Wolf wants Johnny's to be an everyday destination for the folks of Roland Park, a place they can show up at, on a whim, for breakfast, lunch or dinner. And they have been. Johnny's is the fifth restaurant from Baltimore restaurateurs Tony Foreman and Cindy Wolf. The hits from Foreman Wolf, as their company is known, just keep on coming - Charleston, Pazo, Cinghiale and Petit Louis, which is Johnny's neighbor in the Roland Park Shopping Center. And Johnny's sure is good looking.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | September 24, 1993
BAT OUT OF HELL II: BACK INTO HELLMeat Loaf (MCA 10699) It's not unusual to find an artist who has had only one big hit spend the rest of his or her career repeating it, but few have ever taken that approach to the extreme that Meat Loaf does in "Bat Out of Hell II: Back Into Hell." Envisioned as a sequel to Loaf's 1978 smash, "Bat Out of Hell," it not only reunites the oversized singer with overblown producer Jim Steinman, but re- creates the overwrought sound of the original. Trouble is, Steinman's rock-symphonic approach -- which, even at its best, sounds like Andrew Lloyd Webber doing a bad imitation of Bruce Springsteen -- sounds even more ludicrous today than it did 15 years ago. And, after listening to Loaf flog the lyric "I'll do anything for love/But I won't do that" for a dozen minutes on end, it's all too easy to understand why this album was subtitled "Back Into Hell."
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Pop Music Critic | October 31, 2006
Years ago, both acts brought a campy theatricality to rock. In 1969, the Who stretched the genre's possibilities with Tommy, the celebrated but flawed "rock opera." Eight years later, Meat Loaf used a similar template for Bat Out of Hell, suffusing his bombastic mini-epics with kitsch and a winking sense of humor. Now, well into the iPod age when rock generally is more streamlined and hype supplants craft, the Who and Meat Loaf want to be grand again on their respective new releases: Endless Wire and Bat Out of Hell III: The Monster Is Loose.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | May 9, 2011
Potential GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump has been in the news lately for comments he made opposing same-sex marriage to the New York Times .  "It's like in golf," Trump told the paper. "... a lot of people are switching to these really long putters. Very unattractive. It's weird ... I hate it. I am a traditionalist. I have so many fabulous friends who happen to be gay, but I am a traditionalist. "  Last night on his NBC show, "The Celebrity Apprentice," Trump made more comments about homosexuality, which he refers to as "gayness.
SPORTS
By Bill Ordine | August 19, 2007
After Phil Rizzuto died Monday night, we included in our modest tribute a couple of recordings of Rizzuto's. One was his call on Roger Maris' 61st home run. The other was his part in the rock classic Paradise by the Dashboard Light by Meat Loaf. There's a nifty story by Jeff Pearlman on ESPN.com about how the Rizzuto thing came together. A gem anecdote that has Phil written all over it was about how Rizzuto's agent, former Met Art Shamsky, wanted to clear up one matter before the Scooter agreed to do the studio work.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 18, 2002
SUN SCORE *1/2 Formula 51 has the feel of an action-movie relic from the time when "attitude" was such a fresh concept that it could disguise the imaginative bankruptcy of sequences like a wrong-way-on-the-roadway car chase. Samuel L. Jackson stars as a master chemist in a kilt. The drug-boss villain is Meat Loaf in a caftan. The chemist's reluctant sidekick is Robert Carlyle in a red Liverpool Football Club jersey. The sidekick's hit-woman ex-girlfriend is Emily Mortimer in a little black dress or black leather coat.
SPORTS
By Tom Keegan and Tom Keegan,Sun Staff Writer | May 18, 1994
The only career shutout for Arthur Rhodes came July 29, 1992, at Yankee Stadium.Reminded that he shut out the Yankees, Rhodes said, "Yes I did. That was one of my better games and I hope to do even better this time."Rhodes didn't say exactly what would be better than a shutout, but he will get a chance to show it Saturday against the Yankees in his first start since May 1. Rhodes is on the 15-day disabled list with tendinitis in his right knee."I'll be starting Saturday in New York," Rhodes said, revealing classified information the club had been guarding with Pentagon-like secrecy.
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | April 25, 2012
Comfort food makes us all feel good, but it's usually not so good for our health. But there are ways to tinker with classic recipes to make them a little healthier. This week's recipe, from Bethenny Frankel of the Skinny Girl franchise , does just that. It's her more nutritious version of turkey meatloaf. She describes it as: The comfort of meatloaf without the calories. Hope you like it. If you have a healthy recipe you'd like to share send to andrea.walker@baltsun.com and I'll post it on this blog.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | May 9, 2011
Potential GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump has been in the news lately for comments he made opposing same-sex marriage to the New York Times .  "It's like in golf," Trump told the paper. "... a lot of people are switching to these really long putters. Very unattractive. It's weird ... I hate it. I am a traditionalist. I have so many fabulous friends who happen to be gay, but I am a traditionalist. "  Last night on his NBC show, "The Celebrity Apprentice," Trump made more comments about homosexuality, which he refers to as "gayness.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | July 15, 2009
Everyone wants to go reviewing with a restaurant critic, I'm not sure why. I guess it's partly to see how the process works and partly to get free food. And maybe partly to have a story to dine out on. The reality is, as you might expect, that the companion doesn't have quite so much fun as people think. Here are my Top 10 Things to Expect When Dining Out With a Restaurant Critic: 1 When you get to the restaurant, the critic will always get the seat that has the best view of the dining room.
