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By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2010
A ballot question to convene a convention to revise the state's constitution was supported by 55 percent of those who voted on the referendum, but the measure appears to have failed because too many voters abstained. For a convention to be called, the number of people voting "yes" would need to be more than 50 percent of the total number of Marylanders who voted overall. Although 55 percent, or about 845,021 voters, were in favor of calling a convention, outnumbering the 703,426 who opposed, 191,548 voters did not vote on the question, essentially voting down the measure, according to preliminary figures from the Maryland State Board of Elections on Thursday.
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NEWS
October 8, 2014
Complaints of excessive use of force and other misconduct by police are nearly as old as modern police departments themselves; the first known use of the term "police brutality" appeared in The New York Times in 1893, and it's been a problem for law-enforcement officials ever since. If police brutality isn't new, neither was much in the plan to combat it unveiled this week by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Police Commissioner Anthony Batts. Most of the steps it outlined, such as beefing up the department's internal affairs unit, giving the chief greater power to discipline officers and studying the idea of equipping police with body cameras that record their interactions with the public were little more than hasty rehashes of the strategic plan Mr. Batts commissioned in 2012 when he took over the department.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2011
Bonnie Celmer had been on the waiting list for Section 8 housing since July when she finally got a voucher three weeks ago. She's still living in a Baltimore County homeless shelter, unable to find an apartment. "I've been looking for a place, but I can't get anybody to accept the voucher," the 59-year-old said. Celmer spoke to a crowd of more than 100 gathered Wednesday evening at Towson United Methodist Church to support a proposal that would prohibit landlords from discriminating against potential tenants based on their sources of income.
NEWS
October 1, 2014
Michael Phelps was largely forgiven for driving drunk near Salisbury University in 2004 because he was 19 years old. The charge was reduced to driving impaired, his record ultimately wiped clean by the courts. Five years later when a photo of him inhaling from a water pipe commonly used to smoke marijuana hit the Internet, he apologized again, and that incident blew over quickly as well. But what happened early Tuesday morning outside the Fort McHenry Tunnel was different. The man who possesses the most Olympic medals of any athlete in history failed a Breathalyzer test.
NEWS
By Tim Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2014
The Maryland Senate unanimously approved Friday a major expansion of the state's network of legally protected wildlands. The O'Malley administration bill would create nine new wildlands and expand 14 existing sites already set aside because they harbor rare plants and animals or other natural features. Development, motor vehicles and even bicycles are barred in wildlands, but hiking, hunting, fishing and horseback riding are allowed. The measure now goes to the House. tim.wheeler@baltsun.com
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2012
Summer 2012 may have been the coolest in three years, but you nevertheless have likely paid slightly more to cool your house than you did a year earlier. The number of cooling degree days tallied so far this year is slightly ahead of where they were a year ago, at 1,505 versus 1,491 last year. Degree days are a measure of heating or cooling; in the summer months, they count up the amount by which average temperatures rise above 65 degrees. So, for example, it would take 75 days with an average temperature of 85 degrees to accumulate 1,500 degree days (20 degrees, for the difference between 65 and 85, times 75 days equals 1,500)
NEWS
December 19, 1990
MOUNT AIRY - A divided Planning Commission approved a proposed ordinance that would require builders to preserve at least 30 percent of existing trees undisturbed in new residential developments.The tree-preservation measure, which would apply to parcels of 500,000 square feet or larger, passed by a 3-2 vote.At an industrial or commercial development, 15 percent of the existing trees must be undisturbed, according to the measure.The proposed ordinance now goes on to the Town Council, which must conduct a public hearing and will make the final decision, possibly in January.
NEWS
November 14, 1990
SYKESVILLE - Town residents would able to erect satellite dishes in their yards if an amendment introduced by the Town Council on Monday becomes law.The measure would amend an ordinance that bars such devices on residences inside the town limits.The council scheduled a Dec. 10 hearing to take public comment on the proposed amendment.As written, the measure would restrict satellite dishes to side yards or back yards; require the devices be set back 10 feet from property lines; and require that they be visibly blocked from view from public rights of way.The council debated the third provision, indicating it may be too harsh and may be removed in the final version.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | February 12, 1992
It's a cleaner, gentler Annapolis, a brave new world where trash cans must be hidden and walking around with an open beer bottle is a strict no-no.To protect the peaceful ambience of Maryland's capital,the City Council adopted four nuisance ordinances Monday night, including regulations restricting parking recreational vehicles and carrying open alcoholic beverages on the street.A measure that provoked an outburst of discussion and laughter targets people who mistake flower boxes and alleys for toilets.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau | March 25, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The House has approved a measure that would allow for the expansion of the Assateague Island National Seashore in Worcester County.The legislation, approved by voice vote yesterday, would allow the National Park Service to purchase 96 acres of the Elizabeth Woodcock estate, south of Md. 611. The rest of the 320-acre farm is expected to be largely preserved through the purchase by an environmental trust.Maryland lawmakers said the legislation was necessary to prevent commercial development of the property, owned by the late Mrs. Woodcock and located near the Verrazano Bridge, which connects Worcester County to the barrier island.