SPORTS
December 30, 2008
1 Hit the road, Terp: As you watch Maryland in the Humanitarian Bowl (4:30 p.m., ESPN), note the sponsor, Roady's, is a chain of truck stops. As opposed to the movie Roadie, starring Meat Loaf (left). 2 Odds are: In the Holiday Bowl (8 p.m., ESPN), it's the Cowboys vs. the Ducks. And if you don't know which colleges those are, you shouldn't be betting the game. 3 Read all about it: In the Texas Bowl (NFL Network, 8 p.m.), maybe Western Michigan has a short player who will score five times against Rice.
SPORTS
By Bill Ordine | August 19, 2007
After Phil Rizzuto died Monday night, we included in our modest tribute a couple of recordings of Rizzuto's. One was his call on Roger Maris' 61st home run. The other was his part in the rock classic Paradise by the Dashboard Light by Meat Loaf. There's a nifty story by Jeff Pearlman on ESPN.com about how the Rizzuto thing came together. A gem anecdote that has Phil written all over it was about how Rizzuto's agent, former Met Art Shamsky, wanted to clear up one matter before the Scooter agreed to do the studio work.
ENTERTAINMENT
By NATHAN M. PITTS | January 4, 2007
Johnny Winter -- Rams Head Tavern / Blues guitarist Johnny Winter is at Rams Head Tavern, 33 West St. in Annapolis at 8:30 p.m. Wednesday and 10 p.m. Jan 13. Tickets are $49.50 and are available through ramsheadtavern.com. War -- The Birchmere / One of the earliest groups fusing rock, jazz, Latin and R&B, War has been around since 1969. The group, which according to its Web site performs about 150 shows a year, next stops by the Birchmere, 3701 Mount Vernon Ave., Alexandria, Va. The show is at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, and tickets are $35. Call 703-549-7500 or go to birchme re.com.
FEATURES
By Nathalie Dupree and Nathalie Dupree,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | March 12, 1995
I used to think the only kind of meat dishes possible for a busy day were quickly grilled chops or stir-fries. But elegant roasts such as a rib eye or tenderloin of beef, shoulder or leg of lamb, and pork loins and hams (both fresh and cured) are much easier to cook than a steak if you also need to prepare vegetables and get everything to come out at the same time. Ground meat can also take a long cooking, either in the Bolognese Meat Sauce (which cooks unattended all day) or a savory meat loaf, which is cooked, like a roast, according to weight.
SPORTS
December 30, 2008
1 Hit the road, Terp: As you watch Maryland in the Humanitarian Bowl (4:30 p.m., ESPN), note the sponsor, Roady's, is a chain of truck stops. As opposed to the movie Roadie, starring Meat Loaf (left). 2 Odds are: In the Holiday Bowl (8 p.m., ESPN), it's the Cowboys vs. the Ducks. And if you don't know which colleges those are, you shouldn't be betting the game. 3 Read all about it: In the Texas Bowl (NFL Network, 8 p.m.), maybe Western Michigan has a short player who will score five times against Rice.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Pop Music Critic | October 31, 2006
Years ago, both acts brought a campy theatricality to rock. In 1969, the Who stretched the genre's possibilities with Tommy, the celebrated but flawed "rock opera." Eight years later, Meat Loaf used a similar template for Bat Out of Hell, suffusing his bombastic mini-epics with kitsch and a winking sense of humor. Now, well into the iPod age when rock generally is more streamlined and hype supplants craft, the Who and Meat Loaf want to be grand again on their respective new releases: Endless Wire and Bat Out of Hell III: The Monster Is Loose.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Nathan M. Pitts and Nathan M. Pitts,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2003
An update on newly announced shows and ticket availability. For ticket information and purchase, call Ticketmaster at 410-481-SEAT or visit www.ticketmaster.com unless otherwise noted. Just announced Alabama performs at Nissan Pavilion in Manassas, Va., Aug. 24. Fleetwood Mac comes to the MCI Center in Washington Oct. 2. Tickets go on sale at noon Saturday. Gladys Knight plays the Rollins Center at Dover Downs Slots Aug. 21-22. Call 800-711-5882. Still available Earl Klugh at the Rams Head Tavern in Annapolis Aug. 16. Call 410-268-4545.
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