SPORTS
By Dean Jones Jr. and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
The Orioles recently joined a growing number of teams to institute additional security procedures to prepare for Major League Baseball's requirements at the beginning of next season. While the added measures currently are in effect at some entrances to Camden Yards, MLB has mandated that all 30 ballparks develop a screening program before Opening Day in April. "The safety of our guests is of the utmost importance to the ballclub. As such, the Orioles are cooperating with Major League Baseball's efforts to implement enhanced security measures at all ballparks," Orioles vice president of communications Greg Bader said in a statement.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2014
Baltimore schools CEO Gregory Thornton said Wednesday that he is in the early stages of assessing where the central office can be more efficient and already cut back on two expenditures criticized during the previous administration. During a meeting with The Baltimore Sun's editorial board, Thornton said he will not employ a full-time driver, a job that has paid six-figure wages to a police sergeant for several years because of overtime. Thornton has also directed that limits be placed on how much is spent on food for professional development events and other meetings.
NEWS
July 30, 2014
The state set a goal to reduce hospital errors "by 30 percent in the next 5 years," but regulators acknowledge the number of errors reported is inaccurate ( "Maryland hospitals aren't reporting all errors and complications, experts say," July 27). How can you can reduce something by 30 percent when "something" (i.e., hospital errors) cannot be determined? The paramount rule in establishing strategic goals is that they must be measurable. This goal is not. Terry Callanan - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
The Maryland State Highway Administration plans to lower the speed limit and add median fencing and a new traffic light on U.S. 1 near the University of Maryland, College Park, after a startling number of pedestrian deaths on the road. Officials decided to expedite the safety measures - ideas that came from a months-long study of the area - to have them in place by the upcoming fall semester. Three pedestrians have been killed crossing U.S. 1 in the past six months. Beginning Aug. 1, U.S. 1's speed limit will be dropped to 25 mph from 30 mph between Guilford and Berwyn roads, the highway administration said.
NEWS
July 7, 2014
In Howard County, it's perfectly legal to consume the biggest, most gargantuan family-size bag of barbecue-flavored potato chips at one sitting and wash it down with a case of the most sugary soda ever made. Or, if that's not your taste, perhaps something more along the lines of the Homer Simpson diet with a thousand glazed doughnuts and a 64-ounce carton of chocolate syrup. County employees can partake of this artery-clogging, stomach-distending meal as often as they'd like. So can public school students.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
A policy that Gov. Martin O'Malley said would limit deportations from Baltimore to cases in which the immigrant poses a threat to public safety is facing criticism from advocates, who say it contains a loophole so large it will inevitably fall short of that goal. At issue is the way the state responds to requests by federal authorities to hold arrestees at Baltimore's Central Booking and Intake Center for possible deportation. O'Malley announced the new policy after The Baltimore Sun reported that 40 percent of immigrants deported from Maryland through a controversial federal program known as Secure Communities had no prior criminal record - despite the Obama administration's stated focus on prioritizing for removal those who committed crimes after crossing the border.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | May 4, 1993
Smokers in Anne Arundel County will have fewer places to light up after the County Council last night unanimously approved a measure that bans smoking in many public areas.The measure, which takes effect in 45 days, mandates no-smoking areas in restaurants seating more than 75 patrons and businesses with more than 50 employees. It also bans smoking in banks, classrooms, lecture halls, auditoriums, health care facilities, public meeting rooms, museums, galleries, libraries and restrooms, among other places.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Sun Staff Writer | July 27, 1994
In a major about-face, the Laurel City Council has tabled a sweeping resolution that would have condemned the Redskins' proposed football stadium just east of town.Four of five council members supported the measure at a July 7 work session, but the council voted 3 to 1 with one abstention to table the measure after a public hearing Monday. Another public hearing was held on the resolution July 18."That was a win on our part," said Walter Lynch, the Redskins' project manager for the stadium.
NEWS
By Catherine Rentz, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
— The Obama administration announced Tuesday an initiative to track every fish sold in the United States — a move designed to crack down on illegal fishing, mislabeling of seafood and related problems. Secretary of State John Kerry, who is leading the push for new ocean conservation measures, said the measures will "ensure all seafood sold in the U.S. is both sustainable and traceable, meaning all customers will know exactly who caught it, where and when. " The United States plays a big role in the world's seafood market; it's the largest importer after Japan.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
The Anne Arundel County Council banned new rubble landfills throughout the county at its meeting Monday night, dismissing warnings from the county attorney that the measure could be challenged in court. The bill, which started as a ban on rubble landfills in residential areas but was amended to include the entire county, passed by a 7-0 vote in Annapolis. The ban would go into effect Jan. 1. Council members voted for the ban over the objections of the county executive's office and the county attorney.
